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NEWS
November 6, 2003
ON SEPT. 9, 1997, I received a life saving kidney transplant at Thomas Jefferson Hospital from my brother Joe, saving my life. When I was first told I would need a transplant, I presented the situation to him. Without a blink of an eye, he agreed. The exams building up to the transplant are torture in themselves, and the donor goes through much pain in extracting the kidney. They had to remove two of Joe's ribs to get the kidney out. There was a three-month recovery before he was able to go back to work.
SPORTS
November 10, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Miami Dolphins wide receiver Cris Carter was hospitalized yesterday with what was initially diagnosed as a kidney abnormality, ESPN.com reported yesterday. Carter will not play in tonight's game against the New York Jets and is out indefinitely, the Web site said. Doctors won't know the cause of Carter's symptoms until tests are complete. Carter, who began his career with the Eagles, ended a brief retirement and joined the Dolphins in October, signing a one-year contract.
SPORTS
April 24, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Seahawks safety Kenny Easley saw a physician in Seattle yesterday for a previously undetected kidney condition that is keeping him from joining the Phoenix Cardinals, but Easley's attorney said more tests and exams by specialists are needed before a diagnosis and treatment can be announced. "His mood is upbeat," said Leigh Steinberg, Easley's attorney, in Berkeley, Calif. Easley was examined Friday by Cardinals team physician Russell Chick, an orthopedic surgeon, and Morton Dubnow, an internist.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Helen H. Shen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Anne Peniazek decided to donate a kidney at age 65, the Narberth woman had bigger hopes than helping just one person. She and her surgeon James Lim of Lankenau Medical Center wanted to start a movement. Instead of arranging a typical kidney donation, Lim helped her start an open-ended kidney-donation chain, one of a small number in the United States. In December, Peniazek's kidney was given to Geoff Bowman of Philadelphia, who at age 32 had already had three transplants.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jane Smith, who teaches eighth-grade science, is about as "giving" as a person can be. Yesterday she said that, as soon as she saw him smile after the four-hour transplant surgery they shared, she felt great about donating a kidney to one of her students. The 43-year-old teacher and the student, Michaelo Carter, 15, are recovering at UNC Hospitals in Chapel Hill, N.C. Since she announced in August that she would donate the kidney, she had avoided publicity. But yesterday she appeared with the attending surgeon to urge others to become organ donors.
NEWS
April 27, 2001
Gloria Harris (cover story, April 17): I know what it is to need a transplant to live. I am a transplant recipient myself. Your brother, Barry Howell, is a lifetime criminal who belongs in jail for many years. Transplants follow the law, social and moral rules and regulations - and a waiting list. This transplant would be a travesty of justice. What about the people he victimized? Has he made restitutions? Many things need to be considered before a decision can be rendered.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Theresa Welsh, a Haddonfield pediatrician, agreed to donate her kidney to a stranger, to start a chain of kidney donations, she had one requirement: get the operation done with before her first grandchild arrived. The surgery was Oct. 22. She was back to work part time in two weeks, seeing her own patients. And she will spend Christmas Day with her new grandson, Evan, born Dec. 5. "I do feel perfectly fine," she said. Her right kidney has stepped up its performance beautifully, making up for the loss of her left.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many a son would give his right arm to have a relationship with his dad like 33-year-old Joe Berardoni Jr. has with his. After his wife died and he was left a single father, the elder Berardoni would skip out of work to catch his son's soccer and basketball games. They forged such a special bond that "young Joe" — who shares a quirky sense of humor with his father, if not his diminutive stature — didn't hesitate when his dad asked him more than a decade ago to work side by side, day after day, at Pun's Toys, his whimsical shop on Lancaster Avenue in Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
You're a healthy young business traveler who finds himself at a party where an attractive woman takes an interest. She feeds you booze and drugs nonstop. Finally, you pass out. You awaken naked in a bathtub filled with ice. On your chest, a message is written in lipstick: "Call 911 or you will die!" The 911 operator tells you to check your back. In the mirror, you see two nine-inch slits near the base of the spine. The operator tells you to get back in the tub immediately.
SPORTS
August 9, 1989 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Basketball official Joe DeMayo made his biggest call last week. Not one person booed, jeered or shouted complaints. No one needed the call - nor will appreciate it later - more than DeMayo's son, Michael, who turns 5 this Saturday. By then, Michael, who received a kidney from Joe on July 31, should be back in his Northeast Philly home from St. Christopher's Hospital. "We knew this was coming when Michael was 3 months old," said DeMayo, 40, who referees numerous college and high school games, including championships in both the Public and Catholic leagues.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Daniel D. Eun, For The Inquirer
For six years, 42-year-old Lawrence Valenzano of Shamong couldn't do the simplest things he had once taken for granted: He couldn't run around with his children, or ride his mountain bike. He couldn't even bend down to tie his own shoes. It all started after he had a serious complication from kidney stone surgery, a large area of scar tissue that blocked urine from passing through the ureter from his left kidney to his bladder. The recommended fix: major open surgery, with a significant risk of losing his kidney or developing additional complications.
