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Juneteenth

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NEWS
January 1, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, Camden has had its own Puerto Rican heritage parade, better known as the San Juan Bautista parade. Now the city's African American Advisory Commission has announced plans for an African American heritage parade as part of what it terms Camden's first celebration of the annual Juneteenth independence day. Mangaliso Davis, an official with the commission - which seeks to advance understanding of black culture - said the announcement was...
NEWS
June 19, 2006 | Guy Ciarrocchi
Guy Ciarrocchi lives in Paoli Today, June 19, all Americans should pause, reflect and celebrate. On June 19, 1865, 30 months after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston. He claimed U.S. sovereignty over the Texas territory and formally read the Emancipation Proclamation. Texas was the last place in America to learn of the president's order, and "Juneteenth" is the name of the celebration that followed.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Community activists and others marked Juneteenth at City Hall on Tuesday by announcing plans for a 2013 African Heritage Parade to mark next June as African American Heritage Month in Philadelphia. In a prayer at the start of the half-hour program in the Mayor's Reception Room, Marilyn Kai Jewett, a Yoruba priest and community activist, said: "This program will help our people to understand who they are, especially our children to know who they are with their great history, which begins in Africa, not in America in slavery.
NEWS
June 20, 2006 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the sounds of a brass band and escorted by a squad of black soldiers in 19th-century uniforms, an icon of American history rolled through Center City in a horse-drawn carriage yesterday. A rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, bearing authentic signatures of Abraham Lincoln and William Seward, his secretary of state, arrived at the African American Museum in Philadelphia at Seventh and Arch Streets, in honor of the museum's 30th anniversary and the African American celebration of Juneteenth.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
In playful embrace, Ulise Monroe (left) and her sister, Jimella, celebrate at Juneteenth in West Philadelphia. The festival yesterday commemorated an emancipation of slaves in Texas in 1865.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
My husband and I jumped the broom on Juneteenth 1983. Translated, that means my husband and I wed on June 19, 28 years ago. It also means both of us are old, but that's probably fodder for an AARP column. The point is, both Juneteenth and the broom hold important cultural and historical significance among American Americans. The centuries-old tradition of jumping the broom stems back to slavery, when enslaved African Americans, whose masters often prohibited them from marrying, ceremoniously jumped over broom, symbolizing settling into a new life together.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community activists and others marked Juneteenth at City Hall on Tuesday by announcing plans for a 2013 African Heritage Parade to mark next June as African American Heritage Month in Philadelphia. In a prayer at the start of the half-hour program in the Mayor's Reception Room, Marilyn Kai Jewett, a Yoruba priest and community activist, said: "This program will help our people to understand who they are, especially our children to know who they are with their great history, which begins in Africa, not in America in slavery.
NEWS
June 19, 2009
A new exhibit on the African American experience in post-colonial Philadelphia offers a largely untold perspective on the city's rich history. Opening today at the African American Museum at Seventh and Arch Streets, the exhibit marks a drastic turning point in how U.S. history is typically told. "Audacious Freedom: African Americans In Philadelphia, 1776-1876" is the first permanent exhibit at the museum narrating an epic sweep stretching from slavery to the post-Civil War era. It includes two galleries and engaging life-size videos.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* LIDIA CELEBRATES AMERICA: FREEDOM AND INDEPENDENCE. 10 p.m. tomorrow, WHYY12.   LIDIA BASTIANICH knows how to party. In "Freedom and Independence," the latest installment of "Lidia Celebrates America," the chef, cookbook author and longtime PBS host brings viewers along for a trip that takes her from a Fourth of July naturalization ceremony at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello to the marking of Juneteenth - also known as Emancipation Day...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly four decades ago, early on Sunday, July 2, 1961, in his Ketchum, Idaho, cabin, a physically and emotionally defeated Ernest Hemingway placed a Boss double-barreled shotgun into his mouth and fired twice. He left a widow, three sons, and several unfinished manuscripts, many of which the Nobel laureate deemed unsuitable for publication. This July, the 21st to be precise, is the centennial anniversary of Hemingway's birth, an event that is being commemorated with: a hometown celebration in Oak Park, Ill., complete with "a movable feast" at local restaurants; the Thomasville Furniture Hemingway Collection (four lines: Kenya, Ketchum, Key West and Havana)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the shadow of Charleston, scores gathered in Germantown on Saturday to celebrate the events of a day 150 years ago - the freeing of slaves on American soil. People met near the spot where the first protest against slavery was written, joined a loud, drum-banging march up and down hilly Germantown Avenue, and fell silent at emotional reenactments of the plight of those who had been held in servitude. They called out the names of ancestors and remembered those whose names have been lost.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was known variously as Alice, Alice of Dunk's Ferry, Black Alice, or Old Alice. She was a slave who lived at least 108 years - some say 116 - and saw three centuries. She never learned how to read or write, and never gained her freedom, but her head was filled with priceless memories. Alice could tell a story like no one else - whether it was about meeting William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania; witnessing the early days of Philadelphia; or navigating boats between Dunk's Ferry - now Beverly - and what is now Bensalem.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* LIDIA CELEBRATES AMERICA: FREEDOM AND INDEPENDENCE. 10 p.m. tomorrow, WHYY12.   LIDIA BASTIANICH knows how to party. In "Freedom and Independence," the latest installment of "Lidia Celebrates America," the chef, cookbook author and longtime PBS host brings viewers along for a trip that takes her from a Fourth of July naturalization ceremony at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello to the marking of Juneteenth - also known as Emancipation Day...
