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Kangaroo Court

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NEWS
March 13, 1987 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
One of 15 city judges recently suspended for allegedly taking cash gifts from Roofers Union Local 30-30B filed suit yesterday in federal court in an attempt to overturn the suspensions and to block further disciplinary action. Common Pleas Judge Kenneth Harris contends in the lawsuit that the state Supreme Court and its judicial review board may be "playing to public clamor" and acting like "a star chamber or kangaroo court" in suspending the 15 judges. U.S. District Judge Louis C. Bechtle was to hear arguments on the suit today, a spokesman for the judge said.
NEWS
November 27, 1986
"Don't cry for Gene Hasenfus" (editorial, Nov. 18) was a sorry example of bias. Instead of castigating the Reagan administration you should have given serious consideration to the important issues that were trivialized, and, worse, ridiculed in the editorial. The State Department and the U.S. Embassy were not on trial in Nicaragua. Eugene Hasenfus was the accused. Whatever his motives were, and whomever he worked for, he deserved the same treatment as any other person. He was certainly entitled to due process and the right not to be subjected to a kangaroo court.
SPORTS
November 6, 1998 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Washington Redskins, saddled with an Eagles-like 1-7 record, have decided there's only one way to cope - laugh it off. During the recent bye week, the then-winless Skins decided to set up a kangaroo court to inject some levity into what had been tedious and grim practices. "When you're 0-7, what have you got to lose?" asked guard Rob Milstead. Leslie Shepherd launched the kangaroo court for the receivers - drop a pass, give me 10 push-ups. The offensive linemen caught on, and soon it became 20 push-ups for a false start.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before an audience of about 200, the township's Emergency Services Council last night voted to formally recommend that the township's ambulance squad remove two of its leaders because of numerous instances of apparent abuse. However, the council cannot order the squad, which has about 36 active members, to force the removal of Captain Barbara Iavicola and President Scott Haines. That will be up to the squad's membership. But if the membership doesn't essentially fire the two leaders, the council's resolution states it would ask the Township Committee to dissolve the current ambulance squad and form another.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - House Democrats on Tuesday walked out of a legislative hearing on a measure to impeach Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, with one calling it a kangaroo court. Rep. Daryl Metcalfe, a conservative Republican from Butler County, called for the proceeding, saying Kane had exhibited "misbehavior" in office. But Democrats said the State Government Committee hearing was little more than a political stunt by Metcalfe, the committee chairman, to embarrass the Democratic attorney general.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Medford police officer who skipped his disciplinary hearing and was fired the next day will have his day in court, a Burlington County Superior Court judge ruled yesterday. Harold B. Wells 3d ruled that Mark S. Kramer, a Medford officer from 1982 until February, can present his side of the story for the first time during the unusual appeal process. In court, Kramer will be able to challenge the allegations that led to his dismissal. They include insubordination, conducting personal business while on duty, regularly associating with criminals, interfering with police investigations, and ridiculing fellow officers.
NEWS
September 15, 2005
GREAT START to the series on the Fairmount Park Commission - quite informational and very enlightening to say the least. Our organization is one of the 123 that signed the petition created by the Philadelphia Parks Alliance asking for a public forum before a special election is held to amend the city charter. I want to make it clear that we support reform. We just don't want the amendment on the November ballot, as it would not provide voters enough time to gather the information needed for an informed vote.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
Superintendent's death result of a witch-hunt Bob Martin's commentary regarding the Meyer suicide ("Chichester should review its treatment of superintendent," April 22) was right on target. Admittedly, what I know of the salient issues comes from what I have read/heard/seen in the media, but his piece made the most sense to me thus far. A bureaucratic witch-hunt and power struggle that took on a prosecutorial flavor, resulting in the death of a man who, by all reliable accounts, was a person of integrity who fell into a swamp populated by vermin and other predators.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | By Brendan McCarthy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A late afternoon court sentencing turned circus-like yesterday after a defiant Eddystone man was ordered to serve up to 37 years for beating his former wife with a hammer. Thomas Walsh, 45, shouted expletives, asked to be executed, and sang lyrics from a morose Rolling Stones song after receiving the sentence from Chester County Court Judge James P. MacElree 2d. A jury had found Walsh guilty of several charges, including aggravated and simple assault, reckless endangerment, criminal mischief, terroristic threats, and retaliation against witnesses.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Thanks to one tireless citizen with a highly developed sense of justice, we now know what it could take to defeat a $26 parking ticket and all the Kafkaesque illogic of the Philadelphia Parking Authority: about $200 in cash, much more in donated legal services, and nearly two years of patience and persistence. That most of us don't have that is precisely the point. But, as Inquirer columnist Michael Smerconish and the Daily News' Ronnie Polaneczky have documented, Todd Bernstein did. Bernstein's case began in 2011, when he parked his car on a Manayunk street subject to a one-hour limit.
