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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | BY VOLODYMYR LANOVOY, From the New York Times
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ukraine has been determined to become a full member of the world community. But in the West, Ukraine is seen as unpredictable and unreasonable, particularly in its dealings with Russia. We are often charged with reckless nationalism, but the claim is seldom examined. Ukraine has been losing the propaganda war, creating unwanted and unnecessary dangers for everyone. A principal explanation for the misperception is that news accounts and expert opinion in the West have a pro-Russian bias.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
WHEN ROMAN Dzivinskyi, a young Ukrainian man, was rallying for democracy in Kiev's Independence Square in early February, a bomb exploded, ripping off his left hand and shooting more than a thousand pieces of shrapnel into his chest, arms and face. Through the Ukrainian Federation of America, in Jenkintown, Dzivinskyi, 21, is now temporarily living with a host family in Northeast Philadelphia as he receives medical treatment. Sitting in a doctor's office in Montgomery County last week, Dzivinskyi covered his left arm - now a bandaged stump - with the sleeve of his gray, zippered sweatshirt.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Elena Kolbasa was having a hard time Thursday morning believing she was actually in America. She kept looking around her son Edward Kraft's Hatboro home as if it would disappear and she'd find herself back home in Kiev. Mostly, though, she stared at her son with bright eyes. And every time he came close, she grabbed his hand and held it lovingly against her cheek. "Oh, your golden hand, your golden head," she said to him adoringly in her native tongue. Kraft's hand is more precious than gold to 77-year-old Kolbasa.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angered by the deaths this week of more than two dozen demonstrators in Kiev, Philadelphia-area Ukrainians rallied Wednesday on Independence Mall to spotlight the crisis in the Eastern European country. "We are outraged, saddened, and greatly concerned," said Mary Kalyna, an organizer. She called on the world community to freeze the assets and invoke travel restrictions against the ranking members of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych's regime. Kalyna said Ukrainian police snipers, firing rubber-coated steel slugs, "are targeting demonstrators' heads and eyes.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Tests of the amount of radioactivity absorbed by a group of Americans who spent two days in Kiev after the nuclear plant disaster 80 miles away in Chernobyl have led experts from a utility company here to conclude that the accident involved a complete reactor meltdown. That conclusion, however, was disputed by another expert, who said the evidence indicated only a partial meltdown. Also yesterday, there were two separate reports that Soviet officials have contacted West German scientists and asked them about the consequences of a meltdown and about ways of dealing with it. In Michigan, six people who were on a study tour of the Soviet Union were tested yesterday by experts from Consumers Power.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Soviet Union yesterday said new radiation readings showed that Kiev was "absolutely safe" from the Chernobyl nuclear plant's fallout, and a Soviet official was quoted as saying the Kremlin should have announced the accident sooner. Valentin Falin, chairman of the Soviet news agency Novosti, also was quoted as stating that two more people had died as a result of the accident, which would bring the official death toll to four. The West German news magazine Der Spiegel reported that Falin said the two had been among 18 people who were hospitalized in serious condition as a result of the April 26 accident.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | By Donald Kimelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were fireworks here Wednesday night to mark border guards' day, a national holiday, and several hundred people turned out at the monument to Soviet-Ukrainian friendship on the high west bank of the Dnieper River to watch the festivities. The main attraction, apart from the multicolored display bursting high overhead, was a large group of boisterous young men a few years out of uniform, who repeatedly chanted the border guards' theme song and took delight in corralling current members of the service and tossing them bodily into the air. The relaxed gaiety of the bystanders, the sultry breeze perfumed with lilac, and the twilight glow late into the evening all told of carefree summer nights to come.
NEWS
May 3, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Paul Foldi says he's feeling OK, just super-tired, and quickly throws in a micro-caveat: "Wait - tired only from running around - not radiation sickness. " Foldi, 21, of Wilmington, returned to London from Kiev Thursday night. His father, 55, in a separate interview threw in a chilling caveat of his own: "Radiation sickness is not something you notice immediately. " Foldi, an exchange student at the University of Surrey in England, was in Kiev as part of a Russian language course when the Chernobyl nuclear reactor's poisonous cloud first enveloped the Ukraine last week.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | By Virginia Lam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark Panich suffers from arthritis and glaucoma, but that doesn't stop the 59-year-old immigrant from doing what he knows and loves best. Cutting hair and creating art. Yesterday marked a rebirth for Panich, who began his career as a barber in Kiev in the former Soviet Union at age 15. He opened his own barber shop in the Far Northeast after 44 years of trimming hair in someone else's shop. It is a dream come true for a man whose first love is art, but whose reality gave him scissors and shears.
NEWS
February 11, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The only real bit of drama in Russia's presidential campaign was the disappearance of one of the candidates. But Ivan Rybkin's five-day vanishing act ended yesterday when he surfaced in Kiev, the capital of neighboring Ukraine. "I didn't disappear anywhere," Rybkin told the radio station Echo of Moscow. "I have the right to two or three days of personal life. I went to Kiev to see friends, walked around, switched off my mobile phones, and didn't watch TV. " He said he called home when he bought a newspaper in Kiev and read about the furor in Moscow surrounding his absence.
