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NEWS
June 16, 1989 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN / DAILY NEWS
Three members of the national touring company of "Cats" gave a window- view performance at John Wanamaker's at Market and Juniper streets yesterday. The "cats" lounged, lazed, and purred for passers-by to promote the show at the Mann Music Center that ends tomorrow.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
Philadelphia's new Criminal Justice Center opened this week at Juniper and Filbert Streets. The $120 million steel-frame building has a base clad with granite and limestone, and upper floors of precast concrete panels. It has won good reviews for aesthetics and atmosphere, along with complaints about opening-day glitches.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
A PROMENADE OF UMBRELLAS at Juniper and Chestnut Streets in Center City symbolizes a dreary week as rain dampens the region for a fifth consecutive day. The rainfall was light but steady as the week's total increased to nearly nine-tenths of an inch, more than half of it yesterday. But relief was in sight, with no precipitation expected from today through Monday.
NEWS
March 18, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Angelo Lanci, a renowned South Philadelphia baker who wouldn't cut corners to make a profit or cut ties to the neighborhood he loved. Lanci, who died Friday, was 86 and lived in South Philadelphia. Lanci's Bakery, an institution in South Philadelphia since 1920, gave jobs to countless neighborhood kids over four decades. Some of those were the children of parents who received free bread from Lanci during the Depression. Raised in Lanciano, Italy, he served in the Italian army as an infantryman during World War I and was decorated for bravery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: It's summertime again, so everybody's drinking gin-and-tonics. Ugh. Why anybody would drink something that smells like Pine-Sol is beyond me. Makes me queasy just thinking about it. Marnie: Believe it or not, Buzz, modern gin traces its roots to a 17th-century Dutch remedy for upset stomachs, among other ailments. Alcoholic tinctures of botanical ingredients were common medicines. Juniper berries were thought to help kidney problems, gallstones and the gout, too. Buzz: So how come people still drink it?
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gus "Mr. Silk" Lacy, 72, the unofficial mayor of 52d Street and owner of Philadelphia's former premier supper club, Mr. Silk's 3rd Base, died of pneumonia Wednesday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In the 1960s, when jazz and African American nightlife pretty much left Center City, they were reincarnated at 52d and Spruce Streets. Mr. Lacy's motto for his club, which was popular with blacks and whites from all over the city and beyond, was: "You have to touch 3rd Base before you go home.
NEWS
July 30, 2011
A mob of teenagers injured at least two people and robbed others during a brief rampage Friday night in Center City, police said. At least five teens were arrested. About 9:15 p.m., police started receiving 911 calls of a group of 20 to 40 teens assaulting people. At Juniper and Walnut Streets, police found a man bleeding profusely from the head. He was being treated at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A street robbery was reported at 16th and Spruce Streets, police said.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia police officer and three other men were ordered held for trial yesterday on assault charges stemming from an incident in May in which they allegedly attacked two men on a Center City street because they believed them to be gay. The former officer, Thomas Duffy, 26, of the 3000 block of Windish Street in the city's Holmesburg section, had been on the police force for more than five years until May 17, when he was arrested about...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Herbert Pullinger (1878-1961), one of Philadelphia's most prominent printmakers during the first half of this century, created definitive interpretations of city landmarks with a skill and sensitivity that haven't paled with the passage of time. The Atwater Kent Museum, which focuses on the city's history, has organized an exhibition of 40 prints and drawings by Pullinger that include industrial subjects, such as the Baldwin Locomotive Works, as well as more familiar motifs in Center City, such as the old Broad Street Station and the former Evening Bulletin building at Juniper and Filbert Streets.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
A 47-year-old ex-convict was sentenced yesterday to 3 1/2 to 7 years in prison for pushing and threatening to kill his former lawyer in Center City. Leonard Chaplin, of Montrose Street near 12th, whose crime history includes a 1974 murder conviction, was jailed by Muncipal Judge Mario F. Driggs. Assistant District Attorney Marilyn Davidson said Chaplin attacked attorney Samuel Stretton at Juniper and Walnut streets on Sept. 23, 1985. Stretton had represented Chaplin in an appeal of a contempt-of-court conviction.
