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Kerosene

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NEWS
December 29, 1986 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Julia DeLuca was outside her house in Tacony about noon yesterday, washing down the steps after her next-door neighbor had thrown kerosene over another man in a dispute, when the man returned. "All I saw was this rifle pointing out the car window, and then all these shots," DeLuca recalled. The assailant, whom police were looking for last night, fired 12 shots through the front window of the house on Hegerman Street near Disston. Police said the house is occupied by Robert Finch, 29, Eileen Synakowski, 21, and their 11-month-old child.
NEWS
January 10, 1986 | By LESLIE SCISM, Daily News Staff Writer
Dressed in a bathrobe and perched in her doorway across the street, Geraldine Gray watched the flames as they licked the windows of 1403 S. 20th St. on New Year's Day. Within minutes, two of her neighbors were dead and three others were injured. When word spread up and down the street of two-story rowhouses that improper use of a kerosene heater was to blame, Gray's reaction was immediate. "I decided right then and there, they can take mine out," she said last week. "When someone I knew died, that's it. I'm scared of it now. " Down the street, Charlotte Hill felt differently.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Energy Solutions announced Thursday it is recalling a potentially unsafe batch of kerosene that got into the market that could cause fires in space heaters. PES said it was conducting a "voluntary recall" of kerosene sold between Dec. 10 and Dec. 18 because it could ignite and "create a potential safety hazard. " The company operates the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia. As much as 2,000 gallons of the volatile fuel were sold through nine Pennsylvania and New Jersey outlets, including stations in West Philadelphia, Quakertown and Burlington, said Philip L. Rinaldi, the chief executive of PES. The recall was initiated after a customer complained that the fuel did not smell right.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Paul Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Cold weather and kerosene heaters go together for many area residents, but fire officials wish they wouldn't. "The biggest problem with kerosene heaters is that people don't know how to handle them safely," said Bart Mayes, fire prevention official for Collingdale Fire Co. No. 2. Mayes said that kerosene heaters are designed to supplement a home's primary heating system, but that many people use them as the primary heat source. Mayes said any heating source that burns hydrocarbon fuel releases toxic gases.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | By Kevin McKinney, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Customers of a West Chester service station who unknowingly purchased a potentially explosive mixture of gasoline and kerosene over the weekend were being advised yesterday against using the fuel. More than 200 gallons of the fuel mix were sold by the Amoco station at the White Glove Car Wash on Market Street in West Chester Saturday morning, company officials said. "Our main concern is the safety of the people," said Bill Wolfe, a regional manager for White Glove. "Luckily, we haven't had any serious problems.
NEWS
April 5, 1986 | By Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County man narrowly escaped injury last night when gasoline he bought thinking it was kerosene burst into flames as he tried to pour it into a lit heater in his home, police and fire officials said. As a result, police last night warned anyone who has bought kerosene since Wednesday at the 7-Eleven Store at Bethlehem and Butler Pikes in Ambler Borough not to use the fuel. Wissahickon Fire Chief Jesse Hayden said the mistake occurred when a part- time clerk returned to work after an absence and was not told that a self- service pump used to dispense kerosene had been converted to gasoline on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plymouth Fire Marshal Jack Fessler says he would like to stop residents from making the potentially deadly mistake of pouring gasoline into a kerosene heater. "The only way you can tell the difference between gasoline and kerosene is by odor," Fessler said. "Mr. Joe Suburban out there doesn't know the difference. " Bud Carlson, Cheltenham's assistant fire marshal, recalled that last winter, Cheltenham police had to use loudspeakers to warn residents that a local gasoline station had sold kerosene tainted with gasoline.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By Laurie Merrill, Special to The Inquirer
An Ambler resident who mistakenly purchased gasoline for his kerosene heater escaped uninjured from his burning three-story home Friday evening after the gasoline ignited. Charles Sanders, 32, of the first block of North Street, told Ambler police that he purchased $4.78 of what he thought was kerosene at the 7-Eleven store at Butler and Bethlehem Pikes about 6:45 p.m. Friday. About a half hour later, Sanders poured the fluid into a kerosene heater that was operating in his second-floor bedroom.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) announced Thursday that it was recalling a potentially unsafe batch of kerosene that got into the market that could cause fires in space heaters. PES said it was conducting a "voluntary recall" of kerosene sold between Dec. 10 and Tuesday because it could ignite and "create a potential safety hazard. " The company operates the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia. As much as 2,000 gallons of the volatile fuel were sold through nine Pennsylvania and New Jersey outlets, including stations in West Philadelphia, Quakertown, and Burlington, said Philip L. Rinaldi, chief executive of PES. The recall was initiated after a customer complained that the fuel did not smell right.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | By William W. Sutton Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council yesterday unanimously approved a new program to provide up to $250,000 worth of free kerosene for low- and moderate-income families who have exhausted their emergency government allocations for heating oil. Councilman John F. Street, sponsor of the measure, said yesterday that he did not know how soon the program would be implemented. Street introduced the measure two weeks ago, saying he had received numerous telephone calls from people who said they were without heat.
