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Jury Trial

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NEWS
October 13, 2006 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man accused of strangling La'Toyia Figueroa, the 24-year-old pregnant West Philadelphia woman whose disappearance became a cause celebre, waived his right to a jury trial yesterday. With that, testimony began in the trial of Stephen Poaches, 27, of West Philadelphia, who faces two counts of murder and related offenses in the July 18, 2005, deaths of Figueroa and her unborn child. Poaches was the father of the child and Figueroa's former boyfriend. Michael Coard, Poaches' lawyer, said in a telephone interview yesterday that he and his client always wanted a trial by judge alone, not jury, because of the "legal niceties" involved in the case that a judge would probably better understand.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Broadening a controversial decision he made earlier this year, a Burlington County judge ruled this week that an accused drunken driver has a right to a jury trial even if the driver is only a first offender. Superior Court Judge Martin L. Haines wrote in an opinion released yesterday that the penalties drunken drivers face are serious enough to require a jury trial, even if these trials are more time-consuming and expensive than the nonjury municipal court trials that take place now. Haines had earlier ruled that only second offenders had a right to juries.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 17-year-old Chester boy accused of participating in the August shooting death of a former Chester High School cheerleader is scheduled to go on trial in Delaware County Court this week on a charge of first-degree murder. Five teenagers were acquitted of first-degree murder but were found guilty Nov. 3 of aggravated assault in a nonjury trial stemming from a gang shootout in which Carla Carrington, 17, of Chester, was killed by a stray bullet. Common Pleas Court Judge Domenic Jerome found a sixth youth not guilty of any charges.
SPORTS
January 30, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
The Minnesota Twins agreed to contract terms yesterday with veteran lefthanded pitcher Steve Carlton, who had become a free agent after not receiving a contract offer from the Twins at the end of the 1987 season. Terms of the one-year pact were not disclosed. Minnesota acquired Carlton, 43, at the beginning of August from the Cleveland Indians. He was 5-9 with the Indians in 1987 but went 1-5 with the Twins and was not on Minnesota's playoff roster. He had a combined 5.74 earned run average with the two teams last season.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The rights of the criminally accused in Pennsylvania are at issue with two ballot questions that voters will decide Tuesday. Both questions are proposed amendments to the state constitution. As required, they have passed two consecutive sessions of the General Assembly. The first change to the state constitution would allow for the denial of bail if a defendant is charged with an offense punishable by life imprisonment or if the safety of any person or the community cannot be reasonably assured.
NEWS
May 22, 1998
For now, the judge is still the person for whom all stand in a Pennsylvania courtroom. But imagine a different start to a trial: Order in the court. All rise, for the honorable . . . district attorney. Sound far-fetched? Well, if a proposed amendment to the state constitution goes ahead giving prosecutors the right to demand a jury trial, court criers might as well herald the prosecutor's arrival. Judges - not to mention defendants - may be asked to knock before entering the room.
NEWS
February 7, 1997
When the Philadelphia courts make headlines, the folks in black robes often light up the office switchboard, calling one another to discuss the news. But following a Sunday Inquirer report about the breaks judges sometimes give people convicted in robbery, assault and drug cases, the phones didn't jump off the hook. Judges know well this is the way the system works. The shock, maybe, comes for the rest of us, lulled by all the tough-on-crime talk by elected officials.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lawyer for Charles Bagley, charged with murder in the 1989 death of his wife in a whirlpool bath, said yesterday that he might ask for a non-jury trial when the case goes to trial April 12. Neil Jokelson said yesterday during a pretrial hearing in Delaware County Court that it appeared likely that Bagley would waive his right to a jury trial. Judge Joseph P. Cronin said he would advise Bagley whether he felt such a decision was wise. In the hearing that began yesterday and is expected to continue today, Jokelson contended that the prosecution had not provided the defense with a theory as to how the alleged crime was committed.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Milton Street, the flamboyant ex-Traffic Court official, was sentenced yesterday to four weekends in jail, fined $3,000 and ordered to perform 480 hours of community service for assaulting a Traffic Court employee in May 1991. On April 3, Street, a former state senator, was convicted by a Common Pleas Court jury of simple assault and disorderly conduct stemming from an incident on May 1, 1991, when Street burst into the courtroom of George Twardy, then Traffic Court's president judge, shoved aside one court officer and punched another in the mouth.
