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Kale

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FOOD
October 22, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, collards and kale are excellent sources of carotenoids. These antioxidants are believed to have anti-cancer properties and to reduce the accumulation of arterial plaque. Kale contains an incredible amount of beta-carotene (the best known of the various carotenoids), with almost twice the daily recommended allowance. Cultivated for more than 2,000 years, kale is very low in calories, rich in Vitamins A and C, folic acid, calcium and iron.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 6 servings 1 tablespoon fresh    lemon juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 teaspooon sugar 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground    pepper 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 cups torn kale leaves 2 cups torn Swiss chard leaves 4 teaspoons unsalted pumpkin       seed kernels 1/4 cup sliced green onions 1 ounce shaved fresh pecorino    Romano cheese    (about 1/4 cup) 1. Combine first five ingredients, stirring until sugar dissolves.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
1 cup fresh bread crumbs 2 cloves garlic, split in half lengthwise 1 teaspoon lemon zest Olive oil Salt 1 pound kale 4 teaspoons lemon juice 1 ounce Parmigiano-Reggiano, ? grated or shaved with a vegetable peeler   1. To toast the bread crumbs, combine them in a small saucepan with the garlic, lemon zest, and 3 tablespoons olive oil. Stir to coat well. There should be only a light trace of oil in the bottom of the pan. Season with a pinch of salt and place over medium-high heat.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Russ Parsons, LOS ANGELES TIMES
Kale is about as unlikely a food star as you can imagine. It's tough and fibrous. Bite a piece of raw kale and you'll practically end up with splinters between your teeth. Nevertheless, kale has become a green of the moment because, given a little special care, it's not only edible but delicious. You can cook it, of course, the lower and slower the better. But surprisingly, one of the most popular ways to use kale these days is in salads. Though kale leaves have always been found on almost every salad bar, it wasn't for reasons of edibility - it was for decoration, because this was one green so tough it would last forever without wilting.
FOOD
July 12, 2013 | By Michelle Dembo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Red, green, or purple. Curly, smooth, dinosaur, or lacinato. Siberian, baby, whatever - it's all kale, and it's clearly all the rage. It's on practically every menu, at both fine-dining establishments like Fork, where Eli Kulp includes kale "crisps" in a green salad, and at Morgan's Pier, one of the hippest menus of the moment, where George Sabatino offers kale croquettes. The Cedar Point Bar & Kitchen in Fishtown is shaking up kale martinis. All this from the green mostly seen as a sturdy salad-bar liner just a few years ago. Tom Culton, an organic farmer from Lancaster County popular with local chefs, grew dinosaur kale for two years before he sold it to anyone.
FOOD
March 25, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
Charlotte Codd, 11, a fifth grader at Blessed Trinity school in Mayfair, did not want to go to play practice and miss cooking class the other day. And she was trying desperately to persuade Glenn Petrucci, the vice principal. "But I want to cook soooo bad," she moaned. "I'm only in the chorus. I don't even have a speaking part. " Against her will, she was marched off to the gym to the dress rehearsal of Guys and Dolls . As I visited one of the 31 classes being taught by volunteers in the My Daughter's Kitchen healthful-cooking program, it was encouraging to see such enthusiasm.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
TECHNICALLY, kale is not a "superfood. " This cabbage-like leaf, rich in cancer-busting antioxidants and crunchy goodness, is in a class by itself, of "Super-Duper-food. " And now a super-duper-fun way to enjoy it is catching on: kale chips. I noticed the kale-chip trend (Ooh, a food trend! Must credit "V for Veg!") when Appetite for Profit author Michele Simon tweeted about making them and got a crush of replies from people, including me, who either had also just done so or wanted to. By the time I'd made my first batch, it seemed everybody was on the kale-chip bandwagon.
FOOD
January 14, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Like the once-maligned red beet (currently starring in stylish carpaccios) and, to some extent, the long-neglected parsnip, kale has trudged back from food Siberia - a tough guy, unafraid of the cold, a lion well-suited for winter. It has something of the persona, in fact, of the root vegetable, but upended, its leaves tending toward a certain leathery look (if not chew), in certain varieties as crinkled as a bad perm; in others, as dark and tall as donkey ears. You may have noted in passing that it has also been employed - or appears to have been - as a defensive shield.
FOOD
February 28, 2008 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you've been avoiding dark winter greens, assuming them too bitter, too tough, and too hard to digest, you are missing out on some delicious and highly nutritious foods. An old-fashioned, peasant image, and long cooking times, may have shadowed these dark leafy greens in the past, but they are now gracing menus at upscale restaurants all over town. And with good reason - they are among the most nutritious and popular vegetables worldwide. "Greens are not considered an elegant, rich food," said Althea Zanecosky, registered dietitian and regional spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.
