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Junkyard

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NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
The Glassboro Borough Council on Tuesday night tabled a proposed ordinance to allow a third junkyard in the borough after several residents who live near the only applicant for the third license objected. "They are concerned that this will cause a devaluation of their homes and the water table would be endangered from the possibility of pollution seeping in from the junked cars," said Martin Margolet, a Camden attorney representing six people who live near Pete Clark & Sons Auto Body on East High Street, the applicant.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | By Caroline Burns, Special to The Inquirer
The Westampton Township Zoning Board of Adjustment unanimously voted last night to grant a zoning variance to William Denning, owner of Denning's Garage on Rancocas Road, to construct a 30-by-50-foot, one-story concrete block addition. The variance was granted with the stipulation that Denning enclose his junkyard with a 6-foot fence and maintain an existing fence of trees. Residents surrounding the 38-year-old business have been protesting the addition and requesting that Denning clean up the business and fence in the junkyard, which they say is unsafe.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two hundred firefighters last night were battling a huge junkyard blaze on the edge of the environmentally sensitive Pinelands, about 15 miles north of Atlantic City. The fire at Cramer's Auto Wreckers, on Route 542 in Burlington County, was reported at 1 p.m. yesterday. The fire fed on old crankcase oil, gasoline in old fuel tanks, and stacks of tires. As night fell, the billowing, thick black smoke that could be seen for miles in daylight gave way to the orange cast of flames above the treetops.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Ron Higman, Special to The Inquirer
Modena resident Donald Crothers has balked at an agreement to phase out his junkyard business. Now the Borough Council must decide what to do about all his old cars and discarded tires. Over the last few months, the council has been negotiating with Crothers to rid his property of accumulated junk in exchange for a one-year, no-cost junkyard permit. Crothers now operates his business in a residential area without a permit. "I'll agree to get rid of the junk that is there now, but I have to be able to continue to run my business," Crothers said.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
A two-year court battle between the Norwood Borough Council and a developer over the use of 2.5 acres of land has ended with a partial victory for both sides. At Monday's Norwood Borough Council meeting, acting solicitor Sam Auslander reported that on March 9, Commonwealth Court handed down a decision in the dispute with H & R Builders Inc., denying the developer's request to use the plot for a junkyard but allowing it to build 23 townhouses on the property near Mohawk and Winona Avenues.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
A conflict between neighbors made its way to a meeting of the Board of Supervisors in East Pikeland. At the meeting Tuesday night, Township Line Road resident Charles McDonald told the supervisors, "I had no idea I was moving next to a junkyard. " Residents of the Township Line Road and Mowere Road area are alarmed at what they describe as the mismanagement of a property owned by resident Frank Metz. Metz owns a 2-acre triangle-shaped tract at the junction of the two roads, and, according to neighbors, the property is a "trash disaster.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Hazzard, a lifelong resident of Lansdale, has had a longstanding problem with the Mattero Brothers junkyard. Sure, he said, he knows that everyone needs a place to dump trash. Sure, he knows that everyone's entitled to make a living and that that includes Mattero Brothers Co. But Hazzard has been hearing too much lately about environmental contamination, and it seems to him that with all the old junk that finds its final resting place at Matteros, some bad stuff has got to be seeping into the groundwater.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
What started as an argument over a flashlight ended last summer in the bloody death of an eccentric Woodland Township man who lived in a junkyard, according to a taped statement played in a Burlington County murder trial yesterday. Joseph C. Slover, 19, of Pemberton Township, is on trial in Superior Court in Burlington County on charges that he robbed and murdered a part-time watchman who lived in a converted school bus in the Southside Auto Wreckers & Salvage yard near Route 72. Slover, of Tennessee Trail, gave the tape-recorded statement to police the day after the Aug. 2 slaying of Martin M. Vinson, 53. Slover said he struck Vinson three times on the back of the head, leaving him bleeding and vomiting inside the school bus. But Slover said in the 70-minute statement that his friend, Larry Sego, was the one who did most of the beating.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | By Sandra McIntosh, Special to The Inquirer
The operator of a Deptford junkyard who was refused a license renewal by the township council in January because of noncompliance with local codes has brought his business into line with the ordinances, his attorney says. Michael A. Angelini, who represents John Barnes and his mother, Margaret, owners of Barnes Garage at 2007 County House Rd., filed suit two weeks ago in Superior Court in Woodbury against the council and Mayor Joseph Kivlen, Deputy Mayor Beatrice Cerkez and Councilmen Andrew Dilio and Joseph Burns, after the council refused to renew the business license or reschedule a hearing on the matter.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | By Jeremy Kalmanofsky, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer correspondent Mike Franolich contributed to this article
In the woods out back of 2344 West Route 70 - along Cherry Hill's corridor of multimillion-dollar office buildings and high-rise hotels - two septagenarian brothers lived in a corrugated metal shack with no running water and no heat. The Voschin brothers - Steven, 76, and Peter, 75 - had lived there for 14 years, Steven Voschin said, running their salvage yard and rebuffing developers who sought to buy their 11 acres of prime commercial real estate. They moved to the salvage yard in 1977 to protect it from thieves, "the damn vultures," Steven Voschin said, that preyed on them constantly.
