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Kente Cloth

BUSINESS
February 24, 1992 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Janet Uzoamaka Nwizugbo smiles warmly as a customer comes in the door. "Hello, sister," she says in a charming, musical accent shaped by her years in Nigeria, England, Jamaica and - for the last 10 years - the United States. The customer, a substitute teacher, smiles back and says she has fallen in love with Nwizugbo's store, which is called: Uzoamaka. In the Ibo language of Nigeria, Uzoamaka means "the way is beautiful. " And beauty and color collide in a kaleidoscope of hues, fabrics and jewelry from around the world in the store at 2047 Walnut St., near Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
December 4, 1995 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He wore an outrageously bright red suit, and his white curly whiskers bobbed when he laughed. But this Santa Claus was different from many seen in the malls and the jolly old man depicted in most books. Sandra Evans said she opened the Santa Shop, at Park Plaza in Edgewater Park, "to fulfill a community need. . . . There was no place for African American people to take their children to an ethnic Santa. " Evans, the proprietor of the 5-year-old Panache Ethnic Collectibles and Fine Art store, which features African items, said she decided to create a Santa Shop next door because "children of ethnic background need to have a Santa that looks like them.
LIVING
September 4, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
From the curb, the home of Molefi Kete Asante and his wife Ana Yenenga looks like many well-manicured stone split levels in Elkins Park. Inside, however, it springs to life with striking signs of African heritage around every corner. And no wonder. Molefi Asante, 67, professor and former chairman of the Department of African American Studies at Temple University, has earned international recognition as one of the most distinguished scholars in his field, with no fewer than 70 books to his credit.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1994 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
The McDonald's at 52nd and Chestnut streets in West Philadelphia reopened yesterday after being hit by fire last year. The revamped eatery is Afrocentric - it features African-American art and will eventually offer some black-oriented foods, such as sweet potato pie, store officials say. Workers, like Tamika Ledbetter (above), wear sun visors sporting a kente cloth pattern. At left, Keith Hudson, 7, enjoys breakfast.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal contributed to this report
BLOWING COOL AIR: Surprise your friends. Get the home cooling maintenance stuff done before sweating season. FOR CENTRAL AIR UNITS: Figure on paying a pro between $35 and $40 to start things up by cleaning the condenser and checking the filters, belts and freon level. (For fear of getting zapped with 230 volts or worse, do not attempt any of this yourself, the AC experts at the Orleans Technical Institute on Rhawn Street advise.) FOR WINDOW UNITS: Install at a slight tilt to insure proper drainage.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
Kente cloth, jewelry, dolls, books and silk scarves are some of the items that will be available Saturday at the second annual African-American Arts Festival at the Burlington Center in Burlington Township. From 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., shoppers will be able to browse and purchase artwork made and sold by African-Americans from throughout the area. The one-day festival will feature not only crafts, clothing and foods that have an African flavor but also paintings and prints by local black artists.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
We pray that we lose our empty ability to rap and quote. For Lord, you know that we can rap our heads off. And Lord, you know we can quote Marcus, Malcolm, Martin, Jesus and all the great revolutionaries of our time, while we sit on our principles and do nothing. - From "A Liberation Mass," celebrated yesterday at St. Thomas. When the Rev. Jesse Anderson Jr. accepted the pulpit once filled by his late father at African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, he found a rich history and a discouraging present.
LIVING
April 11, 2000 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ballet Florida's Philadelphia debut this past weekend at the Annenberg Center showed a company of talent and discernment. Credit goes to artistic director Marie Hale for smart programming and commissioning initiatives for this company from Palm Beach. Four Last Songs, choreographed by Ben Stevenson to the songs by Richard Strauss, is a dance for its ballerinas. Wendy Laraghy's light curves, Janine Harris' near-weightless turns and arabesques, and Gina Patterson's silky, arching back and arms embodied the song lines one after another.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1990 | By Sara M. Lomax, Daily News Staff Writer
THE MERCHANT OF ALKEBULAN 3744 Germantown Ave. 226-3240. Hours: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Education is the theme at the Merchant of Alkebulan, a North Philadelphia shop brimming with African wares. On this day, the voices from a video documentary on African life fill the spacious store. Tomorrow you may hear the voice of Louis Farrakhan or educator Jawanza Kunjufu. Swinging from the ceiling are T-shirts emblazoned with diagrams of Africa and names and explanations of historic figures like Imhotep, Hannibal, Hatshepsut and Pope Victor.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
For devotees of Katharine Drexel, the Native American flavor to her feast day yesterday fit the occasion. But the result was a kind of Mass rarely seen in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Preceding Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua down the aisle of St. Elizabeth Chapel in Bensalem was Sister Catherine Joseph, who waved a feather to spread incense from a Pueblo Indian bowl. The penitential rite was a Blessing of the Four Directions, with Bevilacqua informing about 500 worshipers that east - the first direction for all to face -was toward the crucifix.
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