FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A PHILADELPHIA substitute teacher was awarded back pay and interest after filing a complaint that he was discriminated against because he is from Kenya, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission said yesterday. The commission ordered K-12 Staffing of Philadelphia to pay Paul Musumba $1,573. Musumba alleged that the company failed to pay him for 17 of the 27 days he worked as a substitute teacher for the vendor in September and October 2011, the commission said in a news release.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
FRIDAY IS the deadline for district students to exercise their educational options: apply to a citywide high school; apply to a special admission high school; or transfer to a district neighborhood school. Students and parents can explore their choices at greatphillyschools.org, which has compiled ratings for more than 400 K-12 schools in the city. The site, run by the Philadelphia School Partnership and several nonprofit partners including the Urban Affairs Coalition, offers ratings and information on district, charter, Catholic and private schools.
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A businessman with a track record of aiding Catholic schools is launching a nonprofit aimed at raising at least $100 million in private funds to support all quality schools in Philadelphia, whether public, charter, Catholic, or private. Michael O'Neill, who has also helped charters, said his newest project would support success. "My goal is better education for kids," he said. "A seat that's producing a graduate is a successful seat," O'Neill said. "One which is not producing a graduate is not. " The initiative, the Philadelphia Schools Project, and its broad outlines were introduced to educators and philanthropists in June.
NEWS
January 16, 2016
By Jacob Vigdor and Josh McGee The school wars never seem to end in Philadelphia. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr.'s recently announced intention to close several schools and convert them into charters has met opposition. One might be tempted to conclude that providing outstanding public education is impossible in this climate, but there are beacons of excellence. According to a new school rating system we've developed - found at SchoolGrades.org - half the elementary and middle schools in Philadelphia receive an F grade, putting them on par with the average performance of schools in countries at the bottom of international education rankings, like Serbia and Thailand, and well below the national average.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students and parents in the Tredyffrin/Easttown School District will find numerous changes in the district next year. Renovations and additions to the district's five elementary buildings are scheduled to begin in June, the fifth grade is moving to the middle school in September, and there will be administrative changes at the elementary, middle and high schools in January. Dan Waters, who has been principal at Conestoga High School since July 1988, will become the director of educational programs in July 1995, a redefined position currently held by Barry Yocom, the director of curriculum and instruction.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For months, residents have been awaiting word on whether Winslow Township will be able to establish its own K-12 school district. Now they will also have to wait to find out who will be leading their elementary schools. Barry Galasso, the district's school superintendent, has accepted a post as superintendent of the Eastern Camden County Regional School District. Galasso said yesterday that he would begin his new job Oct. 1. "This presents another challenge in my career," he said.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Planned Parenthood is taking a hand in this year's school board elections across Chester County in what it says is an attempt to smoke out Christian fundamentalist candidates who have a hidden agenda. The group has sent questionnaires to school board candidates running in the May 18 primary to find out how they feel about issues involving sex education and how schools should deal with student sexuality. But several candidates have a problem with Planned Parenthood's agenda.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When seven towns in southern Camden County formed a regional school district in 1939, their union made sense both educationally and financially. There was no way the small, rural communities could support their own football teams and high school cafeterias. But times have changed. As the farmlands and cranberry bogs of Waterford and Winslow have given way to cul-de-sacs and two-car garages, the populations of those townships have tripled and then tripled again. Now, the Lower Camden County Regional School District is packed to the gills, with 1,000 more students than its four schools should hold.
NEWS
July 22, 2002
CONGRATULATIONS on your editorial welcoming Paul Vallas as superintendent of schools (July 11). I know Mr. Vallas from when he was chief executive for the Chicago public schools, and I played a similar role in Detroit. Mr. Vallas is plainly the most effective and successful big city public school leader in America,and we are fortunate that he is coming here. I hope, however, that Mr. Vallas won't follow your advice to ignore Mayor Street. No big-city school chief can succeed without the support of the mayor.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nobel Learning Communities Inc., a school operator based in Media, announced record third-quarter earnings yesterday and said that enrollments for its summer and fall sessions were going well. The for-profit educational company said the period ending March 31 marked the seventh consecutive quarter in which earnings increased over the same period in the previous year. Revenues for the quarter were up by 14 percent, and per-share earnings increased to 13 cents from 10 cents.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Donald A. Borden, a longtime Camden County schoolteacher and administrator, will inherit a campus in motion when he becomes Camden County College's president this summer. Like other community colleges, the school has resorted to layoffs and budget crunches to respond to enrollment and revenue declines. The college has about 100 fewer jobs than two years ago, including six people laid off just a few weeks ago at Borden's recommendation. "I've seen it in so many places, when you're cutting and you're cutting, and the money's going down, and your student body's going down - you just fall into this malaise," Borden said.
