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Julie Andrews

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LIVING
November 20, 1998 | By W. Speers This report contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News, Los Angeles Times, and Washington Post
Julie Andrews' voice is shot. "I don't think she'll ever sing again," says her husband, director Blake Edwards, in the issue of Parade mag out Sunday. "It's an absolute tragedy. " Andrews, 63, developed voice problems during the Broadway run of Victor/Victoria, and in June 1997 had surgery to remove noncancerous throat nodules. "She was told she'd be OK in six weeks, the voice would actually be better," Edwards says. "It's over a year and if you heard it, you'd weep. There isn't a day when her voice doesn't get weak.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Beginning a four-night engagement at the Valley Forge Music Fair last night, Julie Andrews unveiled a classy musical act that was elaborate in its autobiographical concept but rather reserved in its execution. Comedian Brian Allen of television's Real People warmed up the crowd with a series of innocuous routines, including the perilous details of living alone. "In my refrigerator," he said, "I have roquefort cheese . . . used to be cheddar. " Then, after the orchestra had played an overture of her best-known tunes, Andrews began her first concert in eight years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Inside every klutzy 10th-grade girl is a self-possessed sylph struggling to get out. This is the reassuring message of The Princess Diaries, an inoffensive self-esteem comedy disguised as a makeover movie. Alas, as is so often the case with such pictures, "before" is infinitely more attractive than "after. " She may be frizzy-haired and beetle-browed, but Mia Thermopolis (Anne Hathaway) is a rough diamond who requires almost no polish to sparkle - on the outside. Inside is another matter, which is why Julie Andrews is on hand.
LIVING
July 19, 1987 | Inquirer staff and wire service reviews, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A soapy drama starring Julie Andrews and an unconventional comedy from director Jonathan Demme were the high points of last week's list of video arrivals. DUET FOR ONE (1986) (MGM/UA) $79.95. 107 minutes. Pure honky-tonk. The play was a life-affirming story of a violin virtuoso afflicted with crippling multiple sclerosis who finally realizes that there are things more important than music. The movie is an occasion to witness the previously hidden histrionics of Julie Andrews.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Think of Julie Andrews, and visions of Mary Poppins and her magic umbrella pop into mind. It's an image that Andrews never will be totally free of - not even after playing a woman playing a man playing a woman in Victor/Victoria and baring her breasts in S.O.B. After all, everybody knows that in S.O.B. Andrews was just having fun, spoofing that Poppins image created so long ago by Walt Disney. On the other hand, what hardly anyone thinks of these days is Julie Andrews on stage, performing in front of a live audience, despite the fact that this is where her roots are, going back to Andrews' English music-hall days and triumphs on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Mary Poppins, Liza Doolittle and thoroughly modern Millie are coming to Valley Forge Music Fair next month with a 40-piece orchestra. It's Julie Andrews, of course, in what the VFMF honchos are billing as her first Philadelphia-area concert appearance. The star of "The Boy Friend," "My Fair Lady," "Camelot," et al, will break in her new act at the Devon dome Thursday through Sunday, Oct. 29-Nov. 1. "A Captivating Evening with Julie Andrews," as it is titled, is built on songs from her many films and Broadway shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
What inspires a Broadway and Hollywood great to return to concert performing after an eight-year absence? "It was now or never," said Julie Andrews of the concert tour bringing her to Valley Forge Music Fair tonight through Sunday. "I reckoned that in another five or 10 years, I might regret not having done it. If I could say, 'I had the chance and I didn't take it,' I'd feel a bit of a fool. " Andrews is one of the most versatile and charming women ever to grace the stage, screen and telly.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, the song goes. But that lovin' spoonful can make some gag. Consider Julie Andrews, who as Mary Poppins sang her syrupy lyrics with such brio in 1964 that critic Pauline Kael branded the English actress "Mary Marzipan. " Kael's subsequent derision of Maria, Andrews' singing nun in The Sound of Music ("the sound of money," she drubbed it), dug a deep trench in the shifting sands of the 1960s. On one side were the Eisenhower holdovers who revered Andrews.
