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Junk

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NEWS
March 2, 2000 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Auto Writer
You can see all kinds of junk lying on the edges of a super highway like I-95. What you can't see is what happens in the fleeting seconds that some of that junk is airborne. Flying wheels have killed two people in almost the same section of I-95 in Northeast Philadelphia in the last two weeks. And even if government statistics indicate the risk of dying from highway debris is minimal, people like Frank Graff have reason to believe the contrary. "You name it and we've found it out there," said Graff, maintenance manager of PennDOT's Philadelphia district office.
LIVING
July 25, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Why settle for merely functional when you can have fashionable, too? Sonia Lucano shows how to turn everyday objects and throwaway items into things of beauty in ReMake ReStyle ReUse (Watson-Guptill, $19.95). For example, she beautifies plain white ceramic plates by painting on a simple design of branches, and dresses up a mirror with etching. Kindred spirits Sue Whitney and Ki Nassauer are junkies and proud of it. In Junk Beautiful: Room by Room Makeovers With Junkmarket Style (Taunton, $21.95)
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Discarded Fisher-Price little people, battered license plates, buckles and old lunch boxes may seem like junk, but to Leo Sewell they're gold. Sewell, 40, who is called "the junkman," constructs animals and people from what he calls found objects and creates a unique form of sculpture. The Philadelphia artist is perhaps best known to area residents for his elephant sculpture at the Please Touch Museum for children in Phladelphia. On Monday, Sewell visited the Devon Elementary School to help celebrate the school's Arts Express Week.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Ron Klein is a junk junkie. He loves looking for it, talking about it, rummaging through it and buying it. He even has a business card that lists his profession as "trash expert. " And when he's done finding other people's junk, he loves to turn it into art. "It's almost genetic," the 40-year-old Jenkintown resident said with a laugh. "Somewhere deep down in my DNA it says I like to find things and make things - inventions - even if they don't work. It's taken me a long time to arrive at this point in my life.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
For the third exhibition in this season's Challenge series at the Fleisher Art Memorial, sculptor Roger Laib has built a multimedia environment out of junk and thin pieces of wood that continually engages one's senses without completely giving up all of its secrets. A Shakedown to a Split Decision is a conglomeration of miscellaneous discards such as broken lawn chairs, bicycle wheels, crutches, wheelchair parts, toy wagons, ladders, pool cues and ski poles integrated into a deceptively rigid framework of sticks.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Even if you don't celebrate the holidays, Brian Sanders' JUNK's 1.1 Holiday Revue Special will make you want to celebrate something, or just get drunk and fall down like the elongated, shabby clown featured in a skit late in the program. JUNK's 60-foot-high Christian Street performance space is in a portion of the sprawling Shiloh Baptist Church, and Sanders' dancers float, flop, and fly through every inch of it. With comedic timing and acrobatic elegance, JUNK proves it is one of the best aerial troupes in the country.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neither Christmastime nor summer vacation brings as much joy and anticipation to Mary Lou Piecyk as the first week of June. "This is the best week of the year, no doubt about it," she said as she carried a '50s-era makeup case to the sidewalk and plopped it atop a growing pile of detritus that until recently had been stuffed into closets and drawers in her house. "I'm off, too, so I can really enjoy it. " What Piecyk was so excited about was Narberth's "junk week," as it's known, when residents look at the rubbish-filled refuse stations that used to be their homes and start hauling the dross out to the curb for a weeklong communal uncluttering.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Laurie Kalmanson, Special to The Inquirer
The restaurant banquettes, stacks of aluminum siding and rolls of broadloom that made Emery J. Zold's front lawn look like a combination diner and salvage yard were declared illegal last week by Gloucester Township Municipal Court Judge Angelo DiCamillo. After a five-hour hearing Tuesday night, Zold, 51, was found guilty of 45 counts of having junk on his lawn - one count for each day since the township began accumulating numbered, dated photographs of his property. He was given the maximum penalty: a $22,500 fine and 30 days in jail.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long ago a man, dragging someone else's metal screen door and swearing it was his, made his way into the rutted, dirty yard of the Darby Recycling Co. Jack Crain, the manager of the yard - and a man who prides himself on judging people as well as junk - said he looked the man over and decided to ask where he had gotten the door. The man insisted it was his, and Crain said he finally decided he had no reason to doubt him - "they've always got the excuse. " Crain bought the door for $6. The tale might have ended there, but within a half-hour a distraught Darby Borough resident turned up at the yard, complaining that someone had stolen his door, Crain recalled.
