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FOOD
February 4, 1987 | By LUCY BARAJIKIAN, Los Angeles Daily News
Popcorn is an American institution. Bagfuls in hand, spectators find that circus elephants perform better and athletes compete harder. Moviegoers know that without it, even Robert Redford goes into a decline on the screen. Whenever it's served, you can count the smiles. What is popcorn's special appeal? When pressed, popcorn crazies explain their addiction in a gradual progression of reasons: Popcorn is visually appealing, popping into fluffy, tender bursts. It has a tantalizing crunch and aroma.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
WE'VE PUT men on the moon but have yet to come up with a perfect corn de-kerneler, one that cleans a freshly shucked cob without shooting kernels all over the kitchen. Sure, there are at least a dozen clever implements (variously called strippers, kernelers, zippers, cutters and peelers) designed to do the job. None seem to work as well as a sharp knife and steady hand. And that has its own problems: Holding that cob upright and still while cutting off the kernels can be a challenge.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1989 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If you have recently been accosted by a person dressed up as a huge popcorn bag, you may be interested to learn you've been part of a test to determine whether a brand of pre-popped popcorn called "Smartfood" has any appeal outside its native New England. The usual way to "test-market" a product is to put it out on the shelf in a few key cities to see if anybody buys it. Smartfood Inc. has done that in the Philadelphia and Jersey shore areas but, just to help the test along, it also has been giving out free samples.
NEWS
February 20, 1995 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cold? Go burn corn. Some folks, who don't mind burning food, do. How? Well, you don't go down to the supermarket, buy cans of succotash and toss them into the fireplace. You buy a stove, a strange sort of stove, a corn-burning stove. You buy bushels of kernels that farmers feed to cattle. You pour kernels into a stove-top container. And let a rotating screw feed the kernels into the belly of the stove. Sounds like a flashback to the environmentally aware 1970s.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 6 servings 1 tablespoon fresh    lemon juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 teaspooon sugar 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground    pepper 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 cups torn kale leaves 2 cups torn Swiss chard leaves 4 teaspoons unsalted pumpkin       seed kernels 1/4 cup sliced green onions 1 ounce shaved fresh pecorino    Romano cheese    (about 1/4 cup) 1. Combine first five ingredients, stirring until sugar dissolves.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | By Linda K. Harris Do you have a question for the Kids' Talk column about your favorite sports figure, TV star or cartoon character? Is there something you'd like to know about a current event, a famous person, an exotic animal or another part of the world? Feel free to ask us about anything that's on your mind. Send in your question. We'll try to answer it. Write: Kids' Talk, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Box 8380, Philadelphia 19101
Q AND A Question - What is the most valuable jewelry? - Connie Carlamere, Mansion Avenue School, Audubon, N.J. Answer - Diamonds! In November, Sotheby's in Geneva, Switzerland, auctioned off a flawless pear-shaped diamond that weighed 101.8 carats. It sold for $12.7 million. It was the highest price ever paid for a jewel at auction. A man named Robert Mouawada bought it and named it the Mouawada Splendor. The British crown jewels include the Star of Africa, a 530.2-carat diamond.
FOOD
July 6, 1994 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
A creamy white-gold ear of freshly picked corn, shining with butter, defines summer for people in our region. Perhaps because it is available all summer long, we tend to take for granted the abundance of this all-American delicacy. Sweet corn may be common in the United States, but it is still exotic to most of the world. Three-star French chefs have recently discovered a "new" ingredient - freshly harvested sweet corn. Chinese restaurants add canned baby corn with abandon to stir-fries, and make soup with canned creamed corn.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY JUDY HEVRDEJS, McClatchy News Service
INDULGE your appetite for sweet corn by shopping farmers markets, roadside stands and local grocers for freshly picked ears, then crunching your way around cob after cob after cob. While a rainy spring hampered planting, the corn harvest began in Lancaster County the third week of June, according to the Pennsylvania Vegetable Marketing & Research Program, in Harrisburg. Across the Delaware, New Jersey's Department of Agriculture said record-breaking warm spring weather brought in the corn (and tomatoes)
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A sticky, decade-long tax tussle with a honey-maker has ended with an oh- so-sweet victory for Pennsylvania. The state Supreme Court ruled 6-1 late Wednesday that Stewart Honeybee Products Inc. should not be granted an exemption given manufacturers from paying the state's capital stock tax, which is assessed on businesses as measured by their capitalized net income and net worth. The reason: Processing raw honey for human consumption is like popping corn to make popcorn. It's different from, say, mixing pressurized air and water to make snow.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
You can buy it by the bag, the jar or even frozen in a pouch, and now a few farmers are showing people another way to buy popcorn - on the cob. "They think it's for decoration," said Gene Wilcox, who grows about an acre of popcorn to sell at his family-owned Wilcox Roadside Market in Douglass Township near Boyertown. Wilcox, 65, said he has to explain to a lot of people that popcorn does not come from a factory. Most of the 10.8 billion quarts of popcorn consumed by Americans last year were grown in the Midwest, said a spokeswoman for the Popcorn Institute, in Chicago, and Wilcox is among only a handful of farmers who grow Pennsylvania popcorn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2014 | BY DEBORAH WOODELL, Daily News Staff Writer woodeld@phillynews.com
