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Junkets

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NEWS
September 14, 1986
The New Jersey Casino Control Commission needs to take a fresh look at junkets bringing high rollers to Atlantic City in the wake of the recent indictments of 17 people by a state grand jury in Trenton. They are charged with falsifying records, operating junkets without a license and conspiring to control junket operations illegally. Some of the accused allegedly have organized-crime associations. When the state Legislature was debating the proposed provisions of the Casino Control Act in 1977 there was considerable sentiment for outlawing junkets, but that view unfortunately did not prevail.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democrat John Innelli's subjects were PACs, junkets and franks - the kind that go on mail, not the dinner table. And not once - well, only once, and then very briefly - did Innelli denounce U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon's role at the Partnership for Economic Development, the now-defunct agency under investigation by the FBI. But in the uphill campaign faced by the Delaware County Democrat, Innelli wasn't going to call the press together without taking...
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | by Carl Mayer, New York Times
Next time you write a check for state or local taxes, ponder how much of your money will be spent to support the gambling and drinking activities of the people you elect. At a time of tightening state and local budgets across the country, the taxpayer-financed junket remains one of the few expenses no one touches. My experience as a neophyte elected official illustrates the phenomenon. As a new town committeeman, my first official appearance would be at the annual New Jersey State League of Municipalities convention in Atlantic City.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A bill that would impose strict limits on free meals, free tickets, free trips and other gifts to members of Congress was inching last night toward Senate passage. All gifts would be banned, except presents from family or close friends. The proposal also would put a halt to most privately paid junkets for members to vacation resorts, including charity golf, tennis or ski outings. The bill initially contained a $20 limit on meals and other gifts that lawmakers could accept from nonlobbyists.
NEWS
March 25, 1986 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether stomping around a federal courtroom or hunching over a lectern or ripping a copy of an indictment in half, Philadelphia defense attorney Robert F. Simone fought hard yesterday for his client - himself. "You're going to have a tough time keeping your eye on the ball," Simone told a jury in Camden yesterday. "Is it (the trial) about organized crime or is it about Mr. Simone committing perjury?" Simone, 52, stands accused of lying while under oath about his knowledge of the inner workings of the Philadelphia-South Jersey organized-crime family reputedly headed by Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo during a hearing on Oct. 16, 1984, in Newark, Essex County.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | By MARILYN W. THOMPSON, New York Daily News
Special interest groups learned long ago that the way to win the heart of GOP vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle was through his golf clubs. Quayle, an avid golfer with an estimated $50 million personal fortune, regularly has been treated to free trips to luxury resorts by corporate sponsors and lobbying groups. Although Quayle's golf junkets do not appear to violate Senate ethics rules, experts say the activities of the junior senator from Indiana represent the hottest trend in Washington influence-peddling and stretch the limits of rules on travel and gifts.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prominent Atlantic City casino executive was charged yesterday by New Jersey gaming regulators with sharing more than $300,000 in kickbacks and bribes from a now-defunct Pennsylvania charter airline company and from a New York City-based bus junket operator. Willard C. "Bucky" Howard, vice president of casino operations for Trump's Castle Hotel & Casino, was named in a complaint filed by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement that seeks the revocation of his casino key-employee license.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Most people can only dream of going on the really cool corporate junkets, the ones where you get to soak up the rays on a gorgeous beach, bash a white ball around a famous course and do a lot of four-star wining and dining, all on someone else's dime. But serving on the board of the Philadelphia pension fund is like a dream come true for some of its members. Several members of that board - particularly the people who sit on it representing city unions - seem to be among the most well-traveled, well-fed board members in the nation.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
An undercover FBI agent who once posed as a casino junketeer told a jury yesterday that attorney Robert F. "Bobby" Simone had suggested with a hand signal that a union official would have to be paid off. Agent Ronald J. Moretti's testimony came in federal court at the racketeering trial of Simone, a longtime defender of area Mafiosi, and of co- defendant Anthony S. DiSalvo, a reputed mob-associated loanshark. Moretti said he met Simone in 1983 in Simone's law office in Philadelphia to discuss problems Moretti was having getting junkets into Atlantic City casinos.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Kurzband said he knew that there was money - big money - to be made shuttling big-spending gamblers to Atlantic City's casinos. All he had to do, he said, was make arrangements with the mob and there would be kickbacks for him. But he had a problem. Yesterday, when audio tapes were played in the Camden federal perjury trial of Philadelphia defense lawyer Robert F. Simone, the jury listened to what Kurzband's problem was: With all the mob bloodshed on Philadelphia streets in the late 1970s and early 1980s, how would Kurzband, who was hired in 1981 as a consultant by Resorts International Casino Hotel to promote its gambling by arranging junkets, know which was the right mob?