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NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - House Democrats on Tuesday walked out of a legislative hearing on a measure to impeach Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, with one calling it a kangaroo court. Rep. Daryl Metcalfe, a conservative Republican from Butler County, called for the proceeding, saying Kane had exhibited "misbehavior" in office. But Democrats said the State Government Committee hearing was little more than a political stunt by Metcalfe, the committee chairman, to embarrass the Democratic attorney general.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Thanks to one tireless citizen with a highly developed sense of justice, we now know what it could take to defeat a $26 parking ticket and all the Kafkaesque illogic of the Philadelphia Parking Authority: about $200 in cash, much more in donated legal services, and nearly two years of patience and persistence. That most of us don't have that is precisely the point. But, as Inquirer columnist Michael Smerconish and the Daily News' Ronnie Polaneczky have documented, Todd Bernstein did. Bernstein's case began in 2011, when he parked his car on a Manayunk street subject to a one-hour limit.
NEWS
September 15, 2005
GREAT START to the series on the Fairmount Park Commission - quite informational and very enlightening to say the least. Our organization is one of the 123 that signed the petition created by the Philadelphia Parks Alliance asking for a public forum before a special election is held to amend the city charter. I want to make it clear that we support reform. We just don't want the amendment on the November ballot, as it would not provide voters enough time to gather the information needed for an informed vote.
NEWS
March 3, 2005
Consensus on execution I applaud the majority of the Supreme Court justices for deciding to bar the execution of people who committed crimes as juveniles. This is definitely a positive move away from some of the barbaric practices of our government that have been exposed in the last year, even as we impugn other nations on human-rights abuses. I am baffled by the claim by the dissenting justices that a national consensus against juvenile executions does not exist. In reference to the fact that 20 of 38 death-penalty states allow executing defendants under age 18, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote, "Words have no meaning if the views of less than 50 percent of death-penalty states can constitute a national consensus.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | By Brendan McCarthy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A late afternoon court sentencing turned circus-like yesterday after a defiant Eddystone man was ordered to serve up to 37 years for beating his former wife with a hammer. Thomas Walsh, 45, shouted expletives, asked to be executed, and sang lyrics from a morose Rolling Stones song after receiving the sentence from Chester County Court Judge James P. MacElree 2d. A jury had found Walsh guilty of several charges, including aggravated and simple assault, reckless endangerment, criminal mischief, terroristic threats, and retaliation against witnesses.
NEWS
May 7, 2002 | By JOHN R. COHN
THE U.N. has canceled the investigation of the Jenin refugee camp battle, Secretary-General Kofi Annan says, because of Israel's conditions concerning the manner of the investigation. The Israelis wanted protection from prosecution for their soldiers who testified, a common practice in our own courts. In a world where Israel's prime minister is threatened with prosecution for acts he was indirectly involved with 20 years ago, while Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat sends out terrorists with impunity, that is hardly unreasonable.
NEWS
October 8, 2001
A thousand words will not leave so deep an impression as one deed. - Henrik Ibsen. IT WAS A deadly deed that started this war. Deadly deeds will be required to end it. After weeks of lies, evasions and empty words from the repressive Taliban regime in Afghanistan - a regime that has murdered and enslaved its women, abused its children, and waged war on other beliefs - it was time that the United States backed its promises of retribution with...
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Medford police officer who skipped his disciplinary hearing and was fired the next day will have his day in court, a Burlington County Superior Court judge ruled yesterday. Harold B. Wells 3d ruled that Mark S. Kramer, a Medford officer from 1982 until February, can present his side of the story for the first time during the unusual appeal process. In court, Kramer will be able to challenge the allegations that led to his dismissal. They include insubordination, conducting personal business while on duty, regularly associating with criminals, interfering with police investigations, and ridiculing fellow officers.
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