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Julian Bond

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NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist Julian Bond, who died Saturday, was born in Tennessee but moved to Pennsylvania as a boy. In 1945, his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University in Chester County, according to the university website. The elder Bond served Lincoln, his alma mater, until 1957. Julian Bond graduated in 1957 from George School, a private Quaker high school near Newtown, Bucks County. "We were shocked and saddened to hear of Julian's death," said George head of school Nancy Starmer.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
The desire by young Americans for personal power and material things could reverse civil rights gains made by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., according to civil rights leader Julian Bond. Young people today are complacent and laissez faire in their attitudes toward civil rights, Bond said in an address to about 70 people during an observance of Dr. King's birthday at Penn State's Ogontz Campus in Abington last Friday. Delivering his report card on the state of civil rights, Bond said that former hippies-turned-yuppies and those striving to graduate from college so that they could reap fat paychecks have failed society.
NEWS
September 3, 1986 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a campaign long on style and personality and short on issues, after a campaign that sorely tested their 25-year friendship, John Lewis inched out his old friend Julian Bond for the Democratic nomination for Georgia's Fifth Congressional seat yesterday. And the difference in styles between the two civil rights gladiators was never more apparent than on election night. Bond spent the night holed up in the Imperial Suite of the American Hotel downtown. Lewis spent the night at his campaign headquarters, right next door to the Gospel Light Rescue Mission.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | By John Timpane, Commentary Page editor
On Feb. 21, the NAACP elected Julian Bond, 58, as its new chairman. As one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Bond played an important role in the civil rights movement. A former Georgia state senator, he teaches history at American University in Washington and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Bond assumes this position at a time when the NAACP is in good organizational health. Outgoing chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams and current president Kweisi Mfume have turned a $4.8 million debt in 1994 to a current $2 million surplus.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | by Kay Raftery, From the New York Times
The slap sent me sprawling across the sidewalk, landing on my rear end. My hands were scraped, my cheek throbbed, blood came out of my nose. I looked up at a policeman standing over me. Other police ran over to calm him down and help me up. I stumbled away, around the corner to my hotel. The lobby was filled with tear gas, stinging my eyes. I groped, trying to find the elevators. I started to cry. "Come on," a voice said, "I know a back way. " A tall, young man was smiling at me. I looked at the outstretched black hand.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
Julian Bond, chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, has a long personal connection to the Barnes Foundation. His father, Horace Mann Bond, had a close friendship with Albert C. Barnes, who created the foundation and collected the paintings that now compose the Barnes collection in Lower Merion. The elder Bond was the first black president of Lincoln University, to which Barnes gave authority in his will to name four of the five members of the Barnes Foundation board.
LIVING
March 30, 1995 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You could say that Julian Bond did his first civil-rights work at age 8. He and his sister Jane were plaintiffs in a 1948 desegregation case that closed Lincoln Colored School - an all-black elementary school in the Chester County, Pa., town where their father happened to be a university president. Bond, gray-haired, elegant and self-possessed at 55, is a little hazy on the details. "For a historian, I am real weak on dates," he says in the course of a day of reminiscences.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By Fred Grimm, Knight-Ridder News Service
He was only an ex-state senator and a one-time congressional candidate who never made it past the primary election, but Julian Bond's name at the center of a local cocaine scandal brought television networks and major newspapers trooping to Atlanta. It was not who he was that drew so much attention, but what he might have become. "He was a man of such tremendous potential," said political historian Merle Black. "He had a national constituency and national visibility like no other state legislator.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer (Knight-Ridder correspondent Fred Grimm contributed to this report.)
Former state Sen. Julian Bond yesterday denied his wife's allegations that he was a cocaine abuser and criticized the news media for reporting what he described as a domestic dispute. "I've never used cocaine. Never at all, never at all," he said during an interview on a local radio station. When asked later in the program if he would submit to a drug test, Bond replied: "No. I'd never take a drug test. As long as I live, I'll never take a drug test. " Earlier, during a terse news conference at Morehouse College where he refused to answer reporters' questions, Bond read a statement in which he said he had "not committed or been charged with any crime" and criticized what he called "those professional scavengers and gossip mongers who have made life hell for innocent people.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist and former Georgia state Sen. Julian Bond yesterday called the Fair Housing Act of 1968 a "great failed effort" and he charged that the law has no teeth and has had little effect on discrimination in housing. "For many black potential homeowners, their biggest handicap isn't lack of income, but simple lack of opportunity caused by the failure of the fair housing" act, Bond said during a speech yesterday before the National Neighbors Conference. Bond, who rose to prominence during the civil rights movement of the 1960s, was the opening speaker at the fair-housing advocacy group's 19th annual conference, which is continuing through Sunday at Drexel University.
