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Kabul

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NEWS
May 2, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The search begins soon after darkness falls. Huge spotlights, beamed from as many as seven different mountaintops, do a slow scan of the barren cliffs that surround the ancient city below. If something moves, if something seems to move, the spotlight stops. Sometimes firing begins. Soon the lights move on. On most nights, the sounds of battle also can be heard from beyond the first ring of craggy mountains. There's the loud blast of Soviet artillery from the big guns of the outer defense perimeter, the rat-a-tat of machine guns, the thud of mortars coming from the darkness beyond.
NEWS
November 14, 2001 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When anti-Taliban troops entered Afghanistan's capital yesterday, they received a muted welcome in a city weary from war and 37 days of American bombing. Children cheered; teenagers tossed bits of paper and candy; and adults mostly stared impassively as trucks packed with soldiers of the opposition Northern Alliance drove into the capital, horns blaring. There were no huge, enthusiastic crowds to greet the new occupation forces. Many residents had cleared out during the U.S. bombing campaign, and those who remained in the city shut down their shops yesterday for fear of a bloody battle for the capital.
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three Afghan soldiers sit and chat as they guard a large army base on the outskirts of town. Another soldier dozes in the sun. Three months ago, more than a dozen Soviet soldiers manned this post. Now, their nearby machine-gun pillbox has been deserted. In the swirling bazaars of central Kabul, people come and go with hardly a soldier around to pay heed. Three months ago, Soviet and Afghan soldiers were a constant presence, and a tank sometimes sat in the main Saray Shahzadah bazaar.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was a gaping hole in the roof of one of the mud-and-brick homes in the Khair Khanna neighborhood, where a mujaheddin rocket had exploded the day before. Several somber, still-stunned men were working to repair the hole, but they did their work with slow hands and heavy hearts. Women in a nearby room wept. They were crying for the 12-year-old boy who died when the rocket landed in the small family compound last month, and for the several women who were badly injured. But they were also crying for themselves, and for the terrible realities and complexities of the 11-year Afghan war. Because this family - like many others in Khair Khanna - is a mujaheddin family.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Soviet troops completed their withdrawal from the Afghan capital of Kabul yesterday, Moscow Radio reported. The surprise report, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., came as Afghan President Najibullah's Soviet-backed administration put Kabul under martial law yesterday, handing out weapons to its party members and vowing never to surrender to Afghan guerrillas. Ten days before the agreed-to deadline for the departure of all Soviet soldiers from Afghanistan, Moscow Radio quoted today's edition of the newspaper Pravda as saying that the last Soviet soldier left Kabul yesterday, the BBC reported.
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Technicians yesterday dusted off equipment at the studios of Afghan Television, hopeful that the national broadcaster would be operating this weekend for the first time in more than five years. "I'm happy to put something on the air for people," said Safi Abdulghani, an engineer who had been unemployed since the hard-line Taliban came to power in 1996 and banned photography, movies, music, home computers and television as anathema to Islam. With the Taliban's ouster from Kabul on Monday by opposition Northern Alliance forces, the veil is slowly lifting from Afghan society.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In the mesmerizing monologue that launches Tony Kushner's Homebody/Kabul, an Englishwoman reads excerpts from a guidebook to Kabul that is 30 years out of date. Since Kushner completed Homebody/Kabul, a marathon and demanding drama about the anguish of Afghanistan, before the unimaginable events of the last few months, you also might expect the play to be so far behind the times as to be irrelevant. But this engrossing piece, which places lost souls of various cultures in the ravaged landscape of a ruined country, has a power and eloquence that deepen and amplify our understanding of what subsequently happened by forcing us to look at it from many angles.
NEWS
May 18, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The potentially explosive theatrical ingredients are as follows: 1. A new Tony Kushner play, with the head-scratching title Homebody/Kabul. 2. A plot that deals with the tragic recent history of Afghanistan. 3. A four-hour running time. No wonder you're groping for a seat belt as the lights go down at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, where Homebody/Kabul plays through May 30. And in the opening minutes - and be on time, because latecomers aren't seated - the award-heaped author of Angels in America is firing on cylinders you didn't know he had in an hourlong monologue by a British housewife (the Homebody)
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - In the gray light of each cold dawn, the parents of 10-month-old Shoaib hold their own breath as they listen for the rasp of his, waiting to see whether their coughing, feverish little boy has survived another night. Winter's chill has settled over the Afghan capital, and with it, privation is sharpening, especially among the city's poor. Nighttime temperatures regularly fall into the teens or lower. The season's first snow is on the ground, the open sewage ditches are crusted over with ice, and in shantytowns such as the one where Shoaib's family lives, survival turns on a series of cruelly simple calculations.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
TALIBAN TROOPS were reported to have abandoned the Afghan capital of Kabul this morning, following a series of military victories by opposition forces and a withering barrage of airstrikes from U.S. warplanes. As dawn broke, eyewitnesses said the streets of Kabul were largely empty of Taliban soldiers who had been there only hours earlier. A Reuters reporter said fighters of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance - ignoring the wishes of their Western allies - entered Kabul and were roaming through the town center.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Despite Taliban gains and ISIS's emergence in Afghanistan, one amazing Kabul school continues to teach 4,000 students (half girls) to think independently and to believe in tolerance. The private Marefat school, along with its founder, Aziz Royesh, and several girl students, is the subject of Jeffrey Stern's moving new book, The Last Thousand: One School's Promise in a Nation at War . The book raises painful and very pertinent questions: Can liberal values take root in a conservative Muslim country that is threatened by Islamist radicals?
