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Kathleen Kane

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NEWS
August 14, 2015
THERE WAS high drama and porn talk, but no money shot. Instead, Kathleen Kane teased. In her first public statement since being criminally charged a week ago, the Democratic attorney general replayed the porn card, in fact doubled down. Why not? How do you not get attention with porn? She said the porn scandal she exposed last year that swallowed the jobs of several state officials and a state Supreme Court justice (Seamus McCaffery) is the sole source of her legal woes.
NEWS
February 19, 2016
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane's announcement  this week that she would not seek reelection was a foregone conclusion masquerading as a stunning revelation. Given her remote chances of victory, Kane might as well have regretfully declined to compete in the Summer Olympics. Noticeably missing from her so-called press conference, as with a long series of appearances preceding it, was any opportunity for participation by the press. Which suggests a riddle: How exactly could the attorney general have run for reelection without taking questions from reporters?
NEWS
December 3, 2015
THE WOMAN IN WHITE stood alone on a stage in the National Constitution Center. Quite a contrast to what just appeared on a large screen above the stage: samples of racist and pornographic emails, including a naked, heavyset woman with a pig snout and a curly pigtail protruding from, well, you know where. The Woman in White is also the title of an 1859 British novel involving a woman escaped from an asylum. But that's another story. This story, although it often seems like fiction, is about a woman seeking escape from bad men out to get her. So Kathleen Kane, the state attorney general who says she's been targeted - politically, criminally, constitutionally - for uncovering a network of porn-trading prosecutors, lawyers and judges now is targeting all of the above for possible crimes or ethical violations.
NEWS
January 15, 2015
IN THE EXTRAORDINARY, still-unfolding saga of Kathleen Kane, the question, of course, is what comes next? You know what's come so far. There was the rapid rise of a former assistant district attorney from Scranton to the top law-enforcement post in Pennsylvania followed by mention of higher office, including governor, senator and even president. Then a precipitous plunge marked by misstatements, a sting case she didn't pursue and now possibly facing charges for alleged grand-jury leaks about a case from 2009.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITER
While Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane has been convicted of perjury and other crimes, she does not have to resign as Pennsylvania's top law enforcement official — at least not immediately. The state constitution says public officials convicted of certain offenses, including perjury and other "infamous crimes," must step down. Over the years, however, court decisions have allowed officials to remain in office until sentencing.  The judge in Kane's case indicated that sentencing would occur within 90 days.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
MY GRANDMOTHER was suspicious, as Italian women of that generation tended to be. She knew about the evil eye, the prescriptions to guarantee a "masculine child," the book that interpreted your dreams. Karma was her middle name, and she understood that when you do one act in the vacuum of the universe, it will come back to you. Do a blessing, get a blessing. Lie, be lied unto. Make a victim, be a victim. Justice had its logic, and its rules, and while it might take a lifetime to taste it, there would be a sweet reckoning.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
GROWING UP, I was taught that some things were non-negotiable: Mass was one. The 10 p.m. summer curfew was another. Making the bed, kissing the over-perfumed relatives without a grimace and Lawrence Welk on Saturday nights were still others. But the thing that sticks out in my mind like the brightest star in a constellation, the single most important lesson taught to me by a father who seemed to sense his time was limited so he had to rush, was the absolute and uncompromising mandate that his children be honorable.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT LOOKS AS if Kathleen Kane's tenure as Pennsylvania's attorney general is about to reach a new low. Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman is expected to file criminal charges against Kane today in connection with a bizarre grand-jury investigation, a source familiar with the case said last night. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review first reported word of the impending charges yesterday afternoon. Kane's spokesman, Chuck Ardo, told the newspaper that Kane would comment if and when Ferman announced the charges.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Katz is turning his lens away from Philadelphia's history to Pennsylvania's present. The three-time mayoral candidate announced Thursday that his next documentary will focus on the saga of embattled Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane. Katz, who is seeking funding for the project, plans to call it The Kane Mutiny . Unlike his previous regionally focused documentaries with his History Making Productions - such as Philadelphia: The Great Experiment - Katz sees The Kane Mutiny as a story with national appeal because of its uniqueness, and because Kane is "such an unusual character.
