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NEWS
July 31, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathryn "Brooke" Baxter, 32, formerly of New Hope, a student at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, died Sunday in a bus accident in Tanzania. Ms. Baxter was in Africa for the summer as a volunteer for the Lwala Community Alliance in Kenya, working with pregnant women infected with HIV and malaria. She was commissioned as an Army lieutenant last summer, and had completed her first year of medical school on an Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, Special to The Inquirer
On a typical day in Nairobi, Kenya, this summer, La Tanya Frazier rose at 6:30 a.m. to make breakfast, and clean a bathroom and a lecture hall. The Deptford woman was one of 21 American college students who spent a month in Kenya under a program sponsored by the School for Field Studies, a Beverly, Mass., institution that offers college-age students an opportunity to get hands-on experience in other cultures. After their camp-maintenance chores, the students attended lectures on ecology, wildlife management, biology or statistics.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Cheryl Squadrito, Special to The Inquirer
In December, when most college students were home with their families celebrating the holidays, Swarthmore senior James Wallace traveled to Kenya to jump-start a nonprofit organization to help disadvantaged children attend school. Wallace, 22, left just days before Christmas for Kibera, a shantytown on the outskirts of Nairobi, to commence "Project Uniform. " His hope was to create a self-sustaining unit to provide school uniforms for children whose families could not afford to buy them.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rumpled 10-shilling notes poked from the fist of Jackson Njane. His pockets bulged with coins. With fares paid up, his "Nameless Tee" commuter service was ready to roll. On board Njane's matatu - a multicolored minibus - were 38 passengers crammed into a space designed for 24. There also were baskets of vegetables, a squawling baby, a live chicken and several heavy bags of cornmeal. The Nameless Tee, belching diesel exhaust, lurched away from a matatu stop along Moi Avenue in downtown Nairobi.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Got milk? Pass the butter? Not in Kenya, where both of those staples are increasingly scarce because a drought-induced dairy shortage is wreaking havoc on the milk, butter, and yogurt shelves. Grocery store owners, restaurant managers, and customers are annoyed and frustrated that an item as basic as butter is almost impossible to find in what is frequently billed as East Africa's largest economy. Farmers are producing only 30 percent of the country's needs, causing milk prices to shoot up in recent weeks by nearly a third.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
Opposition leaders attempting to hold a banned pro-democracy rally in Kenya were arrested yesterday, and afterward, security forces used tear gas and clubs to disperse thousands of protesters. A line of baton-wielding security police moved down Landhies Road in Nairobi, while in a muddy hollow at the edge of nearby Kamukunji Grounds, thousands of people waved leafy branches in the air and chanted for democracy. A lone military helicopter hovered in the cloud-dark air while another line of troops pushed a portion of the crowd onto the road and around a nearby corner.
NEWS
August 17, 2005 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's back to Africa for good-hearted movie star Angelina Jolie, this time accompanied by economist Jeffrey Sachs. People.com reports that Jolie, known for her ferocity on screen and her humanity off, will head to Sauri, a remote group of villages in western Kenya with Sachs, a special adviser to U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan and director of Columbia University's Earth Institute. They will be part of a U.N. team working with mothers, children, teachers, health workers and village elders to fight poverty, hunger and disease.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
One summer day in 1908, an English settler named Cecil Hoey was sitting on a hill watching three lions at play. In the distance, he saw what appeared to be a column of white smoke. Hoey grabbed his binoculars and looked again. It was a line of ox-drawn wagons covered with a dirty white cloth. The Boers had come to Kenya. A half-century later, thousands of Afrikaners from South Africa were farming wheat in the rich highlands of western Kenya. They had cleared the pine forests and founded the frontier town of Eldoret, also known as Little South Africa.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
HORRIFIC SCENES from a killer drought in the African valley where he was raised inspired Elijah Korich to become a champion for life. Korich, 64, is the founder and quiet force of nature behind Keiyo Soy Ministries, a faith-based organization that pulls resources from congregations in and around the city in support of its guiding principle: To improve the quality of life in western Kenya, especially through clean water. This morning, Korich will hold his Walk for Water, a 5K race on the Schuylkill River Trail, now in its sixth year, which serves as the annual linchpin in his fundraising efforts.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Lucy and Herman Bigham's home on a tidy West Philadelphia block is more than 7,400 miles from the litter that has both bothered and inspired them. Inspired them, that is, to start a small business with anything but a small agenda. They are out to turn plastic shopping bags in her native Kenya into a valuable commodity and elevate the fortunes of impoverished women there. Of course, they also hope it leads to profit - which their backers here think is doable. After all, that's part of the goal of social enterprise: to make money to do more good.
