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Julian Schnabel

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
How odd it seems that Julian Schnabel's first New York museum exhibition should have been organized in London. On the other hand, Schnabel is such a well-known quantity here that a museum show of his work, such as the one that opened at the Whitney Museum of American Art on Tuesday, is almost redundant. The Tuesday opening was itself an oddity, a rescheduled event that took place because transportation problems had prevented the paintings' arrival from London in time to be fully installed for the planned opening on Nov. 6. The inaugural bash took place as scheduled on Nov. 5, though, with some hastily borrowed paintings.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
We don't learn much about mercurial painter Jean Michel Basquiat in the biopic "Basquiat," but we do come away with a very favorable impression of painter Julian Schnabel, who also rose to art-world stardom in 1980s Manhattan. We should not be totally surprised, then, to learn that "Basquiat" is written and directed by . . . Julian Schnabel! The director has been touting "Basquiat" by saying its the first movie about a painter made by a painter. I guess this is good news, although I'm not sure I'd want "Tin Cup" to be made by a golf pro, or "Independence Day" to be made by a Martian.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"The Diving Bell and the Butterly" started picking up awards at Cannes earlier this year - best director for Julian Schnabel - and the momentum hasn't stopped. The true-life saga of a dashing Frenchman (Mathieu Amalric) learning to communicate after a paralyzing stroke was just named the National Board of Review best foreign-language film, and the film is up for three Golden Globes. It echoes Schnabel's success with "Before Night Falls," his profile of exiled, homosexual Cuban poet Reinaldo Arenas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The flameout life of Jean-Michel Basquiat goes like this: lived fast, died young, left a beautiful corpse and a couple of hundred canvases worth millions on the international art market. Basquiat is an '80s story - filtered through the sensibilities (and monster ego) of pal, painter and now filmmaker Julian Schnabel - set in East Village tenements and swank SoHo lofts. It's the portrait of an artist's meteoric rise to stardom, a chronicle of his maundering path through downtown greasy spoons, punk clubs and cavernous gallery spaces, the dope he scored, and the bridges - and friends - he burned along the way. Moving to a cool soundtrack (John Cale, the Pogues, Tom Waits, and P.J. Harvey singing "Is That All There Is?"
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
In the movie "Quills," an imprisoned writer declares that the more you censor art, the more it flourishes. It's a very stirring and romantic thing to say (you find it repeated often in movies), but fortunately not actually true. If it were, Jesse Helms and Newt Gingrich would be the best friends art ever had. And we'd all be agreed that the way to ensure copious amounts of great art would be to throw all artists in jail. Tempting. . .but not likely to achieve the desired result.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Jimi Hendrix of the East Village, Jean-Michel Basquiat was a rock star among 1980s painters and member of the exclusive "27 Club. " Namely, that group of artists, like Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison, who sought self-knowledge in their self-destruction and flamed out at 27. Now considered one of the preeminent figures of 20th-century art, Basquiat is a movie star as well. He was the central figure of the punkumentary Downtown 81, sentimentalized as a Chaplinesque homeless man-child of Lower Manhattan at home everywhere because he really lived in his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The art business may be dead in the water right now, but just a few years ago, during the economic boom of the 1980s, artists and dealers were gorging themselves on a decade-long bull market. Art fever not only made many artists rich but made them as famous and as put-upon as movie stars. The artist-as-celebrity phenomenon raised disturbing questions about the integrity of contemporary art. It was obvious that some status-conscious collectors were paying too much for work that was still wet behind the ears.
NEWS
February 18, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Was Jean-Michel Basquiat a homeless drug addict who covered New York City with graffiti, or was he a highly educated artist from a middle-class African American family driven to succeed in the art world, no matter the cost? That's the question posed by the Free Library's second annual visual literacy program, One Film, to be devoted this year to artist and filmmaker Julian Schnabel's 1996 film debut, Basquiat. The lyrical biopic stars Jeffrey Wright as the artist; David Bowie as his friend and mentor, Andy Warhol; and Gary Oldman as Schnabel's fictionalized alter ego, Albert Milo.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It could be a Zen koan, what just came out of Julian Schnabel's mouth: "Nobody knows better than you what you need to do, even if you don't know what you're doing. " Well, Zen with the hubris filter turned off. Thumping around the country, presenting his brilliant, beautiful The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to film societies and fans - and doing rounds of Q&As and press interviews - Schnabel pulled into Philadelphia last week. After the end credits rolled at the Ritz at the Bourse the other night, the moderator for the event introduced the world-famous artist-turned-director as "Julian Snabbel," sans the shhh.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It could be a Zen koan, what just came out of Julian Schnabel's mouth: "Nobody knows better than you what you need to do, even if you don't know what you're doing. " Well, Zen with the hubris filter turned off. Thumping around the country, presenting his brilliant, beautiful The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to film societies and fans - and doing rounds of Q&As and press interviews - Schnabel pulled into Philadelphia last week. After the end credits rolled at the Ritz at the Bourse the other night, the moderator for the event introduced the world-famous artist-turned-director as "Julian Snabbel," sans the shhh . A tad irritably, Schnabel corrected him. A while later he threatened to quit the room if a couple gabbing up front didn't shut up. Uh-oh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Jimi Hendrix of the East Village, Jean-Michel Basquiat was a rock star among 1980s painters and member of the exclusive "27 Club. " Namely, that group of artists, like Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison, who sought self-knowledge in their self-destruction and flamed out at 27. Now considered one of the preeminent figures of 20th-century art, Basquiat is a movie star as well. He was the central figure of the punkumentary Downtown 81, sentimentalized as a Chaplinesque homeless man-child of Lower Manhattan at home everywhere because he really lived in his head.
