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Kidney Disease

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October 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Alonzo Mourning walked into the AmericanAirlines Arena conference room, grinning widely, looking healthy and happy. His facial expression and demeanor belied the news that followed. The Miami Heat announced yesterday that Mourning, the team's All-Star center and one of the NBA's top players, who just helped the United States win gold at the Olympics, will miss this season to concentrate on his battle with a kidney disease that eventually requires a transplant or dialysis in about half the documented cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I have two sons, 19 and 12. My younger boy has a rare form of kidney disease. His kidney function is now normal, but his doctor says that in the future he may need a new kidney. At that point, his brother would be high on the list for compatibility and availability. I, sadly, would not. How does one mention the possibility of being a donor to his older brother? Is it even fair to ask? If he doesn't offer, would I always resent it? Should we wait until there is a real need before asking?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
DEAR ABBY: I always knew high blood pressure ran in my family, but I never realized that it could cause kidney disease. Because I felt healthy, I hadn't worried about my "borderline" hypertension. Turns out, my kidneys were silently being damaged. I have since made lifestyle changes to control my blood pressure and prevent further damage. These include daily exercise and cutting back on salt, sweets and fast food. March is National Kidney Month, and March 14 is World Kidney Day. The National Kidney Foundation is urging Americans to learn their risk factors for kidney disease and to get their kidneys checked with a simple urine and blood test.
NEWS
August 2, 2010 | By Vabren L. Watts, Inquirer Staff Writer
African Americans are four times as likely to have kidney disease as Caucasians, and a recent study from Harvard University may explain why. Nephrologist Martin Pollak and his team found that a common genetic mutation of the APOL1 gene might be partly responsible for African Americans' susceptibility. The mutation likely arose due to natural selection because it protects against African sleeping sickness, Pollak wrote. Yet it also makes African Americans more vulnerable to kidney disease, according to the study released last month in the online issue of Science Magazine.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All this week, students at Jenkintown Elementary School will traipse two by two, often a little sheepishly, into nurse Suzanne Holland's office to give urine specimens. When the students are done, Holland will dip multi-colored paper strips into the cups to see what happens. The strips screen for urinary-tract infections, kidney disease and diabetes. If the colors change, it's a sign that something may be wrong. In the first two days of the screening program, Holland found only a few samples that deviated from the norm.
SPORTS
October 5, 2003 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alonzo Mourning has a new four-year contract, even though it wasn't that long ago that the newest New Jersey Net didn't know whether he would have a four-year lease on life. The $22.7 million deal is guaranteed, but little else in Mourning's life is. Mourning says he feels great, is talking confidently, and by all accounts has been his usual warrior-like self while participating for the last month in informal workouts with his new team before training camp began on Friday. Nobody, including Mourning, is sure how he will hold up after missing last season with focal glomerulosclerosis, a disease that impairs the kidneys' ability to filter blood.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda Welsh's book was born as scribbles on scraps of paper. Thoughts and words and a jumble of emotions: fear and anger and fatigue and depression dragging on for days and weeks, then months and years. Eventually, the ideas she recorded during 60 to 70 trips to the hospital - most of them emergencies - made their way into a journal. Welsh had the makings of a book that she hopes will help others through where she has already been. For 15 years, Welsh and her two children lived with the chronic illness of her late husband, Barney Welsh, a Philadelphia trial lawyer who died in February of complications related to kidney disease.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another medical guideline. Another controversy. This time, a group of experts wants to redefine high blood pressure - it's now OK for some of us to be a little higher, they say - and other doctors are resisting the change. Raymond Townsend, a kidney specialist at the University of Pennsylvania who helped write the new guidelines, said the group's work is based on the best available evidence from high-quality clinical trials. Published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2012
DEAR ABBY: For years, I suffered from high blood pressure and diabetes. I never had a clue that they are the two leading causes of kidney failure. After reading in your column about National Kidney Month, I decided to take your suggestion and go to the National Kidney Foundation website at kidney.org. When I attended their free screening through the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP), I found out that high blood pressure can damage the kidney, and that diabetes is the No. 1 risk factor for kidney disease.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering from chronic kidney disease for a year and experiencing fatigue in recent months, Bishop Joseph Galante of the Catholic Diocese of Camden will begin dialysis treatments six times weekly beginning this month. In an online letter to members of the diocese, Galante said he had a series of medical procedures to prepare him for dialysis. The date of his first treatment has not been set, diocese spokesman Peter Feuerherd said. Though the sessions will last up to three hours each, Galante expects to continue his regular duties.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