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NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
HORRIFIC SCENES from a killer drought in the African valley where he was raised inspired Elijah Korich to become a champion for life. Korich, 64, is the founder and quiet force of nature behind Keiyo Soy Ministries, a faith-based organization that pulls resources from congregations in and around the city in support of its guiding principle: To improve the quality of life in western Kenya, especially through clean water. This morning, Korich will hold his Walk for Water, a 5K race on the Schuylkill River Trail, now in its sixth year, which serves as the annual linchpin in his fundraising efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child of black nationalists in West Philadelphia, Asali Solomon suffered through her share of bizarre public-library Kwanzaa celebrations. Along with Thanksgiving, she got Umoja Karamu. It made her an outsider at Henry C. Lea School, and it didn't help her social standing when she transferred to the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, either. Everyone's childhood has its own particular angst, but Solomon's, at least, provided inspiration for her debut novel, Disgruntled . It was released in February by Farrar Straus Giroux, and she'll read from it on Thursday at 7 p.m. at the University of the Arts' Connelly Auditorium (211 S. Broad St., Philadelphia)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2014
CONTRARY to popular belief and the latest celebrity magazine, aging is not a disease. While many people think that they can outrun the aging process, I think a far better choice is to embrace it with grace and wisdom. Aging, much like investing, benefits best from an early start. The earlier you begin planning how you age, the greater your potential for a good return on investment. Obviously, it is most important to take advantage in your youth. Making the conscious decision to eat healthfully and exercise daily while you're young will give your fitness and health a good foundation for the future.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
IN HIS makeshift shop, set up for one day at 24th Street and Grays Ferry Avenue, William Macharia grazed his hand over four plastic baskets that held goods he offered for sale: Dozens of bracelets, made of cow's horns, purchased by Macharia from artisan women in Kenya. "Nothing goes to waste," he said, referring to the natural resources of his home country. Above the baskets dangled mobiles with zebras and elephants made of banana leaves galloping in the hot June sun. Alongside them were traditional African necklaces with a red, white and blue-beaded square - a depiction of the American flag - dangling at each end. Macharia, 37, of Laurel, Md., in Philly for the 37th Odunde Festival yesterday, said that Africans make use of what they're given.
SPORTS
May 4, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Chirchir's goal for Sunday's Broad Street Run doesn't involve a time, just a place. "I need to run to win," Chirchir said Friday over the phone. This is no idle thought. Chirchir missed victory on Broad Street by eight seconds last year, but the native of Kenya, now living in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J., has a slew of first-place trophies for races at all sorts of distances. "It's a nice course, well defined," Chirchir said of Broad Street. "You're not getting tired when you run. " Remember, the 40,000 runners filling Broad Street will be behind Chirchir.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
Actress seeks to save elephants NAIROBI, Kenya - Chinese actress Li Bingbing is in Kenya to bring attention to the growing problem of elephants slaughtered for the international ivory trade. Bingbing on Tuesday urged governments and consumers to combat the illegal wildlife trade. She told a news conference that Africa's poaching crisis raises major concerns about the survival of elephants and rhinos in Kenya. She noted that such deaths are linked to organized crime and the funding of armed militias.
FOOD
April 26, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
It was at the height of the mango season in west Kenya that Phil Hughes saw a way to bend the future. He was a Peace Corps volunteer at the time, 10 years ago. And the mangoes were, well, awesome - creamily lush and sweet, a variety called Ngowe, indigenous to Zanzibar, reddish-yellow. They were beautiful things. Hughes is not an animated speaker. But over a salad at the Reading Terminal Market one recent afternoon, he was getting worked up recalling his days in Africa. "Most of the year you can't get mangoes.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The distance between Peach Bottom, Pa., and Wajir, Kenya, is 7,800 miles. That also happens to be the distance of Karl Frey's life trajectory, which has arced from growing up Mennonite on his family's Lancaster County dairy farm to helping improve children's health in a drought-stricken area of eastern Africa. Don't even bother asking Frey if he's got milk - the answer will be yes. "I did drink a lot of milk when I was growing up," said Frey, 50. "It is the best thing out there in terms of nutrients, right?"
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Lucy and Herman Bigham's home on a tidy West Philadelphia block is more than 7,400 miles from the litter that has both bothered and inspired them. Inspired them, that is, to start a small business with anything but a small agenda. They are out to turn plastic shopping bags in her native Kenya into a valuable commodity and elevate the fortunes of impoverished women there. Of course, they also hope it leads to profit - which their backers here think is doable. After all, that's part of the goal of social enterprise: to make money to do more good.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Tom Odula, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Hundreds of people fearing a government backlash over the killing of at least 32 police officers are fleeing their homes in northwestern Kenya as the military prepares to help police pursue the bandits who carried out the attack, officials said Tuesday. Police Commissioner Mathew Iteere said a "serious" operation has begun to find those responsible for the deaths of the officers over the weekend. "We cannot allow such things to happen. I think they were testing the waters, and in due cause they will know the depth of the river," he said.
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