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Kappa Alpha Psi

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NEWS
August 16, 1995
They ate, they drank, they partied hard. But the 5,000 members of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity left the city more than the estimated $1.6 million they spent during their national convention last week. They also left their backing for a $6.5 million conference/meeting center project in the heart of North Philadelphia. The proposed Pan-Hellenic Conference Center, in the works since 1992, will be funded primarily by the local chapters of the eight historically black Greek-letter organizations, including Kappa Alpha Psi. The center will include off-street parking, a banquet hall and office space.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julian Frederick King, 70, a former Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge and family-law attorney, died Saturday of a cerebral hemorrhage at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. King, a Philadelphia native, attended Central High School, Lincoln University, and Temple University Law School. After being admitted to the Pennsylvania bar in 1959, he worked as an assistant Philadelphia district attorney, then entered private practice. In 1974, he began a two-year term on Common Pleas Court, and in 1976, he was granted a 10-year term.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012
THE KAPPA ALPHA PSI gay-wedding video causing a stir online isn't a Kappa Alpha Psi gay wedding after all. On Thursday, one of the grooms called into the "Tom Joyner Morning Show" to say that there was absolutely no affiliation to the predominantly black Greek organization headquartered on North Broad Street. Nathanael Gay , yes, that's really his name, is a member of the venerable fraternity founded in 1911, but his husband, whose name wasn't mentioned, is not. "I was really calling today to clear the air. " said Gay, an electrical engineer based in New York City.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Yo, baby, yo, baby, yo. That was the chant as more than 2,000 members of Kappa Alpha Psi - one of the nation's oldest and most popular black fraternities - descended on the Pennsylvania Convention Center and Philadelphia Marriott last week and this weekend for their national conclave, which takes place every two years. Members packed the hotel lobby Saturday night, turning it into a sea of Kappa red and white (or crimson and cream, for those in the know). Some dressed head to toe in frat paraphernalia.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony L. Eason, 21, who is entering his junior year at Lincoln University, saw one of his dreams come true last semester. The Westbury, N.Y., native became a member of Omega Psi Phi, the predominantly black fraternity that admitted his father more than 20 years ago. Eason and 19 other Lincoln students went through a military-style induction period for the fraternity, called pledging. They were required to wear the same outfits for four weeks - gray sweat shirts, jeans, black skullcaps - and to march lock-step in single file, bark like dogs, and to speak only when spoken to by Omega fraternity members and to greet them with a salute and a booming "Greeting, big brother of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc. " That was just in public.
NEWS
July 13, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
For eight years, Kevin Battle had heard about Philadelphia's Greek Picnic in Fairmount Park. He was there yesterday to see it for himself. All it took was a mere 12 hours' drive from Indianapolis, he informed Smyrna Melvin, a physical education teacher who had driven up for the event from Austin, Texas. "I've traveled all the way here in my 450 SL Mercedes to meet pretty ladies - like you," said Battle, 27. "Yeah, but I'm not impressed," shrugged Melvin. "I want to tell you that I'm a member of Kappa Alpha Psi," continued Battle.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILLIAM "FOX" Jones had enough occupations to keep several normal people busy for a lifetime, including newspaper reporter, salesman, quality-control analyst in the pharmaceutical industry, police officer and sheriff's deputy. But the job he liked best was dignitary protection in the police department. In this role, he was assigned to protect visiting figures of international prominence, government leaders, politicians, entertainers and anyone else who might have felt safe having a tough cop nearby while in the city.
NEWS
July 9, 1988 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gwen Holston is partial to Greeks - those of the Alpha-Delta-Kappa-Omega- Beta-Sigma-Zeta-AKA persuasion, that is. In fact, those Greeks - blacks who belong to Greek-letter sororities and fraternities - have brought Holston so much business that she converted one of her two monogramming shops into a place that caters exclusively to their craving for sweaters, jackets, hats, T-shirts, license-plate holders, keychains and other paraphernalia bearing...
NEWS
July 12, 1993 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
The intricate dancing done by African-American Greek fraternal organizations and known as "stepping" started out as marching that promoted unity, discipline and bonding among fraternity brothers. Fans these days can sing, "You're not in the army now. " At Saturday's Greek Picnic Step Show at the Civic Center, members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority sauntered onto the stage to the throb of blaring hip-hop music. They wore black, clingy, sleeveless, bell-bottomed jumpsuits, vests with dangling fringes and high-heeled platform shoes.
NEWS
October 31, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1960s, "there was a lot of racial tension at Olney High School," Thomas G. Lynch IV said yesterday. Once, when a fight broke out in the cafeteria, a teacher - his father, Thomas G. III - "stood on a table and separated the racial groups, preventing it from escalating. " His father, Lynch said, told him that "he took a big risk. He could have lost his job. " Instead, "the principal at the time thought he did a tremendous thing and promoted him to vice principal.