NEWS
April 3, 2016
Peering through the scope, the surgeon could see that Kayley's problems went beyond a misformed vulva. Rather than emptying into the bladder, Kayley's ureters passed through the balloon-like organ and terminated in the urethra, the passage to the outside. The condition is known as ectopic ureter. Without the bladder's pressure and muscle control, urine trickled out. Kayley's frequent infections, likely the result of urine buildup in several spots, intensified the incontinence. Plus, the opening at the end of the left ureter was minuscule.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Like most of us, Kathleen Barrowclough, 70, was born with only two kidneys. So, she couldn't save both her brother and her sister, who each needed a kidney transplant to stay alive. "My brother said, 'I won't take your kidney, because Nancy is going to need it,' " Barrowclough recalled, and although the story is 20 years old, the retired nurse from Hockessin, Del., can't say it without a catch in the throat. "He refused," she said, and then bravely made a stab at a joke about needing Kleenex.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
More than 300 supporters of the National Kidney Foundation came out March 10 for the Kidney Ball, held at the Hyatt at the Bellevue in Philadelphia. Honored for their dedication to combating kidney disease were Joseph Cosgrove, president and CEO of Pentec Health, with the Leadership in Business Award; nephrologist Robert Benz of Lankenau Medical Center, with the Excellence in Care Award; volunteer Tina Wilson, with the Community Leadership Award; and Philadelphia native and rapper Freeway, with the Patient Advocacy Award.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Anna Okropiribce, 16, drinks from the water fountains at Northeast High School only when she's "desperate. " The water is warm and metallic-tasting. "It's pretty gross," she said. "Once, I filled up my water bottle, and the water wasn't clear. It was gray. I got scared. I was like, I don't know if I should drink this. " That's cause for concern, given that poor water intake is a likely factor in a startling phenomenon outlined in research published Thursday by a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia doctor.
NEWS
November 18, 2015
ISSUE | MEDICARE Help kidney patients Harold Brubaker's article on Medicare Advantage open enrollment ("Seniors shopping for private Medicare have many new choices," Nov. 10) might have noted that some 4,700 beneficiaries in the Philadelphia area are not permitted to choose private plans because they have kidney failure, also known as end-stage renal disease. This prohibition may have made sense three decades ago, when private Medicare plans were created, but today it constitutes discrimination, preventing kidney patients from enjoying the maximum out-of-pocket limits that apply in private plans but not in traditional fee-for-service Medicare.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
VINCENT MARGERA, of Chester County, the often-incomprehensible Uncle Don Vito from the MTV series "Viva La Bam" and "Jackass," died yesterday of liver and kidney failure, his sister-in-law said. He was 59. Margera, who was born in Chester and had been living in West Chester, had been in and out of Chester County Hospital since falling into a coma last month, April Margera told the Daily News . She is the mother of the series' star, Bam Margera. "He had emergency dialysis and he came out of it and was actually able to go home.
NEWS
September 29, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In more than four years on the waiting list for a kidney, Deborah Husmann had eight phone calls about a possible organ match. Each time, the kidney was a better fit for someone else, until - of all the weekends - Pope Francis was in town. And Husmann was close to an hour and a half away, camping in the middle of the Jersey Pinelands. No matter. She made it by ambulance with an escort from New Jersey and Pennsylvania state police, and was in good spirits Sunday, the day after her four-hour operation at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | BY CHRISSY RIVERA
TODAY, I WILL NOT need to stop at the cemetery to visit the grave of my little girl. Nor will I have to escort her to dialysis appointments, emotionally draining visits to the ER, or endure any long hospital stays. It was not long ago, however, when I feared those excursions would become a routine and I was terrified I'd eventually be spending a good deal of my time grieving for my daughter in a cemetery. But today, instead of walking into a quiet, lifeless house after work, I will enter a home full of love and be greeted by my precious child who was never supposed to live.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carrie Pappas was going to get married last weekend, but got a kidney instead. She was at BJ's that Friday buying rolls - she'd spent the last month cooking all the food herself - when the call came from the transplant team: Come! Now! She was actually a little sad. Tears welled in her eyes as she went home to tell Dan Hallock, the man she was supposed to marry the next day, that the wedding was off. This would be the second marriage for both. Pappas, 42, had her first child as a senior in high school and got married the first time in her brother's kitchen.
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