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Kelley

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SPORTS
April 13, 1991 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
Monday's 95th running of the Boston Marathon will offer another occasion to celebrate the most enduring performer in the history of the event, one who is refusing, once more, to act his age. John A. "The Elder" Kelley, an 83-year-old medical marvel, will start the 26-mile, 385-yard course between Hopkinton and downtown Boston for the 60th time. That's right, the 60th time, and what's all this fuss about Nolan Ryan's 24th season? "I don't know where the years have gone," Kelley said earlier this week, his running ruminations influenced in equal measure by Mickey Rooney and George Bush.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Months of speculation ended yesterday as the University of Pennyslvania announced a change in top leadership at its financially troubled health system, which includes the flagship Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Penn President Judith Rodin said in a statement that Dr. William N. Kelley was being replaced as dean of Penn's School of Medicine and chief executive of its medical center and health system. Taking over on an interim basis is Dr. Peter G. Traber, 44, a Johnstown, N.Y., native who graduated from the University of Michigan in 1977.
SPORTS
June 18, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
B.G. Kelley, head boys' basketball coach at Philadelphia's International Christian High School, has stepped down after five seasons. "The time was right," said Kelley, who compiled a 94-27 record during his tenure. "Basketball has always been one of my passions. I flat-out love basketball. "I enjoyed my time there and I enjoyed the kids. I hope I helped them become better players - and young men. " Kelley, a 1959 graduate of Roman Catholic and a 1965 Temple graduate, will continue to teach writing at the school.
SPORTS
February 9, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
South Carolina might want to face Florida again in the Southeastern Conference tournament. It's about the only league team the Gamecocks match up well against. Tre' Kelley scored 17 points, made three free throws in the final 26 seconds and had a key steal down the stretch that helped South Carolina upset the No. 7 Gators, 71-67, last night. The Gamecocks (12-10, 3-6) ended the second-longest home winning streak in the nation at 20 games and swept Florida for the first time since the 1997-98 season.
REAL_ESTATE
March 19, 1995 | By Sally Downey, FOR THE INQUIRER
A century ago, Paradise seemed an apt name for a place full of angels - marble angels, guarding the graves and mausoleums in the several cemeteries along Ridge Avenue in the southwest corner of North Philadelphia. The name continued to be used long after farmland around the cemeteries filled with factories and homes. But these days, Allegheny West is the more frequently used name for the area that lies north of Laurel Hill Cemetery, mostly along the east side of Hunting Park Avenue.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a dramatic case of reality trumping mobfather fiction. The Rev. Joseph J. Kelley, a 43-year-old Catholic priest, stepped to the witness box of federal court last month and vouched for his "distant cousin," reputed mobster Joey Merlino. Then Kelley, testifying that he knew the jailed Merlino was charged with drug trafficking and threats, offered to supervise Merlino personally if he were granted bail. Kelley's day in court on July 28 was both a rarity and a "personal decision" that needed no clearance from higher-ups, according to Cathy Rossi, director of communications for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.
LIVING
February 5, 1999 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Kelley, 10, likes to line up her dolls on chairs and be a teacher. She'll tell them to sit up straight and do their numbers. Then they'll sing, with Kelley's voice the loudest of all: "If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!" Her brother, Donelle, 11, also has favorite indoor activities. He likes listening to music on the radio, playing chess and checkers, and doing book reports and games on the computer. They're doing well in school. Kelley gets A's in special-education classes, on a fourth-grade level.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Normally, a $30 million penalty against your employer, and the ensuing rash of bad headlines, isn't the best the way to launch your campaign to get re-hired. But that scenario didn't seem to hurt Dr. William N. Kelley, dean of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, who's just been re-upped for a new five-year stint. Penn president Judith Rodin - who had announced a review of Kelley after the whopping settlement over Medicare billing abuses at a Penn medical practice Kelley headed - told faculty members in a memo early this month that she and provost Stanley Chodorow have recommended the doctor win a new appointment.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell yesterday lost a skirmish in state court in her fight to get fired aide Michael Youngblood returned to her Council staff. Commonwealth Court Judge James R. Kelley refused to vacate a stay of Common Pleas Court Judge Russell M. Nigro's ruling May 6, which said Blackwell was entitled to rehire the aide immediately. The stay went into effect when Council President John F. Street, who fired Youngblood in February 1993, citing the aide's criminal record, appealed Nigro's ruling to Commonwealth Court.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
When Dr. William Nimmons Kelley took over as the head of the city's biggest and most prestigious medical center, he inherited a hospital that was hemorrhaging tens of millions of dollars a year. But within a year of being named chief executive officer of University of Pennsylvania Medical Center and Health System, the hospital posted its first profit in years. And since then, the profits have multiplied. What changed? The billing system. In an interview with the Philadelphia Inquirer in October 1990, Kelley gave much of the credit for the financial turnaround to a revamped accounting system that coordinated the expenses and billing of the medical center's biggest departments: The hospital, the medical school, and the private faculty practice, known as Clinical Practices.
