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Kauffman

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NEWS
August 28, 1990 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former State Supreme Court Justice Bruce W. Kauffman said yesterday he was "astounded" at the allegation that he met furtively with Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. as part of a vendetta against Justice Rolf Larsen. In legal papers filed last week, Larsen accused Kauffman and Nix of having a "bold and outrageous" meeting July 21 at Kauffman's house at the Jersey shore. The meeting, Larsen said, was "away from the eyes and ears of Philadelphia, indeed out of the state of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
A 24-year-old West Philadelphia man who borrowed a Yellow Cab from a relative on Dec. 21, 1985, and then posed as a cab driver to pick up a 29- year-old woman in Center City, yesterday admitted that he raped and robbed her. After pleading guilty to rape, robbery and a weapons offense, Richard McDonald of Chestnut Street near 62nd was sentenced to eight to 20 years in prison. Assistant District Attorney Amanda Kauffman said the woman got into the cab at Broad and Pine streets, and asked to be driven to her North Philadelphia home.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
In Grandfather's day, crab apple trees had mixed reputations. In the spring, they produced glorious blooms. But by the family picnic in August, they already had dropped countless diseased leaves on the lawn. Then, they frequently produced rather messy fruit that had to be swept from the walk or patio. "Crabs have changed," says J. Richard Kauffman, president of London Grove Nursery Inc., a wholesale tree nursery near Avondale. "Thanks to extensive study conducted by Penn State and other universities, researchers have developed crabs resistant to the diseases that caused them to lose their leaves so early in the year, and many of the newer varieties have smaller fruit, more like that of a holly, which will often remain on the tree until the following spring.
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jury selection began yesterday in the racketeering trial of Imam Shamsud-din Ali after a missing codefendant found his way to court. John Johnson, who failed to show up on Monday, was present for the start of the process, but his lawyer argued that he might not be physically or mentally capable of taking part in the six- to eight-week trial. Johnson suffered a "cardiac episode," attorney Marc Neff told U.S. District Judge Bruce W. Kauffman, and "lacked the strength" to either answer the door or make a phone call Monday while the FBI and U.S. Marshals Service were attempting to serve a bench warrant issued by the judge.
NEWS
May 25, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city and the CSX Transportation railroad, squabbling over the Locust Street gateway to the spanking-new Schuylkill River Park, have asked a federal judge to help them resolve their dispute. CSX, whose tracks cross Locust Street right at the entrance to the park, wants to close off the street entirely and, in January, asked U.S. District Judge Bruce W. Kauffman to order the city not to interfere. So far undeterred, the city has fought to keep the crossing - and direct access to the park - open at both Locust and Race Streets and has suggested installing mechanical gates and signal systems at the crossings.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | By Penelope M. Carrington, Special to The Inquirer
For New York City in the early 1930s, it was the opening of the 1,414-foot Empire State Building. For Ardmore, it was the 120-foot Times Medical building that was the original home to the Main Line Daily Times and the first Strawbridge & Clothier department store in the Philadelphia suburbs. "When New York was opening the Empire State Building, Ardmore was opening this, and I'll bet the people of Main Line were just as excited," said J. Kenneth Kauffman of Williams Jackson Ewing Inc. in Baltimore.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | By Robin Clark and Daniel R. Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joseph H. Weiss, a Philadelphia lawyer and publishing executive, has been suspended from practicing law, almost six years after he admitted paying off a police inspector to overlook prostitution at a Center City massage parlor. The state Supreme Court on Thursday ruled 4-1, with two justices abstaining, to strip Weiss, 47, of his license to practice law in Pennsylvania for four years. The suspension is retroactive to December 1987. The court's decision to backdate the suspension drew immediate criticism from a disciplinary-law specialist, who said it was unprecedented for the court to rely on an errant lawyer's claim that he had stopped practicing.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A girlfriend of the handyman accused of last month's killing of an East Mount Airy grandmother testified Wednesday that he told her: "I caught a body. " Testifying at the preliminary hearing for Leroy Wilson, 37, Micshell Hoskins said Wilson went to her North Philadelphia home sometime after 3 a.m. on June 28 - within hours after medical experts say Regina Brunner-Holmes was slain in her house in the 300 block of East Roumfort Road. "Did you know what he meant when he said he 'caught a body'?"
NEWS
July 27, 2007 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The trial of a South Jersey millionaire accused of traveling overseas to molest boys again teetered on the verge of a mistrial yesterday as his defense team announced that a key witness is refusing to testify because of threats prompted by American authorities. Defense attorney Mark Geragos said he had arranged for the witness, Victor Levintsa, to testify via a video feed from Moldova, but Levintsa told Geragos that police there had informed him that he was under investigation at the behest of the United States embassy.
