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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
People around here were ready; traps had been set, and ships were being searched. Who could have known that some killer bees would take a train and wind up several hundred miles northwest, in Eagle Pass? But that's what they did. And now the experts worry that the much-feared killer bees will hitchhike to some other unsuspecting part of the country. "They are hitchhikers," said geneticist Anita Collins, a bee researcher for the U.S. Department of Agriculture who has been studying Africanized bees since 1976.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who cares about earthquakes, mud slides, traffic jams? Why worry about brushfires or riots or smog? Each year, thousands of newcomers flock to the edge of the blue Pacific, lured by the Southern California sun and sand. Fear certainly is not stopping the newest arrivals, who are settling here in swarms. The killers bees have landed in Los Angeles - and experts say the bees are here to stay. Those infamously nicknamed Africanized honeybees, which swarm and sting by the thousands when threatened, now have colonized most of Southern California, nesting alongside crowded freeways, in housing developments, even in a country club.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
They had experience. They had face nets. They had a can of good commercial wasp spray. So nobody had to tell the three guys from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to bee calm as they climbed deep into the hold of the Sea Wolf at the Tioga Marine Terminal last month. Their mission: to find and destroy the first "killer bees" to arrive in Philadelphia. "When the ship was at sea, they were alive and there was a swarm in there," U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector Ron Blaskovich said yesterday.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
After thousands of sensational headlines, reams of frightening film footage and several terrifying books, the thing that Americans have been dreading for the last 25 years is finally about to arrive. The killer bees are actually, really, honestly on the way. Federal researchers along the U.S.-Mexican border near here say the advance line of bee forces is likely to invade the United States via South Texas as early as next March. And although the researchers and other experts fear the bees' arrival, they say they are more worried about something potentially worse: a media-driven panic that could leave Americans with the attitude that all bees are about as trustworthy as pit bulls.
SPORTS
September 15, 1988 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that all the Olympic crew trials are over, club affiliations don't mean much. A Penn AC rower, a Vesper rower, it doesn't matter. They are all USA rowers now. Still, Penn AC coach Ted Nash couldn't resist one last bash. The venerable Philadelphia club, housed in a rather dilapidated building in the middle of Boathouse Row, is sending 12 rowers and two coaches to Seoul. "We sent 17 people to the World Championships last year," said Nash. "But this is the most we've ever had in the Olympics, and I'm so proud that I decided we just had to have a sendoff party.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By Guy Gugliotta, WASHINGTON POST
Maybe we should simply surrender. After nearly three years of pesticides and fly swatters, it is clear that the United States, the most powerful nation in the world, doesn't have a clue about how to stop the spread of the Africanized honeybee. Maybe there are more important things to worry about. Except that two weeks ago an 82-year-old farmer, Lino Lopez, died after receiving 40 stings from Africanized bees living in an abandoned house in Rio Grande City, Texas, near the Mexican border.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Killer bees, meet the killer legislature. Pennsylvania lawmakers might be criticized for failing to act promptly on certain issues, but that doesn't mean they can't fly into action when something bugs them. Such as killer bees. An Indiana County senator has introduced legislation to require all beekeepers to register their apiaries with the state Department of Agriculture every two years. "You've been reading nationally about bees from South America," Sen. Patrick J. Stapleton, who is sponsoring the bee bill at the behest of the Casey administration, said yesterday.
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | From Inquirer wire services
'KILLER BEES' CLAIM ANOTHER U.S. VICTIM Mary Williams, 88, was trying to shut the door of an abandoned shed in Apache Junction, Ariz., last Friday when she was attacked by a swarm of "killer bees. " Four days later she was dead - the second confirmed U.S. victim of the Africanized honeybees since they entered the country in 1990, officials said. Williams was stung more than 5,000 times by the bees, who had established an 8-by-13-foot hive in the shed. Scientists say the bees - an accidental hybrid of African bees with the more docile European species - generally attack only when disturbed.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | BY DAVE BARRY
Well, in case anybody is interested, it looks like we're about to be eaten by insects. You may have missed this, because it was reported in the section of the newspaper where we put the Major News Events such as the presidential election, which most people wisely skip over. Anyway, we had a story stating that several million locusts have flown over to the Caribbean from Africa. Did you hear me? I said SEVERAL MILLION LOCUSTS HAVE FLOWN OVER TO THE CARIBBEAN FROM AFRICA. Think about that.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | by Howard Breuer, Special to the Daily News
A crew working on a "Brady Bunch" movie was told to stop production after it posted signs along the Ventura Freeway warning motorists to expect gang wars, riots, toxic spraying and killer bees. The signs were part of a joke sequence that will accompany the opening credits of the Paramount Pictures film, scheduled for release next year. "This is a gag," said Lapacazo Sandoval, a Paramount Pictures publicist. "No one would take 'Killer Bee Crossing' seriously. " But no one was laughing at the state Department of Transportation, and some motorists did take the signs seriously, complaining to Caltrans and to the California Highway Patrol, authorities said.