THE LIFE of a reporter can be pretty tough sometimes. For example, you try taking notes while participating in a swim meet. KYW Newsradio's Jim Melwert knows how hard it is firsthand. Last week, with a little help from the Gift of Life program, Melwert was in Houston reporting on and participating in the Transplant Games of America, an Olympics-style event for people who have donated or received an organ. In 2006, Melwert stepped in to give his aunt Jean DelMuto , who had polycystic kidney disease, one of his kidneys.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Burke Jr., 73, of Jenkintown, former director of nephrology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, died Monday, March 10, of pneumonia at St. Joseph Villa, Flourtown. Dr. Burke's career spanned 40 years at the hospital, where he was considered one of the region's top nephrologists for kidney treatment. He was honored in 2011 as the Beatrice F. Nicoletti professor of nephrology by the Philadelphia institution. He was born in Philadelphia at Jefferson and raised in Drexel Hill.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
Starting at age 15, Katrina battled kidney disease. She could not hold her urine and had to seek out a bathroom every two hours. Her friends noticed and teased her about her small bladder. After months of worrying in silence, she finally found the courage to tell her mother. "Something is wrong," she said. They made an appointment to see the family doctor, who listened carefully to Katrina's story, took a urine sample, and ordered a few routine studies. It turned out that Katrina had early renal failure due to Alport syndrome, a rare disease also known as IgA nephropathy.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Theresa Welsh, a Haddonfield pediatrician, agreed to donate her kidney to a stranger, to start a chain of kidney donations, she had one requirement: get the operation done with before her first grandchild arrived. The surgery was Oct. 22. She was back to work part time in two weeks, seeing her own patients. And she will spend Christmas Day with her new grandson, Evan, born Dec. 5. "I do feel perfectly fine," she said. Her right kidney has stepped up its performance beautifully, making up for the loss of her left.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another medical guideline. Another controversy. This time, a group of experts wants to redefine high blood pressure - it's now OK for some of us to be a little higher, they say - and other doctors are resisting the change. Raymond Townsend, a kidney specialist at the University of Pennsylvania who helped write the new guidelines, said the group's work is based on the best available evidence from high-quality clinical trials. Published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
DEAR ABBY: I always knew high blood pressure ran in my family, but I never realized that it could cause kidney disease. Because I felt healthy, I hadn't worried about my "borderline" hypertension. Turns out, my kidneys were silently being damaged. I have since made lifestyle changes to control my blood pressure and prevent further damage. These include daily exercise and cutting back on salt, sweets and fast food. March is National Kidney Month, and March 14 is World Kidney Day. The National Kidney Foundation is urging Americans to learn their risk factors for kidney disease and to get their kidneys checked with a simple urine and blood test.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Michael Tarm, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan was released from prison before dawn Wednesday, stopping only briefly at a halfway house before he was allowed to travel home to serve the rest of his sentence for corruption. By midday, Ryan was sitting in the living room of his spacious home in a leafy northern Illinois neighborhood in Kankakee, beaming and surrounded by his children and grandchildren, said Jim Thompson, his attorney and also a former governor. Ryan's discharge to home confinement just hours after arriving at the halfway house seemed to surprise even Thompson, who insisted Ryan got no special treatment.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The e-mail that Nancy Gleason received last September was lengthy: a last-ditch plea from a distant relative, writing to ask if she knew anyone who might be willing to donate a kidney to a stranger. Gleason clicked the "forward" button and typed in her husband's e-mail address. Her e-mail was just one line long: "We're both O-positive. I'm in if you are. " Eight months later, Chief Joe Gleason of the West Goshen Police Department was heading into surgery at the Mayo Clinic, about to give a major organ to a woman he had met two days before.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012
1QUIT SMOKING. The verdict has been in on this one since 1960, when the Surgeon General announced that smoking was harmful to your health. Besides that, it stains your teeth and hands, and gives you halitosis (bad breath). 2WEAR A SEAT BELT. Statistics show that seat belts add to longevity and help alleviate potential injuries in car crashes. Buckle down and buckle up. 3FLOSS YOUR TEETH. Recent studies make a direct connection between longevity and flossing. It's simple - brush and floss every day. 4DON'T DRINK TOO MUCH.
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