NEWS
August 7, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Even in person, Julie Andrews looks airbrushed. Though her laugh lines coexist with smartly applied makeup, she's still the face that launched some of the world's greatest musicals as long as a half-century ago. But the most dramatic evidence of her victory against the passage of time is the fact that, at age 72 and against rather unusual odds, Andrews will sing tonight at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. The program, titled The Gift of Music, is built around a musical-theater adaptation of her children's book Simeon's Gift.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
On the night Sandy Wilson's The Boy Friend opened on Broadway more than 50 years ago, Julie Andrews wasn't in her dressing room. Theatergoers who chanced to look up from 45th Street would have seen the very jittery leading lady sitting on a fire escape in the alley next to the Royale. Beside Andrews sat the show's understandably worried director, Cy Feuer, who tried to calm her with advice and encouragement. The Boy Friend marked the Broadway debut of Andrews, who was all of 19. As she candidly remembers, things were not going well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
  J ULIE ANDREWS , who was America's Sweetheart starring in Broadway's "My Fair Lady" and movie versions of "The Sound of Music" and "Mary Poppins," before baring her breasts 16 years later in "S.O.B.," directed by her husband Blake  Edwards , will bare all in her second memoir. Hachette Books announced yesterday that the Oscar-winning actress is working on a follow-up to the 2008 release Home , which covers her childhood and early years in show business. The next book, currently untitled, begins in the 1960s and takes readers through her next three decades, including her many hit films.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was for Julie Christopher Plummer missed last weekend's Academy Awards, which paid tribute to his 1965 classic The Sound of Music , to allow costar Julie Andrews to bask in the glow. "It was really a tribute to Julie. It's her movie," Plummer, 85, tells People. "Had I appeared there, I would have looked like a spare [obscenity] at a wedding. That's the most perfect description of how I would have looked. " Plummer heaped praise on Lady Gaga 's version of the title song, proving that her Ladyship transcends age. "She knows how to do two styles.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
THE Daily News Pet of the Week is Julie Andrews, a 1-to-2-year-old pit-bull mix at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Julie Andrews is friendly and willing to please. She would be fine with other dogs and with children. To adopt Julie Andrews, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901, before visiting the shelter. When inquiring, provide her tag identifier - A18835767. A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines and microchipping.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Lauri Neff, Associated Press
NEW YORK - It may take a big spoonful of sugar to make this go down: Julie Andrews says that her four-octave voice is not coming back. The Oscar- and Tony Award-winning actress said in a recent interview that a botched operation to remove noncancerous throat nodules in 1997 hasn't gotten better. It has permanently limited her range and her ability to hold notes. "The operation that I had left me without a voice and without a certain piece of my vocal cords," said Andrews, who starred in such quintessential stage and film musicals as The Sound of Music , My Fair Lady and Mary Poppins . The actress, who narrates the "Christmas Pageant of Lights" at Macy's Center City in Philadelphia, says she can still speak "pretty well" and can still hit a few bass notes, "So if you wanted a rendition of 'Ol' Man River' you might get it, but I'm not singing as much these days.
NEWS
August 7, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Even in person, Julie Andrews looks airbrushed. Though her laugh lines coexist with smartly applied makeup, she's still the face that launched some of the world's greatest musicals as long as a half-century ago. But the most dramatic evidence of her victory against the passage of time is the fact that, at age 72 and against rather unusual odds, Andrews will sing tonight at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. The program, titled The Gift of Music, is built around a musical-theater adaptation of her children's book Simeon's Gift.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
On the night Sandy Wilson's The Boy Friend opened on Broadway more than 50 years ago, Julie Andrews wasn't in her dressing room. Theatergoers who chanced to look up from 45th Street would have seen the very jittery leading lady sitting on a fire escape in the alley next to the Royale. Beside Andrews sat the show's understandably worried director, Cy Feuer, who tried to calm her with advice and encouragement. The Boy Friend marked the Broadway debut of Andrews, who was all of 19. As she candidly remembers, things were not going well.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When the cast of The Boy Friend called their neophyte director, Julie Andrews, to the stage to wish her a happy birthday following the curtain calls at Saturday's opening performance at the DuPont Theatre, the audience stood and applauded as it joined in to sing "Happy Birthday to You. " But even if Andrews hadn't been celebrating her 70th that day, the audience would have had cause to give her a standing ovation. The about-perfect production they had just witnessed was a triumph.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, the song goes. But that lovin' spoonful can make some gag. Consider Julie Andrews, who as Mary Poppins sang her syrupy lyrics with such brio in 1964 that critic Pauline Kael branded the English actress "Mary Marzipan. " Kael's subsequent derision of Maria, Andrews' singing nun in The Sound of Music ("the sound of money," she drubbed it), dug a deep trench in the shifting sands of the 1960s. On one side were the Eisenhower holdovers who revered Andrews.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services and the Hollywood Reporter contributed to this report
JULIE ANDREWS, star of "Mary Poppins," "The Sound of Music" and Broadway, is supporting a pioneering research program on vocal restoration that could help her sing again. In 1997, Andrews underwent surgery to remove non-cancerous throat nodules, and the operation left her unable to sing. She spoke yesterday at a news conference with a team of five doctors and professors from Massachusetts, who head the collaborative research effort which will take into account the latest developments in phonosurgery, voice science, laser technology and tissue engineering.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2001 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
It seems like the ultimate movie no-brainer, casting Julie Andrews as an elegant queen in the sugary Disney comedy "The Princess Diaries. " She was, after all, a reigning queen of musical theater on both sides of the Atlantic for more than four decades, before a botched 1998 throat operation silenced her wonderfully freakish, four-octave singing voice. She's also movie royalty, due to the enduring appeal of her mid-1960s family perennials "Mary Poppins" and "The Sound of Music.
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