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NEWS
May 10, 2010
THE GAS TANK'S empty, moths are eating the upholstery, the wheels are falling off the bus, but in its wisdom and grace, City Council last week passed, 14-3, a feel-good, factually bad anti-Arizona resolution. It was like a zoo chimp throwing poop at those outside the bars. Council condemned Arizona's anti- illegal -immigrant bill, SB 1070, and called for an economic boycott. The resolution was sponsored by Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez, who said she'd talk with me about this on Friday, then didn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
A team on which Norman Osborn, the original Green Goblin, is the leader and can legally hunt down heroes like Spider-Man is a wonderfully insane idea. Thankfully, in the post-Civil War Marvel Universe such a unique and interesting concept has become a reality that can be enjoyed in the pages of "Thunderbolts. " Once a team which saw former lower-tier villains like Speed Demon and the Beetle pursue heroic endeavors in the name of redemption, the passage of the Super-Human Registration Act dramatically changed the team's lineup and purpose.
SPORTS
July 15, 2008 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chase Utley is not much of a fan of the limelight. If there were TV cameras at one end of a tunnel and a fire, killer bees and Kimbo Slice at the other end, Utley might try to run through the fire and killer bees and fight Slice to escape. But Utley inadvertently put himself into the type of situation he loathes when he uttered an obscenity as he was introduced before the Home Run Derby last night at Yankee Stadium. As Utley ran onto the field to stand next to Florida Marlins second baseman Dan Uggla, New York Mets fans lustily booed Utley.
NEWS
December 3, 2004 | By R. Anne Murphy
Few people fall deeply in love with a dirt road, as I did. Its moniker, Marlton Parkway, had screamed covert plans 14 years ago, but in December 1990 I was in denial. I slammed my claiming stake into the ground to settle into the Marlton planned community of Kings Grant, five miles in from Route 73. But the township nucleus, to my chagrin, would turn into a fashionable Calcutta marketplace of gas-powered oxen and strip-center tents of steel and drywall - a mecca of commercial development and traffic mayhem in South Jersey.
SPORTS
September 25, 2002 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cherry Hill West's Marissa Wisniewski scored a goal and did not even lose a finger in the process. The junior deposited the game's lone score off a rebound with 5 minutes, 8 seconds remaining in the contest as the host Lions survived with a 1-0 victory over Paul VI in field hockey yesterday. Frustration was running deep on the Cherry Hill West sideline as the team continued to struggle inside the offensive circle. The Lions, who had scored just four goals in their first four games, failed to generate a shot on any of their seven first-half corners.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who cares about earthquakes, mud slides, traffic jams? Why worry about brushfires or riots or smog? Each year, thousands of newcomers flock to the edge of the blue Pacific, lured by the Southern California sun and sand. Fear certainly is not stopping the newest arrivals, who are settling here in swarms. The killers bees have landed in Los Angeles - and experts say the bees are here to stay. Those infamously nicknamed Africanized honeybees, which swarm and sting by the thousands when threatened, now have colonized most of Southern California, nesting alongside crowded freeways, in housing developments, even in a country club.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | by Ramona Smith , Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
The snails were there before Sandra Geiger-Stivison moved into her house in Fairmount. They were a hungry lot - and they were not particular. They ate the ferns. They ate the flowers. They ate any vegetation they could crawl across. And after about 10 years of this, Geiger-Stivison found out what was going on. Her back yard had been invaded by an alien species. "They're the kind of snails they raise for escargot," she said yesterday. Her brown garden snails, 1 to 2 inches long, really belong near the Mediterranean.
SPORTS
October 7, 1996 | By Joe Fite, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Killer Bees" seems to be an ideal nickname for Archbishop Wood's offensive backfield. Just ask Conwell-Egan about Becker, Burgy, Boyle and Bejzak. The Vikings ran over, through and around the Eagles' defense Friday night and killed Conwell-Egan's hopes for its first win of the season, 38-6, in a Catholic League Northern Division game at Truman's Henry C. Morgan Stadium. With quarterback Mike Becker handing off to running backs Joe Burgy and Dan Boyle along with fullback Mike Bejzak, Wood (3-2 overall, 1-1 league)
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | From Inquirer wire services
'KILLER BEES' CLAIM ANOTHER U.S. VICTIM Mary Williams, 88, was trying to shut the door of an abandoned shed in Apache Junction, Ariz., last Friday when she was attacked by a swarm of "killer bees. " Four days later she was dead - the second confirmed U.S. victim of the Africanized honeybees since they entered the country in 1990, officials said. Williams was stung more than 5,000 times by the bees, who had established an 8-by-13-foot hive in the shed. Scientists say the bees - an accidental hybrid of African bees with the more docile European species - generally attack only when disturbed.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | by Howard Breuer, Special to the Daily News
A crew working on a "Brady Bunch" movie was told to stop production after it posted signs along the Ventura Freeway warning motorists to expect gang wars, riots, toxic spraying and killer bees. The signs were part of a joke sequence that will accompany the opening credits of the Paramount Pictures film, scheduled for release next year. "This is a gag," said Lapacazo Sandoval, a Paramount Pictures publicist. "No one would take 'Killer Bee Crossing' seriously. " But no one was laughing at the state Department of Transportation, and some motorists did take the signs seriously, complaining to Caltrans and to the California Highway Patrol, authorities said.
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