NEWS
February 18, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Was Jean-Michel Basquiat a homeless drug addict who covered New York City with graffiti, or was he a highly educated artist from a middle-class African American family driven to succeed in the art world, no matter the cost? That's the question posed by the Free Library's second annual visual literacy program, One Film, to be devoted this year to artist and filmmaker Julian Schnabel's 1996 film debut, Basquiat. The lyrical biopic stars Jeffrey Wright as the artist; David Bowie as his friend and mentor, Andy Warhol; and Gary Oldman as Schnabel's fictionalized alter ego, Albert Milo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"The Diving Bell and the Butterly" started picking up awards at Cannes earlier this year - best director for Julian Schnabel - and the momentum hasn't stopped. The true-life saga of a dashing Frenchman (Mathieu Amalric) learning to communicate after a paralyzing stroke was just named the National Board of Review best foreign-language film, and the film is up for three Golden Globes. It echoes Schnabel's success with "Before Night Falls," his profile of exiled, homosexual Cuban poet Reinaldo Arenas.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It could be a Zen koan, what just came out of Julian Schnabel's mouth: "Nobody knows better than you what you need to do, even if you don't know what you're doing. " Well, Zen with the hubris filter turned off. Thumping around the country, presenting his brilliant, beautiful The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to film societies and fans - and doing rounds of Q&As and press interviews - Schnabel pulled into Philadelphia last week. After the end credits rolled at the Ritz at the Bourse the other night, the moderator for the event introduced the world-famous artist-turned-director as "Julian Snabbel," sans the shhh.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It could be a Zen koan, what just came out of Julian Schnabel's mouth: "Nobody knows better than you what you need to do, even if you don't know what you're doing. " Well, Zen with the hubris filter turned off. Thumping around the country, presenting his brilliant, beautiful The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to film societies and fans - and doing rounds of Q&As and press interviews - Schnabel pulled into Philadelphia last week. After the end credits rolled at the Ritz at the Bourse the other night, the moderator for the event introduced the world-famous artist-turned-director as "Julian Snabbel," sans the shhh . A tad irritably, Schnabel corrected him. A while later he threatened to quit the room if a couple gabbing up front didn't shut up. Uh-oh.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
In the movie "Quills," an imprisoned writer declares that the more you censor art, the more it flourishes. It's a very stirring and romantic thing to say (you find it repeated often in movies), but fortunately not actually true. If it were, Jesse Helms and Newt Gingrich would be the best friends art ever had. And we'd all be agreed that the way to ensure copious amounts of great art would be to throw all artists in jail. Tempting. . .but not likely to achieve the desired result.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
We don't learn much about mercurial painter Jean Michel Basquiat in the biopic "Basquiat," but we do come away with a very favorable impression of painter Julian Schnabel, who also rose to art-world stardom in 1980s Manhattan. We should not be totally surprised, then, to learn that "Basquiat" is written and directed by . . . Julian Schnabel! The director has been touting "Basquiat" by saying its the first movie about a painter made by a painter. I guess this is good news, although I'm not sure I'd want "Tin Cup" to be made by a golf pro, or "Independence Day" to be made by a Martian.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The flameout life of Jean-Michel Basquiat goes like this: lived fast, died young, left a beautiful corpse and a couple of hundred canvases worth millions on the international art market. Basquiat is an '80s story - filtered through the sensibilities (and monster ego) of pal, painter and now filmmaker Julian Schnabel - set in East Village tenements and swank SoHo lofts. It's the portrait of an artist's meteoric rise to stardom, a chronicle of his maundering path through downtown greasy spoons, punk clubs and cavernous gallery spaces, the dope he scored, and the bridges - and friends - he burned along the way. Moving to a cool soundtrack (John Cale, the Pogues, Tom Waits, and P.J. Harvey singing "Is That All There Is?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The art business may be dead in the water right now, but just a few years ago, during the economic boom of the 1980s, artists and dealers were gorging themselves on a decade-long bull market. Art fever not only made many artists rich but made them as famous and as put-upon as movie stars. The artist-as-celebrity phenomenon raised disturbing questions about the integrity of contemporary art. It was obvious that some status-conscious collectors were paying too much for work that was still wet behind the ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
How odd it seems that Julian Schnabel's first New York museum exhibition should have been organized in London. On the other hand, Schnabel is such a well-known quantity here that a museum show of his work, such as the one that opened at the Whitney Museum of American Art on Tuesday, is almost redundant. The Tuesday opening was itself an oddity, a rescheduled event that took place because transportation problems had prevented the paintings' arrival from London in time to be fully installed for the planned opening on Nov. 6. The inaugural bash took place as scheduled on Nov. 5, though, with some hastily borrowed paintings.
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