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NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) announced Thursday that it was recalling a potentially unsafe batch of kerosene that got into the market that could cause fires in space heaters. PES said it was conducting a "voluntary recall" of kerosene sold between Dec. 10 and Tuesday because it could ignite and "create a potential safety hazard. " The company operates the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia. As much as 2,000 gallons of the volatile fuel were sold through nine Pennsylvania and New Jersey outlets, including stations in West Philadelphia, Quakertown, and Burlington, said Philip L. Rinaldi, chief executive of PES. The recall was initiated after a customer complained that the fuel did not smell right.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Energy Solutions announced Thursday it is recalling a potentially unsafe batch of kerosene that got into the market that could cause fires in space heaters. PES said it was conducting a "voluntary recall" of kerosene sold between Dec. 10 and Dec. 18 because it could ignite and "create a potential safety hazard. " The company operates the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia. As much as 2,000 gallons of the volatile fuel were sold through nine Pennsylvania and New Jersey outlets, including stations in West Philadelphia, Quakertown and Burlington, said Philip L. Rinaldi, the chief executive of PES. The recall was initiated after a customer complained that the fuel did not smell right.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES), operators of the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia, announced Thursday a recall of some potentially unsafe kerosene sold through nine Pennsylvania and New Jersey outlets, including stations in West Philadelphia, Quakertown and Burlington. PES said it was conducting a "voluntary recall" of kerosene sold between Dec. 10 and Dec. 18 because it "could create a potential safety hazard due to a low ignition temperature, which may cause fires in space heaters or other equipment.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
With little fanfare, the U.S. Department of Energy enacted a rule last year that will require all new furnaces installed in 30 Northern states including Pennsylvania and New Jersey to be high-efficiency models. Who would object to such a noble effort to conserve energy? Philadelphia Gas Works, for one. The city-owned utility is among several parties that have challenged the Energy Department's rule, saying that some homeowners cannot afford to install costly high-efficiency heating systems and will opt for cheaper electric or kerosene heaters.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware man died early this morning in a double crash involving three trucks on the New Jersey Turnpike, according to New Jersey state police. All three northbound lanes were opened late this morning, after crews repaired guardrail and dealt with 1,000 gallons of kerosene that spilled into a drain, according to turnpike spokesman Joe Orlando. The highway was shut down for eight hours this morning, between Exit 4 in Mount Laurel and Exit 7A in Robbinsville. Two lanes were reopened at about 9 a.m., the third about 11 a.m., Orlando said.
NEWS
December 30, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A fatal error of pouring gasoline instead of kerosene into a heater caused the blaze that killed seven in a Southwest Philadelphia house fire on Friday, Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said yesterday. Ayers said a report from the fire marshal confirmed what firefighters at the scene had suspected. "There was an instant fire," Ayers said. "Those folks went from looking at television to instant peril. . . . It was pandemonium all of a sudden. " The fire started at 10:47 p.m. Friday and required 53 firefighters to contain in 36 minutes.
NEWS
December 29, 2008 | By Larry King and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
City Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said yesterday the removal of a basement stairway that might have enabled the escape of seven people killed in a fire late Friday in Southwest Philadelphia did not appear to be a code violation. Though the official cause of the fire has not been announced, it appears a mishandled kerosene heater set off an inferno that trapped the seven victims, who could not flee out the finished basement's single back door. A year-old child was the only one found still alive, but he died within an hour at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"Cut it out!" Backstage at the PNC Bank Arts Center, Miranda Lambert is laying down the law. As usual, the object of her wrath - in this case, Delilah, the "terrier-slash-whatever mix" who's yipping at a visitor to the country starlet's tour bus - falls meekly into line. That's one smart doggie. For if the mutt has been listening closely to her master's work - like the 2005 hit CD debut Kerosene, and its follow-up, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, which topped the country charts on its release in May - she's learned an unmistakable lesson: Miranda Lambert don't take no mess.
NEWS
December 28, 2005 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A North Philadelphia man died early yesterday morning after his rowhouse erupted in flames by a fire possibly caused by a kerosene heater, authorities said. Alexander Screen, 35, of 1224 W. Harold St., was found dead in his home at 1:23 a.m. after firefighters encountered heavy fire in the two-story dwelling, authorities said. He is the 53d person to die in a fire this year. At least two earlier deaths this season were related to space heaters. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Medical Examiner's Office, said an autopsy shows that Screen died of smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning.
NEWS
December 14, 2005 | By Andrew Rudin
So, cold weather is here - daily temperatures from the teens to the 30s - and prices for oil and natural gas are much higher than last year. How do you survive if you don't want to pay high fuel bills or move in with Aunt Mary and Uncle John to save money? Here are some dos and don'ts: Don't heat rooms with unvented kerosene heaters, gas ovens or gas burners, or gas or charcoal barbecue grills. They use up oxygen and create deadly carbon monoxide. Don't use portable electric heaters.
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