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community activists and others marked Juneteenth at City Hall on Tuesday by announcing plans for a 2013 African Heritage Parade to mark next June as African American Heritage Month in Philadelphia. In a prayer at the start of the half-hour program in the Mayor's Reception Room, Marilyn Kai Jewett, a Yoruba priest and community activist, said: "This program will help our people to understand who they are, especially our children to know who they are with their great history, which begins in Africa, not in America in slavery.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Community activists and others marked Juneteenth at City Hall on Tuesday by announcing plans for a 2013 African Heritage Parade to mark next June as African American Heritage Month in Philadelphia. In a prayer at the start of the half-hour program in the Mayor's Reception Room, Marilyn Kai Jewett, a Yoruba priest and community activist, said: "This program will help our people to understand who they are, especially our children to know who they are with their great history, which begins in Africa, not in America in slavery.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
My husband and I jumped the broom on Juneteenth 1983. Translated, that means my husband and I wed on June 19, 28 years ago. It also means both of us are old, but that's probably fodder for an AARP column. The point is, both Juneteenth and the broom hold important cultural and historical significance among American Americans. The centuries-old tradition of jumping the broom stems back to slavery, when enslaved African Americans, whose masters often prohibited them from marrying, ceremoniously jumped over broom, symbolizing settling into a new life together.
NEWS
June 19, 2009
A new exhibit on the African American experience in post-colonial Philadelphia offers a largely untold perspective on the city's rich history. Opening today at the African American Museum at Seventh and Arch Streets, the exhibit marks a drastic turning point in how U.S. history is typically told. "Audacious Freedom: African Americans In Philadelphia, 1776-1876" is the first permanent exhibit at the museum narrating an epic sweep stretching from slavery to the post-Civil War era. It includes two galleries and engaging life-size videos.
NEWS
June 20, 2006 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the sounds of a brass band and escorted by a squad of black soldiers in 19th-century uniforms, an icon of American history rolled through Center City in a horse-drawn carriage yesterday. A rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, bearing authentic signatures of Abraham Lincoln and William Seward, his secretary of state, arrived at the African American Museum in Philadelphia at Seventh and Arch Streets, in honor of the museum's 30th anniversary and the African American celebration of Juneteenth.
NEWS
June 19, 2006 | Guy Ciarrocchi
Guy Ciarrocchi lives in Paoli Today, June 19, all Americans should pause, reflect and celebrate. On June 19, 1865, 30 months after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston. He claimed U.S. sovereignty over the Texas territory and formally read the Emancipation Proclamation. Texas was the last place in America to learn of the president's order, and "Juneteenth" is the name of the celebration that followed.
NEWS
June 20, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On Jan. 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves. It took until June 19, 1865, for word to reach Galveston, Texas. When it did, the former slaves flooded the streets to celebrate their new freedom. Yesterday, after two years of planning, the African American Advisory Commission of Camden celebrated the event, known as Juneteenth. "People have been asking to do it for years," said Mangaliso Davis, chairman of the commission. "It shows the harmony between the groups in Camden.
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