NEWS
August 2, 2005 | By Marybeth T. Hagan
On Friday, look for Nancy Viau's weekly report about this summer at the Shore. Every once in a while, I have a hunger for junk. Never mind summer treats like chocolate chocolate-chip ice cream. I'm talking about the media relief I seek from reading and writing about serious stuff. When I found myself purchasing the New York Post several days in a row, I knew that my appetite for light summer fare was in full swing. It was not the hysterical headlines or lively news reports that I craved from this Big Apple tabloid.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Nearly 500 miles in the sky above northern Siberia, two satellites collided with violent force Feb. 10, 2009, shattering into at least 2,000 fragments that continue to orbit Earth. And those are just the ones we know about. Scientists estimate there are hundreds of thousands of undetected objects in space resulting from collisions such as that one, and from the deterioration of old rocket boosters, dead satellites, and other stray hardware. That is the reason behind a squat, white structure that opened this year near Route 38 in Moorestown, at the South Jersey campus of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Citing the likelihood of another impasse over the next state budget, Moody's Investor Services has affirmed its negative credit rating for the Philadelphia School District. Moody's highlighted the district's recent efforts to stabilize the finances of the city's schools. But the credit opinion released Friday said that the continued "Ba3" rating for the district's debt "reflects the continued uncertainty surrounding" the state budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 and the potential impact it could have on the district's finances and ability to borrow money.
NEWS
April 3, 2016
Mayer Hawthorne, Man About Town; The Lumineers, Cleopatra; Deftones, Gore; M83, Junk
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
The junk man tuned his radio to the classical station and considered his bare windows. As Beethoven's Creatures of Prometheus climbed to its crescendo, the junk man posed to himself questions befitting an artist: "What I am trying to do? What am I going to say?" In each empty shelf the junk man saw a blank canvas. A chance to pick through his piles of baubles and bric-a-brac - and make a statement. It is the junk man's fun. But in the rush and roar of a metropolis, the junk man's windows also serve as small markers of time's endless march.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
U.S. investors squeezed by low bond yields and discouraged by the volatile stock market have pumped more than $50 billion into business development companies, or BDCs, in the last 10 years, in hopes of earning more. BDCs typically invest in debt sold by U.S. middle-market companies, including private-equity merger targets, energy-development projects, and mainstream companies that don't qualify for cheap bank loans. For the hope of higher, steadier interest yields, BDC investors often pay high broker fees.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
First things first: The theater is un-air-conditioned and may be 80 degrees or more. You sit on huge bales of straw, covered with horse blankets if you choose to keep the sharp bits at bay. The second floor of South Philadelphia's Shiloh Baptist Church has become a barn to house Brian Sanders/JUNK's performance of American Standard , the company's Fringe Festival offering this year. The setting may not be comfortable, but it's worth it to see Sanders' wacky Seven Brides for Seven Brothers -type show, which runs through Sept.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Even if you don't celebrate the holidays, Brian Sanders' JUNK's 1.1 Holiday Revue Special will make you want to celebrate something, or just get drunk and fall down like the elongated, shabby clown featured in a skit late in the program. JUNK's 60-foot-high Christian Street performance space is in a portion of the sprawling Shiloh Baptist Church, and Sanders' dancers float, flop, and fly through every inch of it. With comedic timing and acrobatic elegance, JUNK proves it is one of the best aerial troupes in the country.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
This nation's first Supreme Court was an appointed court. President George Washington selected John Jay of New York as its first chief justice and, as his associates, John Blair of Virginia, William Cushing of Massachusetts, James Wilson of Pennsylvania, James Iredell of North Carolina, and John Rutledge of South Carolina. That first panel, established by Congress in 1789, set the standard not only for its successors, but for each state supreme court as it was created. There have been many honorable courts along the way, and many distinguished justices.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Brian Sanders' new show, Suspended , opened with a gala Thursday night during Neighborhood Fringe at the headquarters of his troupe, JUNK, at Shiloh Baptist Church. The aging, dilapidated church, having given over its soaring nave to Partners for Sacred Places, is perfect for Sanders' company to build its skyscraper scaffolding and bungee-cord rigging. But Lordy, I sure hope the church elders don't catch drift of what's going on in there. The scandalous nature of the "Locker Room Pre-Show" - Theodore Fatcher, Peter Jones, and Tommy Schimmel frolicking bathhouse-style in wooden barrels - had me gobsmacked.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
This being spring, the season of renewal, the idea was to be a good citizen, clean the block, rent a truck, and haul the trash to a designated sanitation site. Or so Celia Pretter believed. "I thought I was doing a community service, doing this all nice and legal," the Mount Airy horticulturist said. She wanted to help, "given that the city is in crisis and has no money for schools. " But logic quickly took a backseat to red tape, time was wasted, officials were phoned, funds were squandered, and, truth be told, emotions flared and unkind words were uttered.
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