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NEWS
August 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Julian Bond wasn't born in Pennsylvania, but many considered the civil rights leader, who died Saturday, a native son. In 1945, at the age of 5, he came to the state from Nashville when his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University. At 17, he left when his father became a dean at Atlanta University. Later, at Morehouse College, Bond became a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. His long career in the movement reached its pinnacle in 1998, when he became chairman of the NAACP, a post he held for 11 years.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist Julian Bond, who died Saturday, was born in Tennessee but moved to Pennsylvania as a boy. In 1945, his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University in Chester County, according to the university website. The elder Bond served Lincoln, his alma mater, until 1957. Julian Bond graduated in 1957 from George School, a private Quaker high school near Newtown, Bucks County. "We were shocked and saddened to hear of Julian's death," said George head of school Nancy Starmer.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA & WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writers medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
IT WAS 2006 - well past the time when Julian Bond could have easily coasted on his laurels as a founding father of the U.S. civil-rights movement who'd fought all the way to the Supreme Court to become one of Georgia's first black lawmakers. But when Bond learned that Pennsylvania was considering a bill to allow interest rates as high as 400 percent on so-called "payday loans," the then-NAACP chairman had to speak up. That's what he always did when he saw a perceived injustice. "Payday lenders prey on poor and working class families, a disproportionate number of whom are African-American, literally stealing money from their victims," Bond wrote to then-Gov.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Jonathan Capehart
When leaders lead, especially on difficult social issues that demand the end of an injustice or the expansion of liberty, people will follow. The NAACP's resolution supporting marriage equality is the most important sign yet that President Obama's public support of it had the power to change hearts and minds. While individual NAACP leaders have spoken out in favor of allowing gays to wed, most notably chairman emeritus Julian Bond, the organization hadn't spoken with one voice — until now. And as remarkable as the resolution is, what's equally noteworthy is the vote.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new study by a prominent antidiscrimination group gives 35 states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey, failing grades when it comes to teaching students about the civil rights movement. Officials of the Southern Poverty Law Center, which released the study, also found that Pennsylvania was among 16 states that did not require that the history of the movement be taught in public school. "An educated populace must be taught basics about American history," civil rights activist and former center president Julian Bond wrote in the report's foreword.
SPORTS
March 25, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plymouth Whitemarsh's Jaylen Bond may have picked the perfect time to get rid of the blues, caused by foul-shooting woes, that have plagued him recently. Last night, in a PIAA Class AAAA state semifinal against North Allegheny, with University of Pittsburgh coach Jamie Dixon watching him for the first time, Bond delivered a monster performance to place PW within a win of its first state championship since 1997. Fueling a 16-2 scoring surge, Bond erupted for 12 of his game-high 26 points in the third quarter as the Colonials broke open a two-point game and blasted the Tigers, 71-47, at Chambersburg Area High.
SPORTS
March 18, 2010 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plymouth Whitemarsh went into last night's PIAA Class AAAA boys' basketball second-round game against Frankford having scored 70 points or more in 16 of its 28 games. But for much of the first half, there might have been some doubt whether the two teams would combine for 70 points. Ultimately, the District 1 runner-up Colonials prevailed, 66-43, after a third-quarter surge that gave them an 11-point lead. Once the Colonials put some daylight between themselves and Frankford, they were never really threatened.
SPORTS
March 3, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From seeing him on film, West Chester Rustin had an idea of what to expect out of Plymouth Whitemarsh's C.J. Aiken in last night's PIAA Class AAAA District 1 Class AAAA semifinal playoff matchup. However, the fifth-seeded Golden Knights never anticipated the 6-foot-10 senior standout to dominate the paint the way he did. Aiken racked up nine blocks in the opening 16 minutes, finished with 11 rejections, and added 12 points and 12 rebounds as the top-seeded Colonials waltzed to a 79-47 victory at Villanova.
SPORTS
December 10, 2009 | By Pat Leonard FOR THE INQUIRER
Plymouth Whitemarsh came close to winning it all last season, but if this year's Colonials play up to preseason expectations, they might go beyond merely getting close. Twelfth-year coach Jim Donofrio returns 11 players and four starters from a group that shared last season's Suburban One American title with Norristown and fell just short in the PIAA Class AAAA state semifinals to finish 24-5. "I haven't had a team this advanced this early in the season," said Donofrio, whose 2005-06 team opened 27-0.
NEWS
May 23, 2008
Incoming NAACP president Benjamin Todd Jealous is getting lots of good wishes. But he knows that he has a mighty tall order to fill. Only three years ago, similar tidings were sent to Bruce Gordon, the Camden native whose business acumen was supposed to resurrect the NAACP's stature as the nation's premier civil rights organization. Instead, after 19 months at the helm, Gordon and the NAACP declared irreconcilable differences and divorced. Gordon and NAACP board chairman Julian Bond, who also has roots in the Philadelphia area, never agreed on what should be the organization's focus going forward.
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