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Jupiter

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NEWS
February 20, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MATTHEW ERICSON
The search for extraterrestrial life will start down a new path today. Galileo, which has been traveling around Jupiter for more than a year, will swoop close to the moon Europa. Scientists hope to collect detailed photos giving clues about whether the moon once supported life.
NEWS
August 7, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The NASA spacecraft Juno, en route to an unprecedented exploration of Jupiter and the origins of the solar system, lifted off Friday from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Juno launched aboard an Atlas 5 rocket at 12:25 p.m. into clear skies. The craft soared over the Atlantic then conducted two "burns" to set it on the right trajectory for a five-year, 1.7 billion-mile trip to Jupiter. "Today, with the launch of the Juno spacecraft, NASA began a journey to yet another new frontier," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The public is invited to view the planet Jupiter through telescopes tonight at two free programs, at Valley Forge National Historical Park and at Villanova University. One of the region's largest "star parties" will be held tonight beginning at 8 p.m. at the model-airplane field on Route 202 at the park. "More than a dozen telescopes will be set up," said Bob Summerfield, director of Astronomy to Go and one of the event's organizers. Amateur astronomers will also be on hand to discuss Jupiter and show slides and videos of comets and other astronomical bodies.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Dramatists through the ages, including Moliere, Shakespeare and a hundred lesser lights, have mined Greek mythology for raw material (many by cribbing from the adaptations by the Roman comic poet Plautus). So why should Harvard grad Barry Harman be an exception? Harman lifted "Amphitryon" from a 19th- century German named von Kleist, who had rewritten Moliere, who had copied Plautus. Then he persuaded one Grant Sturiale to dash off a score, and delivered himself a musical comedy peppy enough to register a modest off- Broadway hit trading as "Olympus on My Mind.
NEWS
December 31, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Jupiter will ring in the new year by looming directly overhead at midnight, as close to Earth as it will get all year. This coincidence of Earth's orbit and Jupiter's has not happened since 1752 and will not happen again until New Year's Eve 2084, said Jack Horkheimer, director of the Miami Space Transit Planetarium. Moreover, Jupiter will be cozying up to a bright and nearly full moon. When the sun sets tonight, Jupiter will rise in the northeast and will slowly climb in the sky until it reaches its highest point at midnight.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | Los Angeles Daily News
Astronomer Don Yeomans was at the supermarket last week when he came across a tabloid claiming that Saturday's collision between the planet Jupiter and a newly discovered comet will create a new ice age on Earth. Bemused, Yeomans - a senior scientist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory who has been tracking the comet for months - read that he and other scientists were covering up the truth about the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 to prevent public panic. "Well, there will be no ice age next week," Yeomans announced at a press briefing yesterday, drawing a laugh.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Earth may have a shy new neighbor. Astronomers announced late yesterday that they had accidentally found what appears to be a tiny new moon orbiting Jupiter. It would be the first new satellite of Jupiter discovered in 21 years. If confirmed, as scientists at the University of Arizona's Spacewatch program and Harvard University expect, it would be Jupiter's 17th moon. It was not easy to find. The unnamed moon, probably only three miles in diameter, is the smallest object orbiting any of the nine planets in our solar system, Harvard astronomer Brian Marsden said.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Old and retired, a bit rusty but still peppy and moving along despite the passing years. The description fits both vessel and crew of the tugboat Jupiter. The crew - a grizzled group of laid-back retirees, most in their 70s - amble aboard the 91-year-old tug singly and in pairs.. First, they rest their bones awhile in the galley over coffee and doughnuts. About 10 a.m. the old salts spread out and begin puttering around the tug. The engine kicks on; the tug moves 50 feet and stops.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Rivers Cuomo of Weezer emphatically expresses his patriotic fervor - with expletives! - on this new song inspired by NASA's Juno mission, which will enter Jupiter's orbit July Fourth, the day before Weezer plays the BB&T Pavilion in Camden.
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NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Rivers Cuomo of Weezer emphatically expresses his patriotic fervor - with expletives! - on this new song inspired by NASA's Juno mission, which will enter Jupiter's orbit July Fourth, the day before Weezer plays the BB&T Pavilion in Camden.
