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Keith Sweat

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1998 | By Peter Goldman, FOR THE INQUIRER
K-Ci and JoJo milked almost 15 minutes out of their recent smash single "All My Life" during Friday night's R & B show at the CoreStates Center. This extended version of the song was variously charming (the duo hugged onstage), uncomfortable (audience members were asked to hold hands and say, "Neighbor, I love you"), and even hip (via JoJo's brief rasta reggae mash). Focusing mostly on material from their year-old debut album, Love Always, the ex-members of the group Jodeci touched on just one cut - the 1993 remake of Stevie Wonder's "Lately" - from Jodeci's healthy hit bank.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
BLACKSTREET, NEW EDITION, KEITH SWEAT AND 702. 7:30 p.m. Sunday, CoreStates Center, Broad Street below Pattison Avenue. Tickets: $37.50. Charge: 215-336-2000. Fans and journalists keep telling Teddy Riley that his group Blackstreet is getting a raw deal on its current tour with Keith Sweat and New Edition. "The sequencing of the show doesn't seem quite right," Riley concurred in a recent phone chat. "After a warmup by 702, we come out and get to do a 35-minute set. So we have to hit the people fast and hard, to get the audience really charged up. Then Keith comes out for about 40 minutes, doing mostly ballads.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a big indie-rock weekend, with shows Saturday and Sunday showcasing independent-spirited artists - creative standard-bearers of music-making who operate outside the alternative mainstream. Leading post-punk sensitive singer-songwriter Lou Barlow brings his Boston-based trio Sebadoh to the TLA on Saturday. On the new Harmacy (SubPop), Barlow, Jason Loewenstein and Bob Fay move Sebadoh further away from its lo-fi roots with a crisp collection that avoids the cloudy confusion of the band's early efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1997 | By Pete Goldman, FOR THE INQUIRER
It didn't take 20/20 vision to see that a significant number of seats were empty at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts at Saturday night's Jamizon Tour concert. What's not as clear is why the stage was also missing people - musicians, that is. The concert's first three hours featured girl groups SWV, Brownstone, and newcomer Shades, all singing over prerecorded tracks of beats and background vocals. Is glorified karaoke really worth ticket prices in the $30 vicinity? The only act to use a live band was headliner Keith Sweat, unless you count Mark Morrison's "set.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | By Jim Gladstone, Special to The Inquirer
The "Woof! Woof!" cheers that have been the rage at recent R&B concerts gave way to yelps of puppy love last night as winsome quintet New Edition topped a triple bill that included former group member Bobby Brown and snazzy newcomer Al B. Sure. From the pink billows of cotton candy sold in the aisles of the Spectrum to the Bugs Bunny cartoons shown before starting time, the program seemed perfectly designed to please the young, squeaky-clean teenage crowd. But then the music started.
NEWS
February 5, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Nobody's ever lost a buck overestimating the baby boom appetite for nostalgia, as theater managers across America discovered during last weekend's re-release of "Star Wars. " "I was expecting it to be busy, but I wasn't expecting it to be this crazy. I didn't think a 20-year-old movie would retain this kind of massive interest after all this time," said Ron Angeli, general manager of the United Artists Theater at RiverView Plaza, on Delaware Avenue, where eight shows sold out on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
Somehow, music just sounds better in the summer, whether it's blasting from your boom box, your Jeep or your grandma's old Victrola. From rap to rock, there will be plenty of hot new records to pump up any system you have this season. On the rap tip, summer releases include Arrested Development's much- anticipated "Zingalamaduni" (released last week), which provides a fresh alternative to all the gangsta rap. Also releasing a sophomore set, "Same As It Ever Was" (out June 28), is House of Pain, the Irish rappers who made the entire hip-hop nation jump around the first time around.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
At a time when rhythm and blues, soul, funk, rap and every other familiar style of "black" music seems to be changing, intermingling to emerge as the hit styles of Bobby Brown, Al B Sure!, Keith Sweat and others, producers are scouring the landscape to find performers with the talent to make these hybrids work. When rap guru Russell Simmons took a look around, he saw Blue Magic. You don't get to be Simmons without good eyes and ears - and you certainly don't get where Blue Magic is without good voices.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Leon Russell, Tulsa, Okla.'s greatest gift to country rock, is tearing it up at the Chestnut Cabaret tomorrow along with Texas tornado Edgar Winter. Russell's barrelhouse keyboard style and growling, gospel-fired vocals used to bless the airwaves regularly, and have fortified the likes of Jerry Lee Lewis, Delaney & Bonnie, Joe Cocker, Bob Dylan and dozens of Phil Spector acts. So I'm sure Leon will now make the most of his new association with multi-instrumentalist and singer Winter.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
With his new "Dangerous" LP perched atop Billboard's R&B album chart, Michael Jackson tries to reclaim the street, the soul brothers and sisters who were down wit' him when he was bad. But it's not where you're from, it's where you're at. And Michael doesn't even know if he's black or white anymore. The latest releases by R&B heavies Keith Sweat, Jody Watley and Lisa Stansfield show just how far out of touch Michael is with the Boyz and Girlz in the Hood. They represent different shades of contemporary soul that separate the hip from the hype.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