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NEWS
October 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU CITY KIDS don't know what it's like to have to go out in the back yard and kill your own food. Florence Kelley might have used words to that effect when describing her upbringing on a farm in Abbeville, S.C. Florence was up at the crack of dawn to feed the chickens and milk the cows and lead them out to pasture. The farm animals also provided food for the table, and somebody had to go out there and get it. "She told us we were lucky not to have to kill our own food," her family said.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacquelyn Y. Kelley, 60, of Philadelphia, founder and CEO of Discovery Charter School, died Sunday, June 1, of an infection at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mrs. Kelley was a gifted educator and entrepreneur who devoted her life to the city's schoolchildren. "She had a vision, and she made sure she saw it all the way through," said her daughter, Kimberly S. Kelley. Mrs. Kelley rose through the ranks in the Philadelphia School District before becoming chief instructional officer for a start-up charter school.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia School District elementary schools will receive grants totaling $3 million to upgrade their academics as they absorb students from nearby schools that have closed. The Philadelphia School Partnership announced Wednesday that William D. Kelley in Brewerytown and James G. Blaine in Strawberry Mansion would each receive a $1.5 million grant over several years to develop academic turnaround plans. The schools were among several that applied to the partnership's Great Schools Fund for assistance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | Cpompiled by The Inquirer Staff
Once upon a time, there was a time before Wi-Fi - or even the Net. They did have TVs back then. Even sitcoms. And sitcom stars. Robin Williams , 62, was a TV star way back then, when there was no Internet. This fall, he'll return to network TV in David E. Kelley 's The Crazy Ones on CBS. It's been so long, the Mork and Mindy alumnus says, "the last time I was on TV, wired meant a gram and a bottle of Jack Daniel's. " (Williams famously battled substance abuse problems back then, in the olden times.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - David E. Kelley has a fast car. His name is Robin Williams. From the moment that CBS announced that Williams would star in "The Crazy Ones," a new comedy from Kelley ("The Practice," "Ally McBeal") in which the free-associating comedian and actor plays a wild and, well, crazy advertising genius, I've wondered how that might work. Because Kelley's a writer used to hearing his words delivered pretty much the way he wrote them. And that isn't necessarily what people expect from a Robin Williams comedy.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
D. Scott Kelley, 72, of Bryn Mawr, a lawyer who managed the trusts and estates of clients as a sole practitioner for nearly 50 years, died Saturday, July 13, of heart disease at Penn Presbyterian Hospital. From 1976 on, Mr. Kelley worked from a home office. He enjoyed researching the fine points of the law and developing ongoing relationships with his clients. "Mr. Kelley greatly assisted our family when our parents became unable to care for themselves. My brother and I owe Mr. Kelley much gratitude for all he did during those very difficult years.
SPORTS
May 30, 2013 | By Sara Cavanagh, For The Inquirer
Kelley Farmer amassed 1301/2 points Wednesday to win the Leading Hunter Rider title at the Devon Horse Show, dethroning Scott Stewart, who had won that distinction 11 times, including the last 10 years in a row. "To dethrone Scott, it's amazing," said Farmer, of Keswick, Va. "I'm sure there will be payback. But what an honor. " Farmer rode Back Story to the Green Conformation Hunter championship and to the Reserve Championship in Regular Conformation Hunters, behind Stewart on the champion, Showman.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
The Florida socialite with Philly roots who inadvertently toppled a CIA director has finally spelled out her side of the story. Jill Kelley told Howard Kurtz of thedailybeast.com that she was threatened with blackmail, didn't know the threats came from a woman, never pressed charges, never swapped 30,000 e-mails with a general, and never asked for an $80 million fee to land a deal with South Korea. In November, just after the presidential election, David Petraeus, who rose to fame as commander of allied military forces in Afghanistan, resigned as CIA chief, amid allegations of an affair with biographer Paula Broadwell.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA, FLA. - Jill Kelley wants the world to know that she didn't do anything wrong when she befriended top military brass. The Tampa socialite at the center of a scandal involving Gen. David Petraeus has hired a top Washington attorney and seems to be trying to change the narrative about her friendship with the general, her past and her role as an "honorary consul" to the country of South Korea. On Tuesday, Kelley's attorney Abbe Lowell released emails, telephone recordings and other material that he and Kelley say proves she never tried to exploit her friendship with Petraeus.
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