SPORTS
October 13, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
THE COMMUNITY park in Jupiter, Fla., serves as a sprawling sports complex, packed with soccer and baseball fields, basketball and tennis courts. The fields don't feature bright-yellow uprights, but you could still sometimes stumble upon a small group of young men there, kicking and punting footballs. To them, the park is most valuable for its abundance of towering light poles. An exercise in pinpoint accuracy and elevation, clanking a football off a pole, of course, poses a more formidable test than booting one between uprights stationed 18 1/2 feet apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Blood may be thicker than water, but it's still no match for the Mendelssohn Octet or a nice late Haydn quartet. You might have spent the better part of Wednesday night's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society mash-up of the Jasper and Jupiter quartets pondering family dynamics; there are, among and within the two groups, three siblings and two marriages, all stemming from the impossibly musical surname of Freivogel. Filial layers extended into the local premiere in the Perelman Theater of Dan Visconti's Eternal Breath . The 2011 work was commissioned to honor the 40th wedding anniversary of Bill and Margaret Freivogel, progenitors both musical and familial as parents or parents-in-law to five of the players.
NEWS
August 7, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The NASA spacecraft Juno, en route to an unprecedented exploration of Jupiter and the origins of the solar system, lifted off Friday from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Juno launched aboard an Atlas 5 rocket at 12:25 p.m. into clear skies. The craft soared over the Atlantic then conducted two "burns" to set it on the right trajectory for a five-year, 1.7 billion-mile trip to Jupiter. "Today, with the launch of the Juno spacecraft, NASA began a journey to yet another new frontier," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said.
NEWS
July 22, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All you would-be Galileos, take note. On Sunday, an Australian amateur used his homemade telescope to discover a new spot on Jupiter - a finding of cosmic importance. Using two of the world's largest telescopes, astronomers from NASA and the University of California Berkeley announced yesterday that the spot was real and probably got there when a giant piece of ice or rock slammed into the fifth planet from the sun. Scientists say telescopes around the world will be turning to Jupiter this week to watch the Earth-sized scar.
NEWS
March 1, 2004 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Mars is getting all the attention right now, but five other members of the solar system will be getting close-up examinations this year. Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan, Saturn's planet-size moon, are slated for visits by spaceships bristling with scientific instruments. Astronomers say these missions through the solar system can shed new light on the origin, development and fate of our own planet. "We use these planets as laboratories for understanding how things work here on Earth," said Torrence Johnson, a planetary scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
September 7, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Since departing for the heavens years ago, making an astro-widow of his wife, Donald McAlarnen has been listening for life on Jupiter. Not life as we know it, McAlarnen said one drizzly morning as he traced with his hand the width of the large radio telescope in his backyard. Life in the form of energy, massive energy, the kind of cataclysmic wallop produced when the electromagnetic fields of the solar system's largest planet collide with the molten sprays of sulfuric acid spewed into the atmosphere by its most intimate moon, Io. It is the sort of atomic love connection that McAlarnen has come to appreciate as an amateur astronomer and a cosmic eavesdropper whose day job is actually the night shift at Hewlett-Packard in King of Prussia.
NEWS
December 31, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Jupiter will ring in the new year by looming directly overhead at midnight, as close to Earth as it will get all year. This coincidence of Earth's orbit and Jupiter's has not happened since 1752 and will not happen again until New Year's Eve 2084, said Jack Horkheimer, director of the Miami Space Transit Planetarium. Moreover, Jupiter will be cozying up to a bright and nearly full moon. When the sun sets tonight, Jupiter will rise in the northeast and will slowly climb in the sky until it reaches its highest point at midnight.
SPORTS
March 15, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Tony La Russa's office has become a celebrity lounge, just as Tommy Lasorda's used to be in Los Angeles. The manager's tiny office in the St. Louis Cardinals' spring-training headquarters, Richard Dean Stadium in Jupiter, Fla., is a name-dropper's paradise. On Monday, Bill Parcells was on the pass list. So were Jim Palmer and pop singer Richard Marx. Former Indiana coach Bob Knight stopped by over the weekend. The guy wearing a Cardinals cap next to La Russa during a "B" game last week was Mike Schmidt.
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