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NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
KIEV, Ukraine - History doesn't usually offer second chances. But Ukraine got a big one Sunday when the pro-Western chocolate king Petro Poroshenko appeared to win a landslide victory for president. Only weeks ago, as Russia gobbled up Crimea and threatened the rest of Ukraine, it wasn't even clear the election could be held. An interim government, installed after the previous president fled in February, was too weak to confront armed separatists acting as proxies for Moscow. Now, with his strong showing, Poroshenko has a chance to thwart Moscow's expansionist ambitions.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In 1905, my grandparents fled a village near Rovno in the Russian Ukraine so my grandfather wouldn't be drafted into the tsar's army. Jews were being pressed into military service for 25 years, he told me, which was all the more reason to escape the hardship and anti-Semitism of rural Russia. He was often nostalgic, not for Ukraine or Russia, but for the smells of the forest where he had worked to cut down trees. For many reasons I never felt drawn to seek out that village, despite several visits to the Soviet Union and Russia, and two to Ukraine in the 1990s.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
I T'S NOT always easy to define what exactly is wrong with America, but whatever it is, it's huge. - Roel Ilargi Meijer, TheAutomaticEarth.com Nobody knows, from sea to shining sea, why we're having all this trouble with our Republic. - Tom McGuane, Ninety-Two in the Shade Despite its Valley Girl origins, the simple term "clueless" turns out to be the most accurate descriptor for America's degenerate zeitgeist. Nobody gets it - the "it" being a rather hefty bundle of issues ranging from our energy bind to the official mismanagement of money, the manipulation of markets, the crimes in banking, the blundering foreign misadventures, the revolving-door corruption in governance, the abandonment of the rule-of-law, the ominous wind-down of the Happy Motoring fiasco and the related tragedy of obsolete suburbia, the contemptuous disregard for the futures of young people, the immersive celebrity-twerking sleaze, the downward spiral of the floundering classes into pizza and Pepsi-induced obesity, methedrine psychosis and tattooed savagery, and the thick patina of public-relations dishonesty that coats all of it like some toxic bacterial overgrowth.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, masked men distributed fliers outside a synagogue in Donetsk, in eastern Ukraine, demanding that all Jews register with the separatist Donetsk People's Republic and pay a fine - or be deported from "the republic. " On his visit to Ukraine this week, Vice President Biden denounced the fliers, insisting there is no place for anti-Semitism in Ukraine. The pro-Russian militants who have seized control of Donetsk insist they had nothing to do with the outrage and claim it was a "provocation" staged by the government in Kiev.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | BY FRIDA GHITIS
THE HEADLINE shouted, "All citizens of Jewish nationality!" The document ordered all Jews over age 16 to register or face deportation, calling them "hostile to the Orthodox Donetsk Republic. " The words stunned Jewish residents of the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk on the first night of Passover, when masked men carrying a Russian flag started handing out sheets with the chilling announcement to community members as they left the synagogue. "Evasion of registration," it warned, "will result in revocation of citizenship and . . . confiscation of property.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
WHEN ROMAN Dzivinskyi, a young Ukrainian man, was rallying for democracy in Kiev's Independence Square in early February, a bomb exploded, ripping off his left hand and shooting more than a thousand pieces of shrapnel into his chest, arms and face. Through the Ukrainian Federation of America, in Jenkintown, Dzivinskyi, 21, is now temporarily living with a host family in Northeast Philadelphia as he receives medical treatment. Sitting in a doctor's office in Montgomery County last week, Dzivinskyi covered his left arm - now a bandaged stump - with the sleeve of his gray, zippered sweatshirt.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IN THE LAST pew of a North Philadelphia cathedral, Wolodymyr Ryndycz stood alone and sang, sending up prayers for his homeland. The turmoil that has taken hold of Ukraine reminded Ryndycz, 85, of his own troubles there more than a half-century ago, when he said the German army took him from his home at 16 and forced him to work in a camp in Bavaria. "I never saw my parents again. Never saw my brother again," he said yesterday, inside the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, on Franklin Street.
TRAVEL
March 17, 2014 | By Sea Kaplan, For The Inquirer
At the end of July I had the unexpected pleasure of taking a river cruise in Russia with a friend. This was exciting - my mother was from Zvenyhorodka, a town north of Kiev in the Ukraine, my father from a suburb south of Kiev. The cruise started out in St. Petersburg and wound up in Moscow. On a scheduled bus trip in Moscow, we went to the Museum of the Jewish History in Russia, the only Jewish museum and Holocaust memorial in the country. When we got to the museum, the men were laying tefillin - wearing black boxes on their foreheads containing verses from the Torah that serve as a reminder of God's intervention during the Exodus from Egypt - so we were ushered upstairs to the balcony for the service.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several members of The Inquirer's Philly50 have operations or sell products in Ukraine, so the internal unrest and the Russian intervention have a direct effect on them. For example, Berwyn-based TE Connectivity Ltd. has 90,000 employees worldwide making and selling electronic products to connect energy, data and communications systems in numerous industries. About 600 of those employees work in two locations in Ukraine: a sales office in the capital of Kiev and a manufacturing plant in Ivano-Frankivsk, which is in the western portion of the country.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At once saddened and inspired by historic events unfolding in Ukraine, demonstrators solemnly gathered Sunday in Center City to bring attention to the loss of life in the Eastern European nation - and to pray for peace. About 200 people, assembling in Thomas Paine Plaza across from City Hall, had initially intended to mourn the loss of nearly 100 lives in Kiev. But news of the swift dismantling of President Viktor Yanukovych's government boosted spirits. "We are both mourning and celebrating," said Mary Kalyna, 59, an organizer who lives in West Mount Airy.
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