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Jury Selection

NEWS
February 19, 1988 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
The jury-selection process began yesterday in the murder trial of reputed mobster Nicodemo Scarfo and eight associates in connection with the 1984 killing of Salvatore Testa. Common Pleas Court Judge Albert F. Sabo questioned, en masse, a panel of 36 prospective jurors to give attorneys in the case an idea of what biases the panelists might hold. No jurors were actually chosen. Before more than a handful of the jurors had been questioned individually, Assistant District Attorney Barbara Christie requested a back-room consultation with the judge and the defense attorneys to discuss problems with the selection process.
NEWS
October 8, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid heightened security - including two rows of large, water-filled orange barriers in front of the federal courthouse and the presence of a parked Camden City police car with its emergency lights flashing - jury selection moved forward yesterday in the Fort Dix terrorism trial. Additional security measures included an electronic monitor designed to sense explosives and a metal detector, both at the fourth-floor entrance to the courtroom where the trial will be held. The precautions were not lost on one of the potential jurors, who said security concerns had given her pause about serving on the panel.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection in the Sean Daily murder trial has been going on for a week now, and at times has been more grueling for those dismissed than for those chosen. A young woman left the courtroom in tears one day last week after she was compelled to reveal she had once attempted suicide. The same day, a man who had acknowledged seeking psychological counseling said that he did so after his young son was killed last year in a traffic accident. Both he and the woman were dismissed by agreement of the prosecutor and the defense attorneys.
SPORTS
May 13, 1986 | By Craig Stock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection began yesterday in the $1.32 billion antitrust lawsuit filed against the National Football League by the rival United States Football League. Potential jurors in U.S. District Court were questioned about their educational and work backgrounds and about their knowledge of football, other sports, television and antitrust law. The USFL lawsuit accuses the NFL of violating federal antitrust law by "tying up" all three major television networks with contracts to carry NFL games.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Let's talk about Mark Fuhrman," attorney Anderson D. Harkov said, looking across the courtroom at the man in the jury box. But this courtroom was not in Los Angeles, it was in the Burlington County Courthouse in Mount Holly. The O.J. Simpson trial, which invaded the nation's psyche, is now invading a local courtroom, as lawyers try to pick a jury for the capital murder trial of James Clausell. Clausell, 32, is accused of the 1984 killing of a Willingboro man. After weeks of delays, the trial resumed yesterday as lawyers began questioning potential jurors in the case.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The shouts of those who would re-elect Mayor Marion Barry and those who would boot him from office bounced off the front of the U.S. courthouse here yesterday, while inside, the difficult process of selecting an impartial jury to hear the drug and perjury case against the mayor began. Trying to keep the trial as free as possible from the high emotions the case has generated, a pool of 250 potential jurors was asked to answer a 25- page survey containing 69 questions. The questionnaire sought opinions on everything from the use of undercover sting operations, which the government used in January to catch Barry smoking crack, to whether a defendant's request for "divine forgiveness" would affect a finding of guilt or innocence.
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