CollectionsJury Trial
IN THE NEWS

Jury Trial

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Broadening a controversial decision he made earlier this year, a Burlington County judge ruled this week that an accused drunken driver has a right to a jury trial even if the driver is only a first offender. Superior Court Judge Martin L. Haines wrote in an opinion released yesterday that the penalties drunken drivers face are serious enough to require a jury trial, even if these trials are more time-consuming and expensive than the nonjury municipal court trials that take place now. Haines had earlier ruled that only second offenders had a right to juries.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 17-year-old Chester boy accused of participating in the August shooting death of a former Chester High School cheerleader is scheduled to go on trial in Delaware County Court this week on a charge of first-degree murder. Five teenagers were acquitted of first-degree murder but were found guilty Nov. 3 of aggravated assault in a nonjury trial stemming from a gang shootout in which Carla Carrington, 17, of Chester, was killed by a stray bullet. Common Pleas Court Judge Domenic Jerome found a sixth youth not guilty of any charges.
NEWS
November 17, 2015
ISSUE | CONSUMER AFFAIRS The right to jury trial Inquirer business columnist Chris Mondics suggests that lawyer Alan Kaplinsky is responsible for the "mostly successful counterattack by American business against plaintiffs' class actions" ("Pioneer in the class-action tug of war," Wednesday). This "counterattack" has launched a hidden and insidious weapon that is responsible for successfully depriving consumers of their constitutional right to a jury trial. And the biggest beneficiaries of this counterattack?
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
When former Montgomery County Republican Chairman Robert J. Kerns goes to trial next week on sex charges, he will have to convince only one person of his innocence. John L. Braxton, a Philadelphia senior judge, was assigned to the case after the Montgomery County bench was recused to avoid any potential bias for or against the onetime political heavyweight. Court documents show that Kerns, 67, has opted not to take his case before a jury, a strategy one criminal defense expert said could be risky.
SPORTS
January 30, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
The Minnesota Twins agreed to contract terms yesterday with veteran lefthanded pitcher Steve Carlton, who had become a free agent after not receiving a contract offer from the Twins at the end of the 1987 season. Terms of the one-year pact were not disclosed. Minnesota acquired Carlton, 43, at the beginning of August from the Cleveland Indians. He was 5-9 with the Indians in 1987 but went 1-5 with the Twins and was not on Minnesota's playoff roster. He had a combined 5.74 earned run average with the two teams last season.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The rights of the criminally accused in Pennsylvania are at issue with two ballot questions that voters will decide Tuesday. Both questions are proposed amendments to the state constitution. As required, they have passed two consecutive sessions of the General Assembly. The first change to the state constitution would allow for the denial of bail if a defendant is charged with an offense punishable by life imprisonment or if the safety of any person or the community cannot be reasonably assured.
NEWS
May 22, 1998
For now, the judge is still the person for whom all stand in a Pennsylvania courtroom. But imagine a different start to a trial: Order in the court. All rise, for the honorable . . . district attorney. Sound far-fetched? Well, if a proposed amendment to the state constitution goes ahead giving prosecutors the right to demand a jury trial, court criers might as well herald the prosecutor's arrival. Judges - not to mention defendants - may be asked to knock before entering the room.
NEWS
February 7, 1997
When the Philadelphia courts make headlines, the folks in black robes often light up the office switchboard, calling one another to discuss the news. But following a Sunday Inquirer report about the breaks judges sometimes give people convicted in robbery, assault and drug cases, the phones didn't jump off the hook. Judges know well this is the way the system works. The shock, maybe, comes for the rest of us, lulled by all the tough-on-crime talk by elected officials.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who presided over the landmark 2012 Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial has been assigned to handle what is expected to be the biggest civil trial in years - the Sept. 6 trial of lawsuits from the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse. Court records show Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina was assigned Thursday to preside over what is expected to be a four-week jury trial of suits against real estate speculator Richard Basciano, several of his companies, the Salvation Army, and others on behalf of six people killed and 13 injured June 5, 2013.