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NEWS
November 17, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
A WEEK AFTER returning from a 10-day trip to the United Kingdom and Israel, Mayor Nutter is taking his act on the road once more. Nutter on Monday will join a trip led by Vice President Joe Biden to tour the Panama Canal's expansion project, which the city is hoping will boost business at Philly's port. "There is great potential to increase economic activity at our port and create good-wage-paying jobs for Philadelphians," Nutter said in a statement. Nutter has traveled a lot in the past year, with trips to China, Italy, New Orleans, Las Vegas, Chicago and many others.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AN UPPER DARBY mother faces criminal charges after leaving her 6-year-old daughter home alone so that she could take a bus to New York City to "de-stress," police said. Shawn Kersey, 35, is one of two Delaware County women who allegedly left their kids home alone last Friday and didn't return until police began to ask questions. According to Upper Darby Superintendent Michael Chitwood, Kersey left on a bus bound for the Big Apple well before her daughter went to school. At 8 a.m., Kersey allegedly called her little girl and told her to go to the school-bus stop.
NEWS
November 29, 2010
IN THIS SEASON of thanks, hope, joy and light, I really do try to be a tad tolerant of politicians and the things they do. But, brother, do they make it tough. Take John Street. No, I mean it, take him. As the Daily News reported Friday, the former mayor is quoted in Philadelphia magazine calling Mayor Nutter "incredibly arrogant, incompetent and offensive. " Really? First of all, if Street had a coat of arms, "arrogant, incompetent and offensive" would be its motto.
NEWS
June 21, 2009 | By Rick Nichols INQUIRER FOOD COLUMNIST
Stephen Starr took the boys (and a couple of girls) out for pizza Thursday. At 9:41 in the morning. For a clam pie, in New Haven, Conn., for goodness' sake, four hours and change by jouncing shuttle bus from his offices over the Continental in Old City. In the gray, drumming rain. He was so hungry by the time he got there that he did what any famished pizza-eater would do: He promptly, and with rueful chagrin, burned the roof of his mouth. And that was just pizzeria Numero Uno. There were four more to come on this gonzo pizza tour - back down in New York's East Village, and in Brooklyn, the harp wires of the bridge going hazy in the fading light.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Clyde bellies up to the bar at the Franklin Fountain, the throwback ice-cream emporium in Old City, his paws on the marble counter, poised to take a triple-dip sundae in a single lick. Clyde ignores all questions about his Marley & Me costars Owen Wilson and Jennifer Aniston, although it is a widely circulated rumor that he got, um, overly friendly with Jen's favorite sweater. Clyde is, in every meaning of the word, a dog. It required six actors (including Cate Blanchett and Heath Ledger)
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five months after taking a trip to South Africa subsidized by an education-software firm, two Philadelphia School District officials signed off on a $926,000 no-bid contract with that company. The 10-day excursion in June 2004, which included a safari and a dinner hosted by a Zulu king, was paid for in part by Plato Learning Inc., one of the nation's biggest education software dealers. The officials - chief academic officer Gregory E. Thornton, the district's number-two executive, and administrator Rosalind Chivis - were directly involved in the decision to buy the software from Plato without bidding.
NEWS
May 9, 2005
The furor over House Majority Leader Tom DeLay's trip to Britain is only the most glaring example of why Congress needs to crack down on privately funded travel by its members. If DeLay's golfing junket to Scotland in 2000 was indeed paid in part by a lobbyist, it violated House ethics rules. DeLay's ethical problems, however, are just part of a larger issue: Members of both parties increasingly accept free trips hither and yon courtesy of private groups, with scant scrutiny or justification.
NEWS
July 26, 2003
New Jersey Gov. Jim McGreevey shows remarkably clear ethical vision on his return flights from political junkets. It's his clouded judgment at the departure gate that is so mystifying. McGreevey, whose popularity has undergone a little turbulence, took his wife and child to Puerto Rico earlier this week on the dime of the International Longshoremen's Association. The union contributed to his campaign. The best thing that can be said for the union-funded "trade mission" is that it was legal.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Most people can only dream of going on the really cool corporate junkets, the ones where you get to soak up the rays on a gorgeous beach, bash a white ball around a famous course and do a lot of four-star wining and dining, all on someone else's dime. But serving on the board of the Philadelphia pension fund is like a dream come true for some of its members. Several members of that board - particularly the people who sit on it representing city unions - seem to be among the most well-traveled, well-fed board members in the nation.
NEWS
April 2, 2002 | By ALBA MARTINEZ
THE Department of Human Services is charged with protecting Philadelphia's children from abuse and neglect while keeping our most fragile families united and strong. The work can be emotionally draining and burnout is commonplace. Retaining and attracting qualified social workers is a constant challenge. Over the last two years, DHS has implemented an aggressive and highly successful recruitment campaign to fill the many vacancies in the department. One facet of this campaign was directly targeted at recruiting bilingual candidates to better assist the growing need for Spanish-speaking social workers.
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