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NEWS
April 2, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A CHAIN-LINK fence capped with razor wire sits between two pit bulls in a North Philly car lot and the lady who wants to pet them. The woman, who lives on Green Lane near Broad Street, tosses them some treats, and the dogs gobble them up quickly, their tails wiggling and wagging. "See how friendly they are? They wouldn't hurt a fly," said the woman, who didn't want to give her name. "You're just some nice doggies, aren't you?" Over the course of an hour on this Sunday afternoon, the dirt-covered dogs don't bark or growl at anyone, and the woman from Green Lane isn't the only one showering them with snacks and baby talk.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
AT LAST, someone has come up with a good idea about what to do with Philadelphia's scandal-ridden Traffic Court: Get rid of it. Sen. Dominic Pileggi, Republican leader of the state Senate, said he is working on legislation to abolish Traffic Court and shift its duties to Municipal Court. Pileggi said he was prompted to act because of an ongoing FBI investigation into corruption at the court and because of a report, done for the state Supreme Court by investigator William Chadwick, that revealed widespread fixing of cases based on politics.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Jules Edward Loh, 79, an Associated Press reporter for nearly 40 years who traveled the United States, reaching every state and using his honeyed Georgia accent to charm his way into the hearts, minds, and lives of Americans famous and obscure, died early Sunday. To write Lords of the Earth , a 1971 book about the Navajo Indians of Arizona, he became so close to tribal elders that they named him Poputiney, meaning "many pencils. " Despite numerous journalism awards by the time he retired in 1997, Mr. Loh said of himself: "I am a reporter, period.
NEWS
June 6, 2010
The Education of an Urban Farmer By Novella Carpenter Penguin, 277 pp. $16 paperback Reviewed by Bob Sheasley Novella Carpenter wells with tears to see her turkey mourning his mate, ripped by a rottweiler in the Oakland, Calif., ghetto she calls home. Harold circles what's left of Maude, puffs and preens as if asking her to mate, then thumps his head by her side. So much meat wasted. But she still had Harold for the Thanksgiving feast. That's how it is with Carpenter, who loves animals, in lots of ways.
NEWS
April 4, 2007 | James L. Martin
James L. Martin is president of the 60 Plus Association, a national nonpartisan senior citizen organization based in Arlington, Va. When it comes to protecting the environment, senior citizens should concentrate more on the total energy consumed in building and operating a car than its fuel efficiency - no matter how impressive the statistics appear on the window sticker at the showroom. A prime example is Toyota's Prius, a compact hybrid that's beloved by ardent environmentalists and that fetches premium prices because it gets nearly 50 miles-per-gallon in combined highway/city driving.
NEWS
March 23, 2007 | By JOHN GRANT
COMMER GLASS is a large, formidable African-American man. He's 62, and his eyesight is failing due to glaucoma. If you ran into him on the street, you'd think he was just another grandfather mellowed by time. But he's not on the street - he's in the 32nd year of a life sentence that, in Pennsylvania, means he'll be carried out in a box. It will cost around $50,000 a year to keep Glass in prison until that final day. Instead of wasting this taxpayer money, the state has the option to reform its historic antipathy to commutation and let Glass go. He has an excellent case to support that decision.
NEWS
August 31, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For almost a decade Steve Levetan has been trying to convince people that his do-it-yourself used auto-parts sites - what folks usually call junkyards - can be neighborly and environmentally friendly. Though Atlanta-based Pull-A-Part boasts of a "perfect environmental record nationwide" and surrounds its sites with eight-foot-high solid fence, trees and landscaping, Levetan is the first to admit it isn't always an easy sell. And Philadelphia, which Levetan would like as his first Pull-A-Part in the Northeastern United States, is reaffirming his experience.
LIVING
July 8, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A three-legged couch? Practically perfect! Magenta ball fringe? Simply fabulous! Broken sticks? Instantly inspiring! These humble items - and even ugly sidewalk leftovers - can be turned into things of beauty and awe, say Kathleen Hackett and Mary Ann Young, otherwise known as "The Salvage Sisters. " After decades of picking through salvage yards and picking up people's trash, these blond siblings have written their own how-to book, entitled The Salvage Sisters' Guide to Finding Style in the Street and Inspiration in the Attic (Artisan, $14.95)
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We '70s kids watched Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids all the time. I remember wearing patchwork jeans, a bumblebee T-shirt, and singing "Nah, nah, nah, gonna have a good time . . . Hey, hey, hey!" I was so small, not only didn't my feet touch the floor, they didn't even reach past the edge of the couch. Those were simpler times, you know, when carpet was a luxury and hardwood floors were standard. Wall-paneling wasn't considered retro. Sisters shared rooms outfitted with twin beds and Raggedy Ann dolls, not televisions and telephones.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2002 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
Mushmouth, Dumb Donald and Old Weird Harold will all be back. So will the junkyard. So will the daily life lessons that were always served up with the humor. Fat Albert, the famed cartoon character based on Bill Cosby's stand-up acts about his Philly childhood, starts his journey to the big screen next month, when shooting begins in Los Angeles with a live cast, major studio budget, and the support of the Cos himself. The movie version mixes animation with live action and won't be exactly the same as the long-running CBS TV series "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids," director Forest Whitaker told the Daily News.
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