CollectionsKeyboards
IN THE NEWS

Keyboards

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
There were so many better ways to spend an evening and $19.75 than at the sold-out Jars of Clay show at the Electric Factory on Sunday. The Christian pop band, which moved more than a million copies of its self-titled debut last year, put on one of the dullest shows this reviewer has ever attended. It wasn't all the band's fault - the sound mix and the cavernous concrete venue did thwart musical nuance. But much of the blame goes to the Nashville quartet. Every song was a mid-tempo rocker with little chordal range.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Keyboard player and composer Dexter Wansel likes to drop the jazz word a lot, but his Friday night show at the new Blue Moon Jazz Club lacked any linear connection with the music of Bird, Diz and 'Trane. Wansel serves up music that's light and easy. A little funk for the swinging bar crowd. Some melody for people holding hands. A saccharine mellowness that has more to do with WJAZ radio than the legendary A Train. Wansel held forth Friday night with Universe - six other musicians, including two drummers, a second keyboard and a guitarist - in the city's newest jazz room with its long mirrored wall and cool blue light.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trying to sell an American-made consumer-electronics product in the land of Sony, Toshiba, Yamaha and Panasonic would seem to be an exercise in futility. Especially when Japan is the world leader in producing the item in question. Double especially at a time when many American manufacturers complain that the Japanese stubbornly resist buying from them. So what makes Ensoniq Corp. think it can sell its made-in-Malvern electronic keyboards in Japan? Because its musical instruments are aimed at the youth market, which marketing director Robin Weber says isn't the same as the rest of Japan.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sixth grader Yemi Bedu raced into the library and quickly jumped into his assigned chair. Eyes focused on the electronic box before him, his fingertips began to move. No sooner than the computer was booted up, Yemi launched into a test that emphasized the a, s, l and k keys. His tally - 20 words per minute with two errors. "That's my average," a straight-faced Yemi said without turning an eye. "It was hard when I first started because I made a lot of errors," but after nine sessions, he said, he is really learning his way around a keyboard.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Harris Neifield can't spell his last name yet, but he's a whiz with numbers. He knew, for instance, that when groups at six tables in his kindergarten classroom each had 100 pennies, that made 600 in all. "I already knew how to count, because sometimes I count my money at home," said the fast-talking 5-year-old. "Sometimes I even make mistakes. " Harris probably couldn't have done the multiplication on paper, but when it was right there in front of him - hey, it was easy.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the last four years, says Thomas Hunter, 39, the operator of a Bensalem musical instrument store, he has waited out the slumping economy for a good Christmas season. So when he heard predictions of an upsurge in business this holiday season, he stocked the warehouse of his Philadelphia Music Co. at 2636 Bristol Pike with hundreds of keyboards, guitars, saxophones and trumpets. He was ready for just about any customer. "If it made music, we had it," he said. And "had it" is the proper tense.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | By Dennis Romero, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moby may be one of pop's shyest sub-stars, a low-key guy known to check the tensile strength of his T-shirts before slipping one on. But he's the epitome of positiveness. On Wednesday night at the Trocadero, he encouraged the young, hyped crowd to "Drop a Beat" - the name of one of his songs - ostensibly in place of dropping acid or ecstasy. Given the level of adrenalin and tribal bass that flowed through the Troc, dropping beats might really be a surrogate for drugs. The former punk rocker - and descendant of Herman Melville - put on a one-man supershow by stepping away from his trio of sampling keyboards and dancing furiously.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1991 | JUANA ANDERSON/ DAILY NEWS
Looking almost like commuters dashing for a bus or train, three members of the Electronics Data Service team pound the pavement yesterday in the First Annual Veryfine Briefcase 4K Run, a 2 1/2-mile "fun run" in which participants were encouraged to sprint in their work attire. Breezing along with keyboards and computer terminals on Front Street are (from left) Mark Redmann, Lori Iseri and Cathy Wagner. Some 1,000 runners from the city's business community and government agencies took part.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
ON SATURDAY, Microsoft opens a pop-up-style specialty store at the King of Prussia Mall, offering a "curated selection" of Windows PCs and tablets, Surface PC/tablet hybrids, Xboxes, Kinect peripherals, games, software, mice, keyboards and more. Samsung is going the trendy, store-within-a-store route with Samsung Experience Shops inside Best Buy. starting this week at the stores on Bethlehem Pike in Montgomeryville and Roosevelt Boulevard in Northeast Philly. This Experience will expand in the next week or two to Best Buys around the region.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1998 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Somewhere along the line it was decided that serious composers weren't supposed to be entertaining and entertaining composers couldn't possibly be serious, and into the breach stepped Yanni. His sold-out concert Tuesday night at the CoreStates Center mixed classical pretense with pop candy, bongos with tuxedos. As in a classical concert, the orchestra took the stage first, then the soloists, then conductor Armen Anassian, and finally, the maned Greek. Ten of the 40 or so musicians formed Yanni's "band.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | CHICAGO TRIBUNE