NEWS
July 7, 2005 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Facing prison for his role in a corruption scheme, former City Council aide Steven Vaughn yesterday suggested an alternate sentence: teaching city staffers about right and wrong. "I could be used to educate people . . . because you don't get a book that tells you what you can and can't do," Vaughn told a federal judge shortly before he was sentenced to five months in prison. In fact, said the former chief of staff to Councilwoman Donna Reed Miller: "I was really surprised, when the Council members were talking about ethics, that they didn't call me to seek me out. I thought I could be a resource, because there are a lot of staff members in City Hall - good people - who could be caught up in things that they just don't realize they are doing wrong.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
On chilly fall nights, there is nothing quite as cozy as a mug of hot cider - except for a mug of hot cider spiked with a shot of Snap. When added at the last moment, this ginger- and molasses-infused liqueur from Philadelphia's Art in the Age, inspired by Pennsylvania Dutch ginger bread, has the effect of an instant mulling spice. I didn't expect to like this so much. I haven't had much luck with Art in the Age's line of boldly flavored organic liqueurs, which, such as Root, are so commandingly distinctive they do not always play nice as congenial mixers in cocktails, where they tend to overpower.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A girlfriend of the handyman accused of last month's killing of an East Mount Airy grandmother testified Wednesday that he told her: "I caught a body. " Testifying at the preliminary hearing for Leroy Wilson, 37, Micshell Hoskins said Wilson went to her North Philadelphia home sometime after 3 a.m. on June 28 - within hours after medical experts say Regina Brunner-Holmes was slain in her house in the 300 block of East Roumfort Road. "Did you know what he meant when he said he 'caught a body'?"
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO will let a Florida king snake crawl through one sleeve of his robe and out the other is a man to be reckoned with. And then there was the iguana that had free rein of his home in Wayne and later Berwyn. In fact, the king snake had free rein, too, until his wife put her foot down. It is now in a tank. But Joel M. Kauffman was a man to be reckoned with for many other reasons, as well. A prominent chemist, researcher and medical writer, he would receive several hundred emails daily from people who just wanted to pick his brain.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin Kauffman, 88, an accountant, educator, and former Wynnewood resident, died Tuesday, July 1, of complications from a stroke at Beth Israel Hospital, Boston. Mr. Kauffman was born in South Philadelphia, the son of a first-generation immigrant father from Kiev, and a mother who was a citizen. "Ducky," as he was called, excelled at high school football, baseball, and sprinting. After graduating from Southern Philadelphia High School, he enlisted in the Army and served in the European Theater.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the broken concrete of Deemer's Beach, you can see north up the Delaware River toward Philadelphia, south down Delaware Bay toward the Atlantic, and east over two miles of sun-tipped waves to hazy New Jersey to get a sense of what people lost when they turned their backs on the waterfront. "There was the tidal bathing pool, and the trolley, and the baseball ground, and the roller rink, and the dance hall, and the arcade, and the 1,500-foot-pier, and the place where the Wilson Line ships used to dock," said Harold West, owner of the property since 1987.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
MAYS LANDING, N.J. — Dan Danchak was supposed to meet April Kauffman at his American Legion post in Somers Point on Friday night to smoke a "victory cigar" with her. Instead, Danchak, a Vietnam veteran who had worked with Kauffman, and her husband, James, a prominent area physician, on veterans' health care issues, was mourning her death. The 47-year-old Kauffman, a grandmother, local radio personality, and entrepreneur known affectionately by friends as "Air Strike April," was found shot to death in the master bedroom of her Linwood home on Thursday morning.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
HARRY KAUFFMAN didn't like to talk about his Army experiences in World War II. Like a lot of veterans, he felt much of it was better not resurrected, too many bad memories better left buried and forgotten. However, some events came out gradually over the years, and often inadvertently. As a prisoner of the Germans during the Battle of the Bulge, he recalled, he found a horse's head in the bucket of soup the prisoners were given for food. A fellow prisoner was a Philadelphian named Hal Albertson, who Harry found out had a child back home.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling himself a monster, James Lee Troutman begged detectives to kill him hours after confessing to raping and strangling 9-year-old neighbor Skyler Kauffman. That was last year. On Monday, he decided he wanted to live. An emotionless Troutman pleaded guilty in a Montgomery County courtroom to charges of first-degree murder, kidnapping, sexual assault, and abuse of a corpse, two months before a jury was to hear his case. As part of a plea agreement with prosecutors, Troutman, 25, of Souderton, was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole and an additional 10 to 20 years.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling himself a monster, James Lee Troutman begged detectives to kill him hours after confessing to raping and strangling 9-year-old neighbor Skyler Kauffman. That was last year. On Monday, he decided he wanted to live. An emotionless Troutman pleaded guilty in a Montgomery County courtroom to charges of first-degree murder, kidnapping, sexual assault, and abuse of a corpse, two months before a jury was to hear his case. As part of a plea agreement with prosecutors, Troutman, 25, of Souderton, was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole and an additional 10 to 20 years.
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