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NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILLIAM "FOX" Jones had enough occupations to keep several normal people busy for a lifetime, including newspaper reporter, salesman, quality-control analyst in the pharmaceutical industry, police officer and sheriff's deputy. But the job he liked best was dignitary protection in the police department. In this role, he was assigned to protect visiting figures of international prominence, government leaders, politicians, entertainers and anyone else who might have felt safe having a tough cop nearby while in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012
THE KAPPA ALPHA PSI gay-wedding video causing a stir online isn't a Kappa Alpha Psi gay wedding after all. On Thursday, one of the grooms called into the "Tom Joyner Morning Show" to say that there was absolutely no affiliation to the predominantly black Greek organization headquartered on North Broad Street. Nathanael Gay , yes, that's really his name, is a member of the venerable fraternity founded in 1911, but his husband, whose name wasn't mentioned, is not. "I was really calling today to clear the air. " said Gay, an electrical engineer based in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2010
YOU HEAR statistics about how one in three local children are impoverished but it doesn't always register until you stare into the eyes of someone who's hungry and doesn't know where the next meal is coming from. Take Philadelphia-based commodities trader Tyrone L. Gilliams who knew times were hard but didn't really comprehend how badly the city's been damaged by the latest economic downturn until about a week before Thanksgiving. He had partnered with Sen. Anthony H. Williams to give away turkeys to local residents and was profoundly moved by the long line of people who showed up to claim one. "I saw people who looked like me. It wasn't your typical homeless-looking person.
NEWS
October 31, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1960s, "there was a lot of racial tension at Olney High School," Thomas G. Lynch IV said yesterday. Once, when a fight broke out in the cafeteria, a teacher - his father, Thomas G. III - "stood on a table and separated the racial groups, preventing it from escalating. " His father, Lynch said, told him that "he took a big risk. He could have lost his job. " Instead, "the principal at the time thought he did a tremendous thing and promoted him to vice principal.
NEWS
January 1, 2004 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. E. Theodore Jones, 86, of Mount Airy, a minister, educator, and former top-ranking administrator at Temple University, died Friday at Chestnut Hill Hospital of complications of Parkinson's disease. Dr. Jones became an official at Temple during a turbulent time for colleges and the country. In 1971, as college campus life was absorbed by issues from the Vietnam War to racial and gender equality, Dr. Jones carved out a mission. He would work to ensure equal access to higher education and provide a campus atmosphere conducive to learning and achievement.
NEWS
November 6, 2002 | By William Raspberry
A nd part of my uncertainty is the fact that, while both may be odious, men-only rules aren't quite in the same category as white-only rules. The line appeared in a recent column that was (in part) about Tiger Woods and the men-only membership policy of the Augusta National Golf Club. The responses - virtually all of them from women - have shocked me about as much as Harry Belafonte's out-of-the-blue attack on Colin Powell must have shocked the secretary of state. "I agree with your view most of the time, and I liked (this column)
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They did not come in the numbers they have in the past, when controversy attended Philadelphia's Greek Picnic. And when they came, they met recruiters for two organizations they might not have expected: the U.S. Army and the church. The convention of African American sorority and fraternity members and alumni from across the country, held in Fairmount Park for the last 27 years, drew about 5,000 people during the afternoon - a marked drop from its rowdy peak in the mid-1990s, when 200,000 young people flocked to the city for the picnic.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | By Melanie Burney, Jack Hagel and Rasmi Simhan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The organizers of the annual Greek Picnic worked hard to make the gathering of members of African American fraternities and sororities an invitation-only affair at Fairmount Park. Their efforts apparently paid off yesterday as a noticeably smaller crowd than in previous years turned out for the event at Belmont Plateau. An official post-picnic party at the Philadelphia Naval Business Center drew a sparse crowd but, at night, South Street was a popular venue again, drawing many who were not members of Greek-letter organizations.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julian Frederick King, 70, a former Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge and family-law attorney, died Saturday of a cerebral hemorrhage at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. King, a Philadelphia native, attended Central High School, Lincoln University, and Temple University Law School. After being admitted to the Pennsylvania bar in 1959, he worked as an assistant Philadelphia district attorney, then entered private practice. In 1974, he began a two-year term on Common Pleas Court, and in 1976, he was granted a 10-year term.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Hiliary H. "Hip" Holloway, noted attorney, business, fraternal and civic leader, died Feb. 9. He was 71 and lived in Wynnefield Heights. Holloway was a partner in the law firm of Marshall, Dennehey, Warner, Coleman & Goggin. He brought to the firm an expertise in banking and business and community experience spanning more than 40 years. As an African-American professional he had a string of "firsts," but none perhaps more satisfying that in 1995 when he was elected president of the National Interfraternal Conference, an organization representing 500,000 undergraduates and and 5 million alumni from more than 60 college fraternities on 800 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada.
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