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BUSINESS
June 29, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury said Honda should pay $55.3 million to a York, Pa., resident who was badly injured in 2010 when his Acura Integra rolled over during a crash while he was en route to work in Maryland. American Honda Motor Co. said it would appeal Thursday's decision. A native of the Dominican Republic, Carlos Martinez, 57, was working as a glazier for a construction company at the time of the accident, but now must use a wheelchair, according to his attorney, Stewart Eisenberg.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
A MAN DIES in the street and another man is charged. A jury is impaneled and for three days listens to the prosecution's version of events. Before presenting his case, the defense attorney appeals to the judge for an acquittal and she takes the uncommon step of dismissing the case. The victim was an off-duty cop. The accused worked for Wells Fargo. They had a history - the accused was involved with the dead man's ex-girlfriend. The prosecution's case was this: In 2012, there was a late-night collision between a car driven by Kareem Alleyne and a bicycle ridden by Marc Brady, 35, an off-duty cop. Brady died from injuries and Alleyne was charged with vehicular homicide and involuntary manslaughter.
SPORTS
June 19, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Drexel sports-management professor Ellen Staurowsky couldn't have been surprised she'd get some pushback from NCAA attorneys when she testified Monday and Tuesday at the landmark Ed O'Bannon class-action antitrust trial. The main area she was asked to address by the plaintiffs' attorneys, she said, is whether the business practices associated with FBS football and men's basketball are consistent with the NCAA's claims about amateurism. Since Staurowsky is coauthor of a book titled College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA Amateur's Myth , you can guess where she stands on the issue.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just because they call it a "gag order" doesn't mean you're allowed to write. That's the message a Philadelphia judge delivered Tuesday to Padge Victoria Windslowe - the hip-hop performer "Black Madam" awaiting trial in the death of a woman allegedly injected with illegal cosmetic silicone - after she sent plaintive letters to the Philadelphia Daily News. Common Pleas Court Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi warned Windslowe she could have been held in contempt of court for violating the gag order.
NEWS
June 1, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A homeless man convicted of stabbing and killing another homeless man in Center City's LOVE Park after an argument was sentenced to eight to 25 years in prison Friday. Frederick Mills, 47, apologized for killing Allen Jordan, 43, after a late-night confrontation in August 2011. During a jury trial in February before Common Pleas Court Judge Linda Carpenter, Mills testified that he got into the argument with Jordan after he was roughed up and robbed of jewelry. "He has no prior record and he's 47 years old," defense attorney Jay S. Gottlieb said of Mills.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A SOUTHWEST Philadelphia woman who in 2012 hired a neighborhood mechanic to murder her live-in boyfriend apparently looked reality in the face yesterday morning and called off her jury trial in Common Pleas Court. Instead of picking a jury, Desiree Arnett Hicks, 58, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for her role in the calculated May 31, 2012, slaying of Aaron Hayes, 52. Hayes, a SEPTA trolley operator, was gunned down just before 5 a.m. in front of the couple's Elmwood Avenue home as he opened the back door of his van to place work tools inside.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maintaining his innocence - but wanting to avoid a possible death sentence - a Florida man allegedly linked by DNA to the 1996 rape and murder of a Kensington teen has agreed to a nonjury trial. Rafael Crespo appeared before Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart on Thursday and waived his right to a trial by jury in the slaying of 17-year-old Anjeanette Maldonado. Minehart set Sept. 8 for a three-day bench trial, though he heard brief testimony from the girl's mother, Paulette Smith.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THE so-called Swiss Cheese Pervert is receiving "inpatient treatment," a judge was told yesterday. Just what type of treatment Christopher Pagano is undergoing was not revealed in court by his lawyer, Richard Quinton Hark, who also declined to specify it during an interview. Pagano, the Norristown man arrested in January for flashing his cheese-accessorized penis, was not in court to hear that his preliminary hearing was scheduled for April 10. The District Attorney's Office also informed Municipal Judge Wendy L. Pew that it will try Pagano by a jury rather than by judge, which it has a legal right to do despite the charges being misdemeanors.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
DARBY BOROUGH After 23 years in the United States, business owner and ordained pastor Fayiah Lebie was looking forward to becoming a U.S. citizen on June 14, 2012. Instead, he spent the day in a jail cell. Now acquitted of the charges against him, Lebie filed suit against Darby Borough on Friday, contending that he was unjustly arrested and punched, and had a Taser used on him, simply because he took a photograph with his cellphone of a friend's vehicle that was about to be towed. According to his lawsuit, Lebie was attending a board meeting in the Delaware County borough of an organization that helps natives of his homeland, Liberia.
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