GREAT NEWS for vintage Korn fans - as well as fans of vintage Korn: When the band stops at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center tonight in support of headliner Slipknot on the "Prepare for Hell Tour," expect a lot of the older songs from the catalog, said bass player Reggie Arvizu, known to fans as "Fieldy. " "On this leg, we're only doing two new songs from 'The Paradigm Shift,' " Fieldy said in a recent telephone interview, referring to the band's 11th studio album, released in late 2013, on Prospect Park Records.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
WE'VE PUT men on the moon but have yet to come up with a perfect corn de-kerneler, one that cleans a freshly shucked cob without shooting kernels all over the kitchen. Sure, there are at least a dozen clever implements (variously called strippers, kernelers, zippers, cutters and peelers) designed to do the job. None seem to work as well as a sharp knife and steady hand. And that has its own problems: Holding that cob upright and still while cutting off the kernels can be a challenge.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY JUDY HEVRDEJS, McClatchy News Service
INDULGE your appetite for sweet corn by shopping farmers markets, roadside stands and local grocers for freshly picked ears, then crunching your way around cob after cob after cob. While a rainy spring hampered planting, the corn harvest began in Lancaster County the third week of June, according to the Pennsylvania Vegetable Marketing & Research Program, in Harrisburg. Across the Delaware, New Jersey's Department of Agriculture said record-breaking warm spring weather brought in the corn (and tomatoes)
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 6 servings 1 tablespoon fresh    lemon juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 teaspooon sugar 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground    pepper 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 cups torn kale leaves 2 cups torn Swiss chard leaves 4 teaspoons unsalted pumpkin       seed kernels 1/4 cup sliced green onions 1 ounce shaved fresh pecorino    Romano cheese    (about 1/4 cup) 1. Combine first five ingredients, stirring until sugar dissolves.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
THE MOVIE THEATER industry made a scene - to put it mildly - when it looked as if the U.S. Food and Drug Administration might make theaters list the calorie counts in the tubs of popcorn they sell at exorbitant prices. As part of the Affordable Care Act, establishments with more than 20 locations - restaurants, convenience stores, groceries, even vending machines - will have to tell consumers the calorie counts of what they are buying. The sticker shock may persuade Americans to buy healthier foods, and restaurants to offer better choices.
NEWS
January 15, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joanne Sharpless Cruse's family has grown corn on its Chester County farm for 112 years. This year, it rained too much at harvest time, but she declared the crop excellent anyway. "Big ears," she says. "Just huge ears. " At last week's Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg, 10 of her best ears, meticulously cleaned with a toothbrush, lay in a golden row like nuggets of sunshine. As judge Paul Craig, of the Penn State extension service, measured the ears for uniformity and rubbed his thumb along the plump kernels, he smiled.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The stony, hillside fields of Thomas Stickle's farm here in Western Pennsylvania bear an unusual crop: a tall grass meant to feed not animals, but cars. Stickle, who once farmed more than 1,000 acres of corn and other row crops, and government scientists are studying how to get the most out of his switchgrass as a renewable fuel - while creating wildlife habitat and conserving soil. "I'm trying to come up with the appropriate balance," said Stickle, who tracks the impact of harvesting his 200 acres of perennial switchgrass - grown without fertilizer and pesticides - at different times of the year and at various intervals.
SPORTS
June 25, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last of three articles. The "Field of Dreams" diamond, its outfield walled in by waist-high corn, came into view just as their bus lumbered over a rural hill on Lansing Road yesterday afternoon. A daylong rain had only recently yielded to sunshine, and the familiar ball field's wet grass sparkled like crystal. Surrounded by farm-dotted hills, it was the kind of pastoral landscape that could take a baseball purist's breath away. So how, after a tedious six-hour bus ride from Omaha, did the 15 citified 13-year-olds on the barnstorming Philadelphia Stars react to this bucolic beauty?
FOOD
June 28, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Fourth of July is meaningful in many ways. And one of those ways, when planning the annual holiday cookout, has long been the first taste of fresh-picked, locally grown corn on the cob. In our circle of friends, it is Judy who for 20-some years has been (and likely forever will be) in charge of picking up the two dozen to three dozen ears of corn we relish from the farm near her home in the western suburbs. For us city types, her contribution to the annual everybody-brings-a-dish cookout is as important as the burgers or the fireworks.
FOOD
September 30, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Blue patooties & martinis Congrats to Chef Anthony Arbeeny for his clever potato bar menu at the Park Hyatt Philadelphia at the Bellevue. High atop the hotel in the gorgeous, domed Ethel Barrymore Room on the 19th floor, you can sip martinis and nibble on the most innovative late-night nosh. When? Fridays and Saturdays, from 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. What, exactly? Whipped Peruvian blue potatoes, served in martini glasses with your choice of topping - salmon caviar, Tobiko caviar, truffles in oil, smoked salmon, creme fraiche, red onion, chives or tomatoes - for a reasonable $6 per glass.
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