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NEWS
August 19, 2016
By Noah Feldman It's never the wrongdoing - it's the lying about it. Former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, who announced her resignation Tuesday in the face of a possible 14-year sentence for her conviction on perjury charges, proves the truth of that adage for public corruption cases. Leaking grand jury proceedings to embarrass a political rival would not have gotten her sent to prison. But lying about it under oath could and will. How could a state's top law-enforcement official be so dumb?
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
SCRANTON - Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane seemed the picture of serenity Wednesday as she walked into her office for the last time as the state's top law enforcement official. "I try to live my life without any regrets," Kane, who was convicted this week of perjury and other crimes, told reporters outside her Scranton office. "I try to live every day like it's my last," she said. "I try to do the best job I can every day. And I have no regrets. I hope that people see that we've done our best.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By John Baer
NO SURPRISE, right? Kathleen Kane's conviction on nine criminal charges related to leaking grand jury data, then lying under oath to cover the leak, was widely expected. It's what we're used to in Pennsylvania, a place where so many public officials swim around in ponds of perdition, sitting ducks awaiting dispatch. Don't make me do the list. It's long, bipartisan, and depressing, though Democrats such as Kane hold a big edge in recent years. And, what? You're shocked that the state's highest law enforcement officer would break the very laws she was elected and sworn to uphold?
NEWS
August 18, 2016
ISSUE | POLITICAL CORRUPTION AG's power play is finally over I figured that it would not take long for a jury to convict Pennsylvania's fraud of an attorney general, Kathleen Kane, on grave charges, including two felony perjury counts ("Kane guilty," Tuesday). Kane had been urged repeatedly to step down, including by such fellow Democrats as Gov. Wolf, but she clung to whatever power she could even after being stripped of her law license, standing on the fiction that to step down would be to admit guilt.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, who was convicted Monday of perjury and other crimes, will resign Wednesday, her once-promising career in state politics felled by a fixation on seeking revenge against enemies that led her to break the law. In a statement announcing her intention to step down, Kane, 50, the state's first woman and first Democrat elected to the office, said only: "I have been honored to serve the people of Pennsylvania and...
NEWS
August 18, 2016
MY GRANDMOTHER was suspicious, as Italian women of that generation tended to be. She knew about the evil eye, the prescriptions to guarantee a "masculine child," the book that interpreted your dreams. Karma was her middle name, and she understood that when you do one act in the vacuum of the universe, it will come back to you. Do a blessing, get a blessing. Lie, be lied unto. Make a victim, be a victim. Justice had its logic, and its rules, and while it might take a lifetime to taste it, there would be a sweet reckoning.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITER
While Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane has been convicted of perjury and other crimes, she does not have to resign as Pennsylvania's top law enforcement official — at least not immediately. The state constitution says public officials convicted of certain offenses, including perjury and other "infamous crimes," must step down. Over the years, however, court decisions have allowed officials to remain in office until sentencing.  The judge in Kane's case indicated that sentencing would occur within 90 days.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
After two years of pledging to fight, of promising to air the truth in the face of all those bent on railroading her, the opportunity had finally arisen for Kathleen Kane to stand up in court and tell her side under oath. The time had finally come for the state's top law enforcement official to speak in her own defense. She chose silence. An attorney general on trial for perjury and official oppression for allegedly leaking secret grand jury material and lying about it, crimes that could cost her her law license and freedom, decided now that she had nothing to say. After hearing the prosecution's evidence, her lead attorney, famed mob lawyer Gerald Shargel, thought it best that Kane stay mum. The attorney general agreed with the mob lawyer.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
A jury of six men and six women was selected Monday to decide the fate of Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, clearing the way for opening arguments Tuesday in Norristown. "We have our jury," Common Pleas Court Judge Wendy Demchick-Alloy announced after a nine-hour selection process. She said Kane's trial on perjury, conspiracy, obstruction, and other charges would last a week. Earlier in the day, the judge read a list of people who will either be witnesses at the trial or whose names may come up in testimony.
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