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Kim Jong Il

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NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Joseph Tanfani and Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writers
Korean Americans and scholars in the Philadelphia region reacted with a mixture of rejoicing and wariness to the news of Kim Jong Il's death - hopeful of better relations with the North, even as they worried about a potentially dangerous struggle for power. "We are dancing," said Adam K. Kim of Horsham, former president of the Korean American Association of Greater Philadelphia. "He's dead. It's so wonderful. " He said the news would spark celebrations among Korean emigrants around the world, from South Korea to the United States.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Chico Harlan, Washington Post
SEOUL, South Korea - In power for barely more than a year, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has adhered overwhelmingly to the policies of his father, using a familiar mix of internal repression and nuclear showmanship while all but dashing hopes he would emerge as a Deng Xiaoping-style reformer. Although analysts caution that Kim can still change course, the apparent status quo on policy carries dark implications, extending - perhaps for a generation to come. Tuesday's underground nuclear detonation, coupled with a recent long-range rocket launch and a string of fierce rhetoric toward the United States, represents a clear borrowing from the playbook of Kim Jong Il. Analysts say that the young Kim, believed to be 30, has good reason to embrace his father's cold-blooded strategies.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The premature death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves behind a Shakespearean cast of characters who may not play the roles the late dictator had assigned to them. Kim may have had a stroke in 2008, but his health more recently seemed stable. Observers felt his third son, Kim Jong Un, designated 15 months ago as the heir-apparent, would likely have several years to grow into the role. Instead, the elder Kim's death at age 69, reportedly from a heart attack, now means the rest of the world, in particular a necessarily nervous South Korea, must pay close attention to avoid being caught off guard by an unanticipated shift in the story line.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
North Korea has designated Feb. 16, Kim Jong Il's birthday, its "greatest holiday. " North Korea's previous "greatest holiday" was April 15, the birthday of Kim's father, the late President Kim Il Sung. "It is the unanimous desire of all the Korean people to significantly celebrate the birthday of comrade Kim Jong Il, the great leader of our party and our people, as the greatest holiday of the nation," said the decree, issued Tuesday. Kim, 52 (until next "greatest holiday")
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - North Korea's anointed heir Kim Jong Un led a solemn procession of mourners Tuesday to the glass coffin of his father and longtime ruler - a strong indication that a smooth leadership transition was under way in the country known for secrecy and unpredictability. Weeping members of North Korea's elite filed past the body of Kim Jong Il, which was draped in red cloth and surrounded by stony-faced honor guards and dozens of red and white flowers. Contrived as they might look to Western eyes, the wild expressions of grief at funerals - the convulsive sobbing, pounding, and body-shaking bawling - are an accepted part of Korean Confucian culture.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
Fifty years after North Korean troops stormed across the 38th Parallel into South Korea, the Korean War may finally be ending. It all depends on the real intentions of the world's most peculiar leader, North Korea's Kim Jong Il, who last week hosted the first-ever summit between the leaders of North and South Korea. But things are looking unexpectedly promising. True, it's hard to penetrate the thinking of a man who maintains the last diehard communist state. North Korea has been kept sealed off from the rest of the world, its failed economy unreformed and kept afloat by military sales and international aid. The population starves while the numbers under arms, and the share of the budget that pays for those arms, outstrip any other country.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Jean H. Lee, Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - The "Illustrious General" has had a busy year. Since making his international debut a year ago, Kim Jong Un has been serving as military strategist, political statesman, and trusted deputy to his father, leader Kim Jong Il. The newly minted four-star general, believed to be in his late 20s, is widely credited at home with orchestrating a deadly artillery attack on a front-line South Korean island that nearly brought the...
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Larissa Milne and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
PERTH, Australia - North Koreans are showing their grief at the loss of their "Dear Leader," Kim Jong Il. It is what they have been trained to do, beginning when his father, the late Kim Il Sung, came to power in the late 1940s. We spent five days in North Korea in September, in a relative rarity for Americans, and witnessed firsthand what two generations of relentless propaganda can do to a national psyche. Every citizen wears a pin of "The-Great-Leader-President-Kim-Il-Sung," whose name is always said in exactly this phrasing.
NEWS
March 1, 1994 | Daily News wire services
MOSCOW DIPLOMAT OUSTED IN TIT-FOR-TAT Russia expelled a senior U.S. diplomat yesterday to retaliate for Washington's expulsion of a Russian intelligence officer - a tit-for-tat action reminiscent of the Cold War. Among his own spies, President Boris Yeltsin did some housecleaning, firing the head of Russia's counterintelligence agency, which provides the Kremlin with reports on the political situation inside the country. The abrupt removal of Nikolai Golushko was another sign of continued disarray in Yeltsin's camp, as well as the ongoing turmoil in Russia's internal intelligence operation.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Trudy Rubin
It was painful to watch President Bush rebuff South Korean President Kim Dae Jung this week, by telling him that Washington won't restart talks with North Korea any time soon. Kim won the Nobel Peace Prize last year for his unflagging efforts to promote dialogue with the bizarre regime in the North and to coax its "dear leader," Kim Jong Il, toward more normal behavior. Key to this goal: the elimination of North Korean missiles that threaten the region and might someday be able to hit U.S. territory.