NEWS
January 2, 2016
INDIA Four gunmen killed by security forces after an attack on airbase in Punjab Four gunmen were killed by security forces after they attacked an airbase in northern India, according to local police. Two air-force personnel died while six were injured in the incident. At least five gunmen entered the site at Pathankot in the Indian state of Punjab, Ashwani Kumar, superintendent of the Punjab police, said by phone on Saturday, as the operation to clear them out was still going on. The attackers were dressed in army uniforms and suspected to be from Pakistani terror group Jaish-e-Mohammed, the Press Trust of India said, citing a security official.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Khalil Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a child growing up in Conshohocken, Paul Brown III told his mother he wanted to be a fighter pilot. As a student at the University of Pittsburgh, he joined the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps. Now 27, Brown is a captain in the Marines and is stationed in Kabul, Afghanistan. He calls that progression - from young dreamer in Montgomery County to veteran soldier on the other side of the world - his natural order of things. "There was something that always drew me to them," Brown said of the Marines.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
LEMOYNE, Pa. - Cure International has long gone where others fear to tread. The global health-care nonprofit has set up clinics in war zones and regions plagued by civil unrest since its founding in 1996, including taking over a bombed-out Red Cross hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2005. It was there that the group on Thursday suffered its first fatality as a result of violence. As news broke that an Afghan gunman had killed three Americans at the site, the spotlight turned to the group, based in a small office building on a residential street in a borough outside Harrisburg.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Chessie Vollaro arrived in Cherry Hill on Sunday, she thought she and a friend would be preparing for a beauty pageant. Instead, the 21-year-old - who returned last month from a tour in Afghanistan - was surprised by a swarm of 60 motorcyclists and Cherry Hill police and firefighters, welcoming her back to New Jersey. Standing in a driveway on Covered Bridge Road with her friend, Brittany Vaughn, who was wearing a tiara and sash, Vollaro put her hands to her mouth as motorcycles roared up the street, then began to cry. "Well, I didn't expect this at all," she told the group outside the home of Vaughn's mother, Catherine Shukdinas.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan - Militants blew up a suicide car bomb at the gate to a NATO compound in Kabul early today and attacked guards with small-arms fire, killing four guards and two civilians, police said. All four suicide attackers were also killed. Kabul provincial police chief Mohammad Ayuob Salangi said the powerful car bomb blew up about 4:30 a.m., leaving a deep crater at the first gate leading into the camp. Two truck drivers who were waiting to enter the area were killed in the blast, he said.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
At a time when American troops are leaving Afghanistan and U.S. officials are trying to talk to the Taliban, I recommend that you read a book called A Fort of Nine Towers: An Afghan Family Story . The book, by a young Afghan, Qais Akbar Omar, is an extraordinary memoir that portrays his coming of age during a time of madness. This story of his middle-class family's struggle to survive during a decade of civil war and Taliban rule is even more haunting than The Kite Runner , because it's not fiction.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Sayed Salahuddin and Kevin Sieff, Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - Insurgents launched a bold assault on the presidential palace compound in Afghanistan's capital Tuesday morning, threatening to derail a key stage in the country's peace process. All the attackers, who were disguised in foreign military uniforms and carried fake documents, were killed, the Taliban said, some when they detonated explosives and others in a gun battle with security forces. Three Afghan security guards also were killed, the Interior Ministry spokesman said.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
KABUL, Afghanistan - Taliban leaders proposed a deal in which they would free a U.S. soldier held captive since 2009 in exchange for five of their most senior operatives at Guantánamo Bay, while Afghan President Hamid Karzai eased his opposition yesterday to joining planned peace talks. The idea of releasing these Taliban prisoners has been controversial. U.S. negotiators hope they would join the peace process but fear they might simply return to the battlefield, and Karzai once scuttled a similar deal partly because he felt the Americans were usurping his authority.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Jay Price and Rezwan Natiq, McCLATCHY FOREIGN STAFF
KABUL, Afghanistan - A suicide bomber detonated an explosives-packed car outside a gate at the Afghan Supreme Court during the afternoon rush hour Tuesday, killing 17 people and wounding 38, all of them civilians, Afghan officials said. It was the second consecutive day that insurgents staged a significant suicide attack in the capital, and it raised again the question of whether the Afghan government can ensure security from Taliban attackers. On Monday, a failed Taliban attack on the military side of the Kabul airport killed seven attackers and did little damage.
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