SHOPPING FOR a piano can be incredibly overwhelming because the range of prices for a new one can be anywhere from $2,500 all the way up to $2 million. Add in used pianos, and the price range expands. There are also thousands of brands, and if you don't know what to listen for, you may think every piano (regardless of price and brand) sounds the same. "It's kind of like shopping for anything," said Pierre Julia, owner of Pierre's Fine Pianos, based in Los Angeles. "The range of quality goes from made-in-China to hand-built in Europe.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary V. Babin, 82, whose gift for organ and piano playing launched a career that spanned close to 70 years, died Saturday, June 15, at her home in Springfield, Delaware County. The former Mary Volkert grew up in Yeadon but spent most of her adult life as a resident of Havertown. Her grandmother taught her to play piano at a young age, and by the time she was 11, she was the full-time organist at the borough's St. Louis Catholic Church. It was the beginning of a lifelong love of music and the church, and she remained a professional organist for the next 68 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chuck Leavell is feeling great. Tuesday's Rolling Stones concert was so fine. Friday's is coming up. And Leavell, the band's keyboard player for 31 years, is loving it all. But for now, a brief breather on a sunny afternoon, he's talking trees. That's his other life, his twin passion. He has a 2,500-acre Georgia forest plantation near Macon, and he has become a staunch advocate for the idea that using the nation's trees is what will save them. It will help people recognize their value.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
ON SATURDAY, Microsoft opens a pop-up-style specialty store at the King of Prussia Mall, offering a "curated selection" of Windows PCs and tablets, Surface PC/tablet hybrids, Xboxes, Kinect peripherals, games, software, mice, keyboards and more. Samsung is going the trendy, store-within-a-store route with Samsung Experience Shops inside Best Buy. starting this week at the stores on Bethlehem Pike in Montgomeryville and Roosevelt Boulevard in Northeast Philly. This Experience will expand in the next week or two to Best Buys around the region.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The great thing about Rossini's Petite Messe Solennelle , an evening-length work for chorus, vocal soloists, and keyboards, is that nearly every adjective, from the silly to the sublime, is somewhere supported by music. Choral Arts of Philadelphia gave this 1863 piece an earnest, thoughtful effort Saturday at St. Mark's Church, the first of three local performances this season. It was a fearlessly clear guided tour of Petite Messe 's highs and lows - which sometimes were heard simultaneously.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Seldom do audiences rebel with their checkbooks. The third of pianist Jeffrey Siegel's three-times-a-year Keyboard Conversations at the Kimmel Center had just concluded in April when the announcement was made from the stage: Presenting the series was no longer affordable amid recession-era cutbacks - even popular attractions often lose money - so this concert would be Siegel's last at the Kimmel. "I got a couple boos," said Kimmel Center chief executive Anne Ewers, who made the announcement.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer
AN ELECTRONIC piano keyboard was stolen from a Southwest Philadelphia church a few days ago, and church members are hoping the community can help them find it. "We're a poor church, but when it comes to God's music, we try to do the best," the Rev. Paul "Earthquake" Moore, an associate minister of the New Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church, at 70th Street and Woodland Avenue, said Sunday. He described the keyboard as "very expensive. " Moore, a well-known anti-violence activist, said his brother, Robert Moore, a maintenance man for the church, discovered the theft on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
As Julia Holter crafted Tragedy, a song cycle based on Euripides' play Hippolytus that came out in August, she also worked on songs that didn't fit the ancient Greek narrative. These disparate pieces, built on Holter's stately and sprightly keyboards and layered vocals, became Ekstasis, one of the most fascinating albums thus far this year. Holter has an academic background - she studied electronic composition at California Institute of the Arts, where she wrote songs based on algorithms and other formalist concepts.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2012
In the eternal quest for a better external keyboard to make typing on smartphones and tablets easier, Verbatim has debuted a battery-powered wireless Bluetooth folding keyboard, with big, responsive keys on a solid plastic base, that measures just 6-by-4-by-3/4 inches thick when folded. The keyboard pairs easily with most iPhones and iPads, as well as with many Android and some BlackBerry devices. It even has a little pullout stand that should work with most phones, and shortcut keys for the iPhone and iPad.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
The Man Man men have been doing their chaotic, percussive, theatrical thing in Philly for long enough now to risk self-parody, but Saturday's sold-out homecoming show at Union Transfer was pure adrenaline rush. Over the course of four albums since 2004, Man Man has honed its style, becoming incrementally more melodic and more inclined to anchor a song in a chant or a hook, although that hook is often a barbed shout. "Mister Dagger meet Mister Back, inseparable, together at last," Ryan Kattner (aka Honus Honus)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|