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NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Chico Harlan, Washington Post
SEOUL, South Korea - In power for barely more than a year, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has adhered overwhelmingly to the policies of his father, using a familiar mix of internal repression and nuclear showmanship while all but dashing hopes he would emerge as a Deng Xiaoping-style reformer. Although analysts caution that Kim can still change course, the apparent status quo on policy carries dark implications, extending - perhaps for a generation to come. Tuesday's underground nuclear detonation, coupled with a recent long-range rocket launch and a string of fierce rhetoric toward the United States, represents a clear borrowing from the playbook of Kim Jong Il. Analysts say that the young Kim, believed to be 30, has good reason to embrace his father's cold-blooded strategies.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - Kim Jong Il's son and successor was declared "supreme leader" of North Korea's ruling party, military, and the people during a memorial Thursday for his father in the first public endorsement of his leadership by the government. Kim Jong Un, head bowed and somber in a dark overcoat, stood watching from a balcony at the Grand People's Study House overlooking Kim Il Sung Square, flanked by the top party and military officials and Kim Jong Il's younger sister.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - North Korea's anointed heir Kim Jong Un led a solemn procession of mourners Tuesday to the glass coffin of his father and longtime ruler - a strong indication that a smooth leadership transition was under way in the country known for secrecy and unpredictability. Weeping members of North Korea's elite filed past the body of Kim Jong Il, which was draped in red cloth and surrounded by stony-faced honor guards and dozens of red and white flowers. Contrived as they might look to Western eyes, the wild expressions of grief at funerals - the convulsive sobbing, pounding, and body-shaking bawling - are an accepted part of Korean Confucian culture.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration called for a peaceful and stable leadership transition in North Korea yesterday, but made few demands on a nuclear-armed nation known for its unpredictability, poverty and hostility to the United States. Prospects for new nuclear disarmament talks involving North Korea and the United States appeared to dim with the unexpectedly sudden death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and uncertainty surrounding the planned succession to his politically untested son. Top Obama administration national-security officials are focusing intelligence and other assets on the opaque internal politics of the reclusive communist nation that former President George W. Bush once placed on an "axis of evil" enemies list.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Larissa Milne and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
PERTH, Australia - North Koreans are showing their grief at the loss of their "Dear Leader," Kim Jong Il. It is what they have been trained to do, beginning when his father, the late Kim Il Sung, came to power in the late 1940s. We spent five days in North Korea in September, in a relative rarity for Americans, and witnessed firsthand what two generations of relentless propaganda can do to a national psyche. Every citizen wears a pin of "The-Great-Leader-President-Kim-Il-Sung," whose name is always said in exactly this phrasing.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The premature death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves behind a Shakespearean cast of characters who may not play the roles the late dictator had assigned to them. Kim may have had a stroke in 2008, but his health more recently seemed stable. Observers felt his third son, Kim Jong Un, designated 15 months ago as the heir-apparent, would likely have several years to grow into the role. Instead, the elder Kim's death at age 69, reportedly from a heart attack, now means the rest of the world, in particular a necessarily nervous South Korea, must pay close attention to avoid being caught off guard by an unanticipated shift in the story line.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The obits for North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il are filled with details about his weird personal habits and his country's nukes, but the history books will reveal him as one of the great mass murderers of our times. One of my most chilling journalistic experiences came in 2004 in South Korea, when I was interviewing a handful of North Koreans who had managed to escape to Seoul, and listening to the horrors they'd endured in their home country. Only a few thousand North Koreans have made it out, and they bear witness to the terrible suffering that Kim and his father, Kim Il Sung, inflicted on the North Korean population.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Rafael Wober, Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - North Korea prepared to lay longtime ruler Kim Jong Il to rest while the hermit state's official media lauded his son and heir apparent Tuesday as a person "born of heaven" - suggesting the transition to a new leadership was under way. The state media proclaimed Kim Jong Un a "Great Successor," while a vigilant world watched for any signs of a turbulent transition to the untested leader in an unpredictable nation known...
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Joseph Tanfani and Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writers
Korean Americans and scholars in the Philadelphia region reacted with a mixture of rejoicing and wariness to the news of Kim Jong Il's death - hopeful of better relations with the North, even as they worried about a potentially dangerous struggle for power. "We are dancing," said Adam K. Kim of Horsham, former president of the Korean American Association of Greater Philadelphia. "He's dead. It's so wonderful. " He said the news would spark celebrations among Korean emigrants around the world, from South Korea to the United States.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Jean H. Lee, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - Kim Jong Il, 69, North Korea's mercurial and enigmatic longtime leader, has died. His death was announced Monday by the state television from the North Korean capital, Pyongyang. Kim is believed to have suffered a stroke in 2008, but he had appeared relatively vigorous in photos and video from recent trips to China and Russia and in numerous trips around the country carefully documented by state media. The communist country's leader, reputed to have had a taste for cigars, cognac, and gourmet cuisine, was believed to have had diabetes and heart disease.
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