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SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press
Don King expects to be indicted on insurance and tax-fraud charges within the next two weeks, associates of the boxing promoter said last night. King could not be reached for comment, but a spokesman said that the promoter acknowledged that the Justice Department was investigating his financial dealings. "Don feels he will be indicted, but his feeling is, 'Either do it or don't do it - just get it over with,' " said Michael Marley, a spokesman for the promoter. "He wants to get it over with, because it's his contention that he's done nothing illegal.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Philip Rucker and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Current and former Justice Department officials said Monday that bringing civil rights charges against George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black 17-year-old in Florida, would be extremely difficult and may not be possible. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. vowed to continue a federal investigation of the matter, but other officials said in interviews that the government may not be able to charge Zimmerman with a federal hate crime because it's not clear that he killed Martin because of his race.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | By Melanie Eversley, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Justice Department, responding to pressure from the family of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., agreed yesterday to investigate new evidence in the 1968 assassination of the civil rights leader. The investigation, announced by Attorney General Janet Reno, could help settle some of the questions about a possible conspiracy that have existed since Dr. King was shot to death on a Memphis, Tenn., motel balcony. The civil rights community has long had suspicions about the assassination and has suggested there was a conspiracy involving law enforcement and organized crime.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | by Charles E. Grassley, From the New York Times
One of America's largest medical companies, National Health Laboratories, agreed last month to pay the government $110 million to settle a lawsuit for unnecessary medical tests billed to Medicaid and Medicare. In July, General Electric agreed to pay a $59.5 million civil settlement stemming from a conspiracy between GE executives and an Israeli general to charge the United States for goods and services that were never provided. In June, the successor to the Singer Corp., the CAE-Link Corp.
NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Jacques Billeaud, Associated Press
PHOENIX - The U.S. Justice Department sued America's self-proclaimed toughest sheriff Thursday, a rare step for the agency after months of negotiations failed to reach a settlement over allegations that his department racially profiled Latinos in his immigration patrols. Federal officials said that only once before had the agency filed a lawsuit against a police department that they were unable to reach an agreement with in the 18-year history of the DOJ's police reform efforts.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The federal government has taken over the investigation of misconduct allegations against investigators and prosecutors involved in a probe of city prison corruption. Following a meeting with Police Commissioner Willie Williams, District Attorney Ronald D. Castille and FBI officials, representatives of the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department yesterday agreed to review the handling of the cases and treatment of witnesses. Today, FBI agents were expected to begin reviewing the evidence to determine if civil rights had been violated.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
If there is a small regret in Glenn Fine's sporting life, it's this: Fine didn't show up in Texas for rookie camp in 1979 after the San Antonio Spurs drafted him in the 10th round, the 199th player taken of 202 overall. Fine had other plans. He had been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship out of Harvard and knew that he was done with hoops - and that if he had gone to that Spurs camp, he would have been cut, probably quickly. These days, the draft is two rounds, and second-rounders don't necessarily make it. A 10-round draft?
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Justice Department officials, in a rare move, yesterday challenged part of independent prosecutor Lawrence Walsh's conspiracy charges against retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L. North in the Iran-contra arms sale case. In its memo, the Justice Department echoed North's view that he has done nothing criminal but instead has been caught in a political conflict between the President and Congress over foreign policy powers. The department said, "Policy disagreements between the executive and legislative branches are contemplated by the Constitution and cannot be criminal in nature.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal attorneys did not act unprofessionally by dropping voting-rights charges against two of three New Black Panther Party members allegedly involved in voter intimidation at a Fairmount Avenue polling place in 2008, a Justice Department internal review has concluded. The case has received wide attention from Republicans unhappy with the way the Obama administration has handled it. The alleged harassment at 12th Street and Fairmount received virtually no attention in Philadelphia when it occurred Nov. 4, 2008, the day of President Obama's election.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
In a setback to the food and cosmetic industries, the government will not appeal to the Supreme Court a ruling that food and cosmetics with traces of carcinogens must be kept off the market, federal officials said yesterday. Ruling in a case involving food and cosmetic dyes known to cause cancer in animals, the Food and Drug Administration refused last year to ban the dyes, arguing that the cancer risk was so small as to be legally insignificant. But a federal appeals court threw out the FDA ruling in October, concluding that a 1958 law known as the Delaney Clause, after its principal author, required the agency to ban any food additive known to cause cancer in humans or animals.