NEWS
January 16, 2016
By Jacob Vigdor and Josh McGee The school wars never seem to end in Philadelphia. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr.'s recently announced intention to close several schools and convert them into charters has met opposition. One might be tempted to conclude that providing outstanding public education is impossible in this climate, but there are beacons of excellence. According to a new school rating system we've developed - found at SchoolGrades.org - half the elementary and middle schools in Philadelphia receive an F grade, putting them on par with the average performance of schools in countries at the bottom of international education rankings, like Serbia and Thailand, and well below the national average.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A hearing on an emergency request by Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School for $1.4 million from the Philadelphia School District was postponed by a Common Pleas Court judge until Friday. The school, which had warned it might close as soon as Friday without the money, will continue to operate normally. "We're opening the school tomorrow," said Palmer, who founded the school that bears his name. "But each day is critical time," he said after the proceeding was delayed.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A PHILADELPHIA substitute teacher was awarded back pay and interest after filing a complaint that he was discriminated against because he is from Kenya, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission said yesterday. The commission ordered K-12 Staffing of Philadelphia to pay Paul Musumba $1,573. Musumba alleged that the company failed to pay him for 17 of the 27 days he worked as a substitute teacher for the vendor in September and October 2011, the commission said in a news release.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A different type of match was made this week in the Philadelphia region's Jewish education community - and the product of the union will be named the Robert M. Saligman Middle School of the Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy. On Tuesday night, the boards of the Perelman Jewish Day School and Barrack Hebrew Academy met separately and approved merging their programs for grades six through eight. After this school year ends, Perelman's Saligman Middle School will move from its Melrose Park location at the Mandell Education Campus on Old York Road to a building that will become the new middle school on Barrack's 35-acre campus in Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert F. Johnson, 66, of Pitman, a lifelong educator who served as superintendent of the Lindenwold public schools from 1994 to 2000, died Tuesday, Dec. 11, of a heart ailment while swimming in the Gloucester County Institute of Technology pool, his morning ritual for 20 years. When Mr. Johnson assumed the helm of the small school system, consisting then of three elementaries, he was handed the state-mandated task of reassigning students to achieve racial balance. "Many parents weren't real pleased with him over that," said his wife, Sally.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
By Rhonda Brownstein The Pennsylvania Department of Education is considering eight new cyber charter school applications, including four that would target Philadelphia-area students. It should not approve a single one. The academic performance of the more than 32,000 students in the state's 16 existing cyber charter schools - the most in any state - raises serious questions about these primarily online schools, and it should give the Education Department great pause. Moreover, state laws governing cyber charters require the department to review the schools every year, and to close them if they aren't meeting state standards.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
FRIDAY IS the deadline for district students to exercise their educational options: apply to a citywide high school; apply to a special admission high school; or transfer to a district neighborhood school. Students and parents can explore their choices at greatphillyschools.org, which has compiled ratings for more than 400 K-12 schools in the city. The site, run by the Philadelphia School Partnership and several nonprofit partners including the Urban Affairs Coalition, offers ratings and information on district, charter, Catholic and private schools.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | BY ANDREW EISER, Daily News Staff Writer
LUCIANA BOONE is a parent of a freshman at Philadelphia High School for Girls and an eighth-grader at KIPP West Philadelphia Charter School. Like most parents, she is concerned about the quality of the education her kids receive and, ultimately, how to find the right school for them. "Two years ago, when I was looking, for my daughter, I had to go to multiple sites and get information from a lot of different places to create my own spreadsheet, so I could compare," said Boone, a member of the Black Alliance for Educational Options, an organization supporting parental-choice policies and programs.
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