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Julius Erving

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SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JULIUS ERVING, Charles Barkley, and Allen Iverson were among the former players who shared their thoughts on the passing of Moses Malone. Malone, who helped lead the Sixers to the 1983 NBA championship, died yesterday morning in his sleep in Norfolk, Va. He was 60. Doctor J tweeted that he was already dealing with the death of his high school coach at Roosevelt (N.Y.) High when he learned of Malone's passing. "Lost Coach Ray Wilson and friend Moses Malone this week," Erving wrote.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julius Erving, one of Philadelphia's most beloved sports legends, returned to the city for the second time in two weeks yesterday to make an impassioned, public plea for help in finding his son, Cory, who has been missing for a month. Before 10 television cameras and with his other sons, Julius 3d and Cheo, by his side, the former 76ers star stood behind a City Hall podium and said what he didn't have to say, what was clear from his face: "We're in pain. " Despite national media exposure, wide-ranging police efforts, and a $50,000 reward, a credible lead has yet to develop in the disappearance of Cory Erving, 19, who lives with his parents at their home near Orlando, Fla. Julius Erving's entire family had attended a June 13 news conference in Philadelphia, but Erving said yesterday that his daughter, Jazmin, 23, "has a broken heart" and that his wife, Turquoise, is "bedridden and in a weakened state with only a framed photo" of Cory to offer her comfort.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jazmin Erving cannot dunk. Never could. Never will. And her father, a fellow who dunked often for the 76ers, really doesn't care. "I hope," Julius Erving said, "that's not the measure of her self- esteem. " Julius Erving need not worry. His daughter does not measure her self-worth by anything she does on a basketball court. She does not measure her self- worth by anything her father did on a basketball court. Jazmin Erving, Episcopal Academy student and athlete, is a person who wants to be known for her own accomplishments.
NEWS
April 16, 1987
There are those people who do much more than break the mold. They redefine excellence. Julius Erving has done that. Erving changed basketball forever. He has been the most spectacularly athletic player ever, seeming to defy the law of gravity along with most of the other laws of physics. All his explosiveness has been combined with a fluid grace that has made him more fun to watch than a barrel of Baryshnikovs. Kids who saw Doctor J play grew up to be Dominique Wilkins and Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
July 2, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Alexander O'Connor, 12, was wearing a white T-shirt with "PENN TENNIS CAMP" in navy blue lettering across the front, and he fell in among a dozen or so other campers who had gathered at the courts behind Franklin Field on Tuesday, all of them wanting autographs from the once-famous tennis player with the famous absentee father. Having joined in with the crowd, he turned his back to the player, and in black marker, she scribbled her first name across the nape of his T-shirt. He started to bound away to catch up with his friends before returning with a question.
SPORTS
April 16, 1987 | By Bill Lyon, Inquirer Sports Columnist
In the summer of 1986, Philadelphia seemed to be losing its sports giants at an alarming rate. The 76ers traded Moses Malone, the Phillies released Steve Carlton, and then, suddenly, Julius Erving was a free agent. No one thought, obviously, that Erving would ever be unemployed as long as he chose to play basketball. Still, abruptly being a man without a team was a prospect he found unsettling. He had never faced such a situation. And so, when other teams, notably the Utah Jazz, expressed an interest, he listened.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | This is a shortened version of a column by Mark Whicker that appeared in the Daily News Dec. 15, 1983
We can be tougher than heck on them, but when all is said and done, we love our sports superstars. Just ask Phillies great Mike Schmidt, who had a love-hate relationship with the boobirds in the stands until the very end of his Hall of Fame career. Or Rich Ashburn and Steve Carlton. Chuck Bednarik and Randall Cunningham. Julius Erving and Charles Barkley. Bobby Clarke. Joe Frazier. You get the idea. Sidney Moncrief, who is 26, was asked about age last night, at least in the way it involved Julius Erving, who is on the 34 side of 33. "He will get old, won't he?"
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer
Julius Erving has said, "That's always been important to me, to shake the image of being a jock. " In the six weeks since Dr. J. took off his high-tops for the last time, there's been a whole lot of shaking going on. Less than a week after Erving played his last game against the Milwaukee Bucks, Gov. Casey put him on the state Economic Development Partnership Board, which is intended to replace the state Commerce Department. Erving the businessman is part owner of Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co., which placed fourth among the nation's top black-owned businesses last year with $110 million in sales, as well as part owner of a Buffalo, N.Y., television station.
SPORTS
December 19, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
BEFORE THE SWOOSH came into his life, Michael Jordan wore Converse. Yesterday a powder-blue pair of leather hightops that he wore at North Carolina sold at auction for $33,387. ESPN.com reported that the sneaks - inscribed "Best Wishes, Michael Jordan" - were consigned to Grey Flannel Auctions by a high school teammate of Jordan's. The winning bidder, who chose to remain anonymous, purchased a nice piece of history. But they are far less valuable that some other Jordan memorabilia.
SPORTS
April 12, 2013 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
AUGUSTA, Ga. - On a property filled with some of the richest and most famous people on the planet, it takes some doing to be the coolest cat in town. Unless you're Doctor J. Julius Erving, a golf addict and fan, attended Thursday's opening round of the Masters, his 12th. As fan favorite Phil Mickelson teed off, dozens of fans alongside the fairway missed Lefty's towering drive; they were fascinated by the towering gent in the gray 76ers hat, red shirt and black slacks. Grown men clustered around Doc to shake his hand as kids pleaded for him to sign programs and hats.