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NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE MOTHER of a man killed by police during a December car stop in Frankford filed a class-action lawsuit today on behalf of all citizens abused by Philadelphia police. The lawsuit, filed by Tanya Brown-Dickerson, mother of Brandon Tate-Brown, asks a judge to order the reforms recommended in a recent federal Justice Department report and appoint an administrator to ensure compliance. The Justice Department report, released last month, found that police had shot, on average, 49 people a year since 2007.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a meeting with Justice Department officials Wednesday, Comcast Corp. attorneys met with the Federal Communications Commission to discuss the company's proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. The Wall Street Journal reported late Wednesday that the FCC might seek a hearing before an administrative law judge over the Comcast-Time Warner deal's public benefits, which would be a setback to the transaction. Comcast would neither confirm nor deny the report.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Friday named a diverse group of 24 people to oversee the implementation of the 91 recommendations made last month in a U.S. Department of Justice report that found that Philadelphia police used lethal force too often. The newly created Police Community Oversight Board will also work on implementing the broader recommendations made in President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing report, which made similar suggestions. Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey chaired the task force.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Comcast critics cautiously cheered Friday after a report that federal antitrust lawyers may soon recommend blocking the Philadelphia company's proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. Justice Department staffers are nearing a recommendation to oppose the $45 billion deal that would combine the nation's largest and second-largest cable and Internet companies, Bloomberg News reported, citing unnamed sources familiar with the antitrust review. But a Comcast spokeswoman said "there is no basis for a lawsuit to block the transaction," which the company says will not reduce competition.
NEWS
April 16, 2015
ISSUE | SEN. MENENDEZ Friendship matters In its rush to judgment about the indictment of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.), The Inquirer took mocking aim at one of the key legal issues and missed the mark ("Friendship and corruption," April 3). Despite the editors' skepticism, the difference between friendship and corruption will make all the difference. The senator says that he and Dr. Salomon Melgen have had a 20-year friendship, attending family events, vacationing, and doing what good friends do. The Justice Department's Public Integrity Section has charged Melgen with bribing the senator.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
IN A CITY FAMOUS for police brutality and corruption, where officers shoot about 49 people a year, the Philadelphia Police Department has a long way to go to reduce its use of deadly force and rebuild the community's broken trust, according to a federal Justice Department report issued yesterday. The department's office of Community Oriented Policing Services, or COPS, spent a year assessing Philly's use of force, identifying 48 issues and making 91 recommendations for reform. Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey asked for the review in 2013 after a Philly.com report found police-involved shootings skyrocketing here, even as violent crimes and assaults against police dropped.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Officials of the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday they were postponing the release of their review of the use of deadly force by Philadelphia police. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's office said the review would be released at a later date. No reason was given for the delay. The postponement comes as police investigate the shooting death on Thursday of Philadelphia Police Officer Robert Wilson III during a holdup at a video game store in the Swampoodle section of the city.
NEWS
February 26, 2015
ISSUE | CITY HALL BUG J'accuse, Sam Katz Michael Smerconish's column on Sunday contained an extraordinary accusation by former mayoral candidate Sam Katz that I knew I was lying when I criticized the Justice Department for playing politics regarding the bug placed in the office of then-Mayor John F. Street ("No regrets on Street tactice," Feb. 22). Well, Katz is wrong, and here is why: Shortly after the bug was discovered, the spokeswoman for the Justice Department in Philadelphia stated on the record that the department would have no comment whatsoever about who placed the bug. Except, she added, it wasn't the Katz campaign.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1984, Diane DeBarri, a Bucks County native, was convicted of federal drug charges and sentenced to 90 days in prison. Since then, she has more than turned her life around, rising to be chief executive officer and chairman of the Kintock Group, a nonprofit that runs halfway houses and counseling programs in Philadelphia and New Jersey and employs 300 people. But she was haunted by the conviction. "I think I wanted some closure in my life," said DeBarri, 61, of Fairless Hills.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | BY MICHAEL RESNICK
REGARDING the Dec. 5 editorial that touched on the stop-and-frisk policy in Philadelphia, there were several points that require clarification. First, stop-and-frisk policies, like the one used in Philadelphia, were upheld in 1968 by the U.S. Supreme Court, in Terry v. Ohio. Not only was the practice ruled constitutional, but the provisions of Terry have been further expanded in subsequent years. Second, the editorial mentions the 2011 case that the ACLU brought against the city, Bailey v. City of Philadelphia.
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