C HARLES BARKLEY may be turning 50 Wednesday, but he doesn't foresee any midlife crisis. "I don't even know what that is. I've heard about it, technically," the Round Mound of Rebound told me. "My life, if you want to talk about fairy tales, mine's it. " Barkley's one plan: Be more reflective in the future. That goal starts tonight as Barkley looks back on his life in a Comcast Sportsnet special at 7 p.m., called "Barkley at 50. " Barkley will be joined by CSN's Neil Hartman and Jim Lynam , Barkley's former coach, who traded him out of Philly in '92. Barkley doesn't usually celebrate his b-day, but he did share one birthday buddy during his NBA heyday: Michael Jordan , who also recently turned 50. "He's three days older than me," Barkley said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1998 | By Peter Goldman, FOR THE INQUIRER
K-Ci and JoJo milked almost 15 minutes out of their recent smash single "All My Life" during Friday night's R & B show at the CoreStates Center. This extended version of the song was variously charming (the duo hugged onstage), uncomfortable (audience members were asked to hold hands and say, "Neighbor, I love you"), and even hip (via JoJo's brief rasta reggae mash). Focusing mostly on material from their year-old debut album, Love Always, the ex-members of the group Jodeci touched on just one cut - the 1993 remake of Stevie Wonder's "Lately" - from Jodeci's healthy hit bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1997 | By Pete Goldman, FOR THE INQUIRER
It didn't take 20/20 vision to see that a significant number of seats were empty at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts at Saturday night's Jamizon Tour concert. What's not as clear is why the stage was also missing people - musicians, that is. The concert's first three hours featured girl groups SWV, Brownstone, and newcomer Shades, all singing over prerecorded tracks of beats and background vocals. Is glorified karaoke really worth ticket prices in the $30 vicinity? The only act to use a live band was headliner Keith Sweat, unless you count Mark Morrison's "set.
NEWS
February 5, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Nobody's ever lost a buck overestimating the baby boom appetite for nostalgia, as theater managers across America discovered during last weekend's re-release of "Star Wars. " "I was expecting it to be busy, but I wasn't expecting it to be this crazy. I didn't think a 20-year-old movie would retain this kind of massive interest after all this time," said Ron Angeli, general manager of the United Artists Theater at RiverView Plaza, on Delaware Avenue, where eight shows sold out on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
BLACKSTREET, NEW EDITION, KEITH SWEAT AND 702. 7:30 p.m. Sunday, CoreStates Center, Broad Street below Pattison Avenue. Tickets: $37.50. Charge: 215-336-2000. Fans and journalists keep telling Teddy Riley that his group Blackstreet is getting a raw deal on its current tour with Keith Sweat and New Edition. "The sequencing of the show doesn't seem quite right," Riley concurred in a recent phone chat. "After a warmup by 702, we come out and get to do a 35-minute set. So we have to hit the people fast and hard, to get the audience really charged up. Then Keith comes out for about 40 minutes, doing mostly ballads.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a big indie-rock weekend, with shows Saturday and Sunday showcasing independent-spirited artists - creative standard-bearers of music-making who operate outside the alternative mainstream. Leading post-punk sensitive singer-songwriter Lou Barlow brings his Boston-based trio Sebadoh to the TLA on Saturday. On the new Harmacy (SubPop), Barlow, Jason Loewenstein and Bob Fay move Sebadoh further away from its lo-fi roots with a crisp collection that avoids the cloudy confusion of the band's early efforts.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
Somehow, music just sounds better in the summer, whether it's blasting from your boom box, your Jeep or your grandma's old Victrola. From rap to rock, there will be plenty of hot new records to pump up any system you have this season. On the rap tip, summer releases include Arrested Development's much- anticipated "Zingalamaduni" (released last week), which provides a fresh alternative to all the gangsta rap. Also releasing a sophomore set, "Same As It Ever Was" (out June 28), is House of Pain, the Irish rappers who made the entire hip-hop nation jump around the first time around.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
With his new "Dangerous" LP perched atop Billboard's R&B album chart, Michael Jackson tries to reclaim the street, the soul brothers and sisters who were down wit' him when he was bad. But it's not where you're from, it's where you're at. And Michael doesn't even know if he's black or white anymore. The latest releases by R&B heavies Keith Sweat, Jody Watley and Lisa Stansfield show just how far out of touch Michael is with the Boyz and Girlz in the Hood. They represent different shades of contemporary soul that separate the hip from the hype.
NEWS
December 24, 1990 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with other soul singers, Johnny Gill is only a baby. But when he opens his mouth, he puts some older men to shame. Friday night at the Spectrum, Gill, 23, was an opening act on a multiple bill with Bell Biv DeVoe, Keith Sweat and Monie Love. Sweat presents himself as smooth and sexy, but Gill showed the near- capacity audience that he may be the heir apparent to the sweet soul-song tradition advanced by Marvin Gaye in the '60s, Teddy Pendergrass in the '70s and Luther Vandross in the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
At a time when rhythm and blues, soul, funk, rap and every other familiar style of "black" music seems to be changing, intermingling to emerge as the hit styles of Bobby Brown, Al B Sure!, Keith Sweat and others, producers are scouring the landscape to find performers with the talent to make these hybrids work. When rap guru Russell Simmons took a look around, he saw Blue Magic. You don't get to be Simmons without good eyes and ears - and you certainly don't get where Blue Magic is without good voices.
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