NEWS
December 19, 2015
IRAQ 'Friendly fire' attack reported An air strike by U.S.-led coalition planes hit Iraqi army forces, the Iraqi military said on Friday, the first time it has reported a friendly fire incident since American jets began bombing Islamic State militants in the country last year. In a statement, the Iraqi Defense Ministry said one Iraqi officer was killed and nine were injured in the incident near Amariyat al-Fallujah, west of Baghdad. Brig. Gen. Yayha Rasoul, a spokesman for the Iraqi military, confirmed the statement.
NEWS
November 17, 2015
ISSUE | CONSUMER AFFAIRS The right to jury trial Inquirer business columnist Chris Mondics suggests that lawyer Alan Kaplinsky is responsible for the "mostly successful counterattack by American business against plaintiffs' class actions" ("Pioneer in the class-action tug of war," Wednesday). This "counterattack" has launched a hidden and insidious weapon that is responsible for successfully depriving consumers of their constitutional right to a jury trial. And the biggest beneficiaries of this counterattack?
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A LOBBYIST from a prominent Republican family, who is married to 6abc reporter Annie McCormick, pleaded no contest yesterday to misdemeanor charges in a groping incident involving a 27-year-old woman last year. Andrew Marsico, 41, of Center City, was then sentenced to five years' probation under a plea deal negotiated by his attorney, Fortunato "Fred" Perri Jr., and Assistant District Attorney Adam Geer. In telling Common Pleas Judge Charles Cunningham III about the facts in the case, Geer said that about 10 p.m. Aug. 21, 2014, Marsico and the woman were alone in his office, at Greenlee Partners, in The Bellevue, at Broad and Walnut streets.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Center City Republican lobbyist pleaded no contest Friday to groping a woman he invited to his office after an evening event at the Union League. Andrew J. Marsico, 41, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor counts of simple assault, reckless endangerment, and harassment in the Aug. 21, 2014, incident in his Greenlee Partners office in the Hyatt at the Bellevue. At a preliminary hearing last November, the woman testified that she met Marsico at the event. After going to his office, she said, about 10 p.m. he pushed her against a wall and groped her. For Marsico, the no-contest plea was a major break.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A 24-YEAR-OLD man accused of killing a mother and three of her kids while allegedly racing another driver on Roosevelt Boulevard two years ago opted yesterday to forgo a jury trial and have a judge hear the case instead. In exchange for passing on a jury trial, Khusen Akhmedov, if convicted of multiple counts of third-degree murder, would not face a mandatory sentence of life in prison without parole. Defense attorney Michael Diamondstein, in his opening statement before Common Pleas Judge Steven Geroff, admitted that Akhmedov's 2012 silver Audi S4 was the car that smashed into Samara Banks, 27, and three of her young sons as they crossed Roosevelt Boulevard about 10:30 p.m. July 16, 2013.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A 32-year-old man who was reportedly racing another driver on Roosevelt Boulevard two years ago when the other driver allegedly hit and killed a mother and three of her kids who were crossing the Boulevard pleaded guilty in court Monday. Ahmen Holloman pleaded guilty to four counts of vehicular homicide instead of facing a jury trial. As part of a deal negotiated by his attorney, Lonny Fish, and Assistant District Attorney Thomas Lipscomb, Holloman was then sentenced to five to 10 years in state prison by Common Pleas Judge Steven Geroff.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Any police officer who has had to bite his tongue as he watched a suspect walk free after a jury trial would likely agree with the statement that a not-guilty verdict isn't the same as innocence. Remember that in considering last week's acquittal of six former members of an elite Philadelphia police narcotics unit accused of corruption. While a federal jury did not convict the accused, more than 80 pending lawsuits addressing their behavior suggest this story isn't over. A lawyer for one of the defendants had the audacity to say Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey owes an apology to the former officers he fired.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
CRYING AND emotional, Daniela Gonzalez yesterday told a judge that the last image she had of her 3-year-old son was of him in his coffin with his teddy bear. "This [murder] has completely torn my heart, and it's been ripped out and thrown into a 5-foot box," she said. Gonzalez, 25, was speaking at the sentencing hearing of her former boyfriend, Joseph Zysk, with whom she had a four-month relationship. On Monday, Zysk, 31, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the 2011 beating death of Gonzalez's son, Jason Larkin Jr., instead of facing a retrial.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|