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NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
A snippet of Zoe Scofield's choreography was seen last fall at the FringeArts Festival in a piece commissioned for Pennsylvania Ballet dancers. With her BeginAgain opening at FringeArts on Thursday night, Scofield and her company Zoe | Juniper present an evening length dance that ranged from tender and mysterious to fearless and mean, but always retained an eerie dreaminess of self and otherness. Visual artist and Scofield's partner in art and life, Juniper Shuey, makes up the other half of the Seattle-based Zoe | Juniper.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let's cut to the big question: Should I change all my passwords? Answer: Yes, but not right this moment. Millions of people are asking the italicized question above. Why? Because a terrible thing has been happening to the Web, for two years, without detection, and it affects most people who use it. It's called the Heartbleed Bug. Its discovery was announced Monday, jointly, by folks at Google and those at a Finnish company called Codenomicon. We will explain the name below, but focus for now on the Bug. Many of the major servers and websites on the Internet - meaning "most of the ones you use" - depend on a protocol that protects information.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PIECE BY PIECE, the six towering marble columns that for years had graced the Old York Road entrance to Albert Einstein Medical Center have carefully been reinstalled at the Logan campus. The Greek columns, each 24 feet tall and 3 feet wide, are known as the Strickland Columns. They had been part of the now-demolished Second United States Mint, built in 1829 on Chestnut Street near Juniper, which was designed by the architect William Strickland. The mint was sold in 1902, but the Ionic-style columns were donated to Einstein in 1904.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: It's summertime again, so everybody's drinking gin-and-tonics. Ugh. Why anybody would drink something that smells like Pine-Sol is beyond me. Makes me queasy just thinking about it. Marnie: Believe it or not, Buzz, modern gin traces its roots to a 17th-century Dutch remedy for upset stomachs, among other ailments. Alcoholic tinctures of botanical ingredients were common medicines. Juniper berries were thought to help kidney problems, gallstones and the gout, too. Buzz: So how come people still drink it?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2012
ZOE BY BILLBOARD 1. La Corona, Reed Street & Passyunk Avenue. January-February: Antoinette Conti; March-April: Fernando Trevino. 2. I Love You, 25th Street & Washington Avenue. 3. Woman Kissing Baby, 33rd Street & Grays Ferry Avenue. 4. Three Mile Island, 34th Street & Grays Ferry Avenue. 5. Nila Holding Shirt, 34th Street & Grays Ferry Avenue. 6. Together We Make Dreams Come True, 49th Street & Paschall Avenue. 7. Submerged Car in Swamp, 47th Street & Grays Ferry Avenue.
NEWS
July 30, 2011
A mob of teenagers injured at least two people and robbed others during a brief rampage Friday night in Center City, police said. At least five teens were arrested. About 9:15 p.m., police started receiving 911 calls of a group of 20 to 40 teens assaulting people. At Juniper and Walnut Streets, police found a man bleeding profusely from the head. He was being treated at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A street robbery was reported at 16th and Spruce Streets, police said.
FOOD
October 7, 2010
Wednesday, Oct. 13 Healthy survivorship , a program on the benefits of a healthy diet for cancer patients. Free. 6-7 p.m. at the Wellness Community of Philadelphia, the Suzanne Morgan Center at Ridgeland, 4100 Chamounix Drive, Fairmount Park, www.twcp.org . Reservations required no later than Oct. 11; 215-879-7733. Beer and cheese pairing and tasting , with craft and specialty beer expert Adrienne Yanak, whose offerings will include autumn pale ale, gold lager, pilsner, extra special gold lager, and more; and Hunter Fike, who will present cheeses from DiBruno Bros.
NEWS
August 19, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William A. Bushnell, 67, of Medford, a devoted father who supported 10 children by designing boiler systems and selling real estate, died of kidney cancer Friday at Samaritan Inpatient Hospice Center in Mount Holly. Born in 1940 in Brier Hill, a hamlet south of Morristown, N.Y., Mr. Bushnell worked with his father in the family hardware store. "He learned about tools and what do with them at an early age," said daughter Regina Donohue. After graduating from high school, Mr. Bushnell earned an associate's degree in mechanical engineering in 1960 from the State University of New York at Canton Agricultural and Technical College.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2005 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by American policy in Iraq and other Muslim countries, a Philadelphia banker hopes to organize Americans around what he calls "a thoughtful response" to terrorism. "We have low growth, rising interest rates, oil has touched $70 a barrel, the federal deficit has reached historical highs, and we're gonna spend $1.3 trillion" on a war in Iraq that is creating "new generations of terrorists," says Richard W. Vague, chairman of Juniper Financial Corp. and former head of the nation's largest credit card operation.
NEWS
June 17, 2005 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to cartoons, inspiration is everything, as two new animated series prove. An imaginative concept can overcome a variety of flaws, but a derivative conceit is doomed right from the drawing board. The title character of the Disney Channel's fanciful The Buzz on Maggie, which debuts tonight at 8, reminds me of Gwen Stefani. Sure, she's got antennae and four arms, but you kind of expect that from a housefly. The point is she's feisty and fashionable. Maggie and the rest of the Pesky family live in Stickyfeet, a bug burg nestled in the city dump.
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