FOOD
February 5, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Jack McDavid's Down Home Diner in the Reading Terminal Market serves some of the unfanciest food in town. And some of the best. Things like meatloaf and crabcakes and fried chicken, with such extras as hush puppies, homemade biscuits and red-eye gravy. Those are fairly familiar to most of his customers. But McDavid has been known to persuade a customer to try something even more humble and a lot less mainstream. Like lamb breast, for goodness' sake. And fried kale. McDavid's cooking is so simple it demands fresh ingredients, so he shops daily, sometimes hourly, for what he needs, as he needs it. The lamb breasts, like most of the meats he uses in the diner, are from Martin's Meats, a Terminal Market neighbor.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 1, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1 pound dried pasta (any short pasta like campanelle, fusilli or orecchiette works great) 1 pound chicken sausage, casings removed (see note) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon hot pepper flakes (optional) 4 cloves garlic, sliced 1 bunch kale (or swiss chard), stems removed and cut into 2-inch pieces Salt and pepper 1-2 tablespoons olive oil for drizzling Fresh grated Pecorino Romano (or Parmesan) for serving 1. Heat a pot of salted water to a boil.
FOOD
March 25, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
Charlotte Codd, 11, a fifth grader at Blessed Trinity school in Mayfair, did not want to go to play practice and miss cooking class the other day. And she was trying desperately to persuade Glenn Petrucci, the vice principal. "But I want to cook soooo bad," she moaned. "I'm only in the chorus. I don't even have a speaking part. " Against her will, she was marched off to the gym to the dress rehearsal of Guys and Dolls . As I visited one of the 31 classes being taught by volunteers in the My Daughter's Kitchen healthful-cooking program, it was encouraging to see such enthusiasm.
FOOD
March 25, 2016
Makes 6 Servings 1 pound whole wheat pasta (shells or penne work well) 4 cups kale, ribs removed and leaves chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 2 5-ounce cans salmon (look for wild-caught), opened and drained ¼ cup fresh basil, chopped (or 1 tablespoon dried basil) 1 lemon, zested and juiced 1. Fill a large pot of water, cover it, and set it on the stove on high heat to boil. 2. Once the water starts to bubble, add the pasta and cook according to the package directions (usually about 9 or 10 minutes)
FOOD
February 5, 2016
Makes 2 to 4 servings, plus extra dressing 2 large portobello mushrooms 2 tablespoons toasted sesame or grapeseed oil 1 tablespoon tamari or low-sodium soy sauce Sea salt and fresh ground pepper For the Tahini Citrus Miso Dressing: 1/2 cup tahini 2 tablespoons white or yellow miso 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 2 teaspoons sriracha or hot sauce 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar ...
FOOD
December 25, 2015
Just over two years old now, Josh Lawler and Todd Fuller's Farm & Fisherman + Tavern has settled comfortably into is mission to create a neighborhood standby serving sustainably sourced seasonal food in Cherry Hill. It hasn't always been easy in a landscape ruled by less-expensive, more generic chains. But on a recent visit, the personable staff and solid kitchen seemed more in the groove than ever. I washed down one of the area's best burgers (the Industrial) with excellent Jersey brews (Kane Head High IPA; Forgotten Boardwalk's Morro Castle smoked porter)
BUSINESS
November 16, 2015
These days, chief executive Paul Steck, 53, is a happy guy, developing a new tahini salad dressing and bubbling over the future of Saladworks L.L.C., the franchise restaurant company that began in Cherry Hill in 1986. But a year ago, Steck, then Saladworks president, was miserable, ducking under his desk, figuratively speaking, as John Scardapane, the founder and then CEO, feuded with Saladworks' major investor, Commerce Bank founder Vernon Hill. "The mental image I'll give you is two big, majestic bull elks and they're sparring with their horns and their horns lock," Steck said.
FOOD
September 18, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On busy weekday evenings in one household in Princeton, the kids are just as likely to be cooking dinner as their parents. Emily and Lyla Allen, twin sixth-graders, have culinary skills and ambitions far beyond their 11 years. Whereas most tweens favor kid-friendly classics like burgers or grilled cheese, Emily and Lyla prefer vegetables. The sisters became vegetarian (like their mom) after a farm trip during which they learned that their favorite long-eye-lashed cow would soon be butchered for meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2015 | By Ellen Gray, Daily News
THE MINDY PROJECT Tomorrow, Hulu. Mindy Kaling's ready to stop sweating the mornings after. "It's going to be nice to wake up on Wednesday mornings and not think about the ratings," Kaling said in an interview last month in Beverly Hills, Calif. As the creator and star of "The Mindy Project," which debuts its Season 4 tomorrow on Hulu, Kaling was intimately familiar with the show's Nielsen numbers at Fox, which canceled it in May. Now she no longer has to be envious of Upper Darby's Tina Fey, whose "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" was freed from the overnight Nielsens in its move from NBC to Netflix.
FOOD
May 15, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Five starched new aprons were lined up on the counter outside the kitchen, one for each student arriving for the last cooking class at Roberto Clemente Middle School in North Philadelphia. Sharon Ward, the food service worker who had been cooking with us all semester, had surprised each student with a gift of a new apron, and not the white standard issue but brightly colored ones they had wished for in class. The kids spotted them and dashed with excitement to pick their color.
FOOD
May 1, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Brittany Jordan was so excited that she was ready to burst when I arrived for cooking class at Roberto Clemente Middle School last week. "I made the chicken for my family!" she exclaimed. "It was so good! My mom was so proud," she beamed, as she pulled up a beautiful photo of nicely browned chicken drumsticks on her cellphone. "Oh, Brittany, I am so excited for you!" I said. The aspiring cook had used the marinade recipe for the honey mustard chicken wings we made in class, but adapted it, using it on drumsticks instead of wings.
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