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SPORTS
March 12, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
To longtime 76ers fans, it was a sight to see. Julius Erving graciously and, as always, eloquently speaking to the media when Allen Iverson joined the session and the two shared a couple of bear hugs before Doc planted a kiss on Iverson's forehead. It was a look into the past. Into what had been a great organization on a night when the bridge from past to present continued to be constructed. The 76ers hosted the Sixers Youth Program gala Thursday night on the floor of the Palestra, a charitable event with the proceeds benefiting area children who are less fortunate.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
AFTER THE 76ERS had acquired Julius Erving before the 1976-77 season, the team went on a run of being eliminated in the NBA Finals three times and the Eastern Conference Finals twice in a six-year span. While those teams were composed of other star-level players such as Doug Collins, George McGinnis, Bobby Jones, Darryl Dawkins and Lloyd Free, to name a few, there was an ingredient missing. Billy Cunningham, who took over as head coach before the 1977-78 season, knew exactly what it was. "What we needed was that physical presence," Cunningham said yesterday.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JULIUS ERVING, Charles Barkley, and Allen Iverson were among the former players who shared their thoughts on the passing of Moses Malone. Malone, who helped lead the Sixers to the 1983 NBA championship, died yesterday morning in his sleep in Norfolk, Va. He was 60. Doctor J tweeted that he was already dealing with the death of his high school coach at Roosevelt (N.Y.) High when he learned of Malone's passing. "Lost Coach Ray Wilson and friend Moses Malone this week," Erving wrote.
SPORTS
August 29, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Amid massive expectations, Darryl Dawkins arrived in Philadelphia via Orlando at the age of 18. He was a giant man and a gentleman with a mind so creative that he was able to invent a fictional planet and write poetry that described the otherworldly strength he used to shatter two fiberglass backboards in a little less than a month.. "Darryl Dawkins is the father of power dunking," Shaquille O'Neal once said about the man who was known as "Chocolate Thunder," "Double D," and other image-evoking nicknames.
SPORTS
July 17, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Given their investment in Pierre Jackson, the 76ers' signing of the point guard late Tuesday was a formality. Jackson, who is playing on the club's NBA Summer League team, signed a partially guaranteed four-year contract at a hotel on the Las Vegas Strip. The Sixers acquired Jackson, a former Baylor star, in a 2014 draft-night trade , but he ruptured his right Achilles tendon last summer in the Orlando Pro Summer League. The team released him in September but still gave him a $400,000 deal for his rehabilitation.
SPORTS
July 2, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Alexander O'Connor, 12, was wearing a white T-shirt with "PENN TENNIS CAMP" in navy blue lettering across the front, and he fell in among a dozen or so other campers who had gathered at the courts behind Franklin Field on Tuesday, all of them wanting autographs from the once-famous tennis player with the famous absentee father. Having joined in with the crowd, he turned his back to the player, and in black marker, she scribbled her first name across the nape of his T-shirt. He started to bound away to catch up with his friends before returning with a question.
SPORTS
December 19, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
BEFORE THE SWOOSH came into his life, Michael Jordan wore Converse. Yesterday a powder-blue pair of leather hightops that he wore at North Carolina sold at auction for $33,387. ESPN.com reported that the sneaks - inscribed "Best Wishes, Michael Jordan" - were consigned to Grey Flannel Auctions by a high school teammate of Jordan's. The winning bidder, who chose to remain anonymous, purchased a nice piece of history. But they are far less valuable that some other Jordan memorabilia.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Julius Erving , the airborne forward who led the 76ers to the NBA championship way back in 1983, is 64 years old, and still hustling. Last week, his Dr. J Enterprises cut a deal with Anthem Media Group , of Toronto, New York and Los Angeles, to help sell its Fantasy Sports Network (FNTSY) to such video giants as Comcast, DirecTV and AT&T , and find marketing partnerships with pro leagues and advertisers. Anthem also owns fantasy-sports site RotoExperts.com , combat-sports-oriented Fight Network , SportsGrid.com (sports commentary)
SPORTS
October 30, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
EXPECTATIONS are low for the Sixers, who open their season against the Pacers tonight. Which makes leafing through Sports Illustrated's coffee-table book, "Basketball's Greatest," a nice distraction. The Sixers are well-represented in the book, which ranks the 10 best players and coaches in numerous categories. Best shooting guard goes, of course, to Michael Jordan. But Allen Iverson is ranked sixth, ahead of George Gervin (seventh) and Oscar Robertson (eighth). Larry Bird is named best small forward, followed by LeBron James and Julius Erving.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caldwell Jones, a rail-thin frontcourt player who helped the 76ers reach the NBA Finals three times, died Sunday of a heart attack in Decatur, Ga. Mr. Jones, 64, was one of four brothers to reach the NBA after playing at Albany State College. He began his career with the San Diego Conquistadors of the ABA in 1973 before joining the 76ers in 1976. Mr. Jones, who retired from the NBA in 1990, played six seasons with the Sixers before he was traded to the Houston Rockets. He also played for Chicago, Portland and San Antonio in a 14-year NBA career.
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