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NEWS
February 21, 2008
IREAD WITH interest Jill Porter's column "A Chain of Kindness. " I would like to tell you about a kindness extended to my family and me by an anonymous stranger. My youngest son, Chris, is in the Army and had just recently returned from a 15-month deployment to Iraq. The kindness was done just before he returned to Ft. Bliss, Texas, on Jan. 28, 2008. My wife and I, my oldest son and my grandson and, of course, Chris went to dinner at the Outback restaurant on Baltimore Pike in Springfield, Delaware County.
NEWS
July 19, 2006
ON A RECENT weekend, I visited the Showboat in Atlantic City, and, while there, lost my driver's license. After many attempts in trying to get assistance from the Showboat (I mainly received the attention of a very caring cleaning person, Maria, who refused compensation for sifting through trash bags), the result at that time did not look good. For two days, I was stressed out about the loss of this license and continually called the Showboat to inquire as to the fate of my license.
NEWS
July 20, 1990
Sister Mary Scullion, whose work with the homeless is the stuff of legend, has had some success of late in getting several of the city's veteran panhandlers to come off the street and begin straightening out their lives. This work is never easy, and sometimes there are lapses. One of her clients returned to his regular spot near the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel and was literally showered with money by passersby, many of whom said they'd missed him. A touching story, perhaps, but he promptly blew his $90 haul on booze and drugs.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Except for the clink of coins dropped into foreboding machines and the occasional good-natured joke, two men work quietly as they walk the streets of New Hope, protecting tourists from the nagging itch of parking tickets. These are the parking angels, who, with a quarter and a cheerful note saying, "New Hope Meter Angels Have Topped Off Your Expiring Meter," make the point that committing random acts of kindness can be fun. For tourists in the small Delaware River community between Philadelphia and New York, their work brings smiles, instead of the annoying realization, typically followed by profanity, that one has been ticketed.
NEWS
February 15, 2007 | By Lisa Pupo
She was black. I'm white. She lived in the city. I'm from the suburbs. I didn't know her, and she didn't know me. Yet when she offered to drive me back to where I had left my car, I barely hesitated. And I had my 6-year-old daughter with me. This might sound like a teaser for Cold Case Files or a spot on the nightly news, but it had a happy ending. Trust me. We had wandered many blocks from our car in search of a Korean market, and finally landed in front of a small grocery store whose produce was displayed on the sidewalk.
LIVING
March 28, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"Watch me ride my bike!" Gregory crows in delight. "I can use the brakes! Watch me!" Gregory, 9, knows a blessing when he gets one, and his face is pure joy as he rides around on his new bike. This lovable child receives therapy to deal with the neglect and abuse in his background. His big goal is to be in a family that will treat him kindly and keep him safe. "He's making incredible gains in learning what school is for, what's expected of him, and what he's capable of," his social worker says.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Newton H. Johnson, 76, who was lauded for his dedication and his Christian faith, whether he was digging graves, ringing the church bell, or volunteering as a firefighter, died Sunday of cancer at his Mount Holly home. A lifelong Mount Holly resident, Mr. Johnson was a grave-digger from 1963 until becoming ill two months ago. He was one of the last in the area to dig graves by hand. "He was the best - nobody else took the pride in the work that Newt did," said David Perinchief, whose father gave Mr. Johnson his first job digging graves for Perinchief Chapels in Mount Holly.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
D EAR ABBY: Today I saw a former classmate I hadn't seen in 22 years. He always seemed a little slow and different from the rest of us, and he was picked on at school because of it. When I said hello to him and reminded him of my name and that we went to school together, he said, "You danced with me at the prom, and I always thought that was so nice!" I had forgotten that I had danced with him, but obviously the fact that I did meant something to him. My parents raised me to be nice to everyone, even if they weren't in my circle of friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is a reason Philadelphia's most prominent paparazzo - his Philly Chit Chat blog gets more than 5,000 visits a day - is one of the kindest souls you could ever meet. It's because HughE Dillon, who has made a career of photographing celebrities, knows kindness saves lives. Kindness saved his life each time he attempted to end it. And there were three tries. So Dillon, 52, will receive the Lifesaver Award at the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention 's annual gala on Saturday at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
ON SEPT. 7, my faith in the kindness of Philadelphians was restored! My car stalled at the bottom of a hill at Lansdowne Drive and Sweet Briar Road. There's really only a short shoulder and one lane going up to Girard Avenue. Cars are going straight, turning left, and there are only stop signs to slow down traffic. While I put my hazards on and awaited a tow truck, my sister and I counted 21 people, including a police officer, who stopped to see if we were alright, needed a jump or gave us helpful tips, like: "Put your hood up so people will know something's wrong" and "Don't sit in your car, stand on the side.
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NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
This column has a happy ending, but bear with me as I begin with an angry rant about people I know nothing about except how they tick me off. Let's call these people "the dependables," because they tick me off every time. And they achieve this by doing what comes naturally, which is to not think about me or anyone else who might be waiting in a line behind them at a Wawa or a tollbooth or any line formed with the understanding that every person in that line will pay money to a cashier at the end of the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Aaron Posner helped found the Arden Theatre Company here in 1988. He did so with Terrence J. Nolen (now producing artistic director) and Amy L. Murphy (managing director). Then, sensing it was time, he stepped away in 1998 to pursue a writing career. With Thursday's opening of Stupid F#*@king Bird - director Posner's sad and hilarious "sort of" adaptation of The Seagull by Anton Chekhov - he shows that his dramatic instincts are still much the same as when he and Nolen met at Northwestern University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
High Maintenance is about a weed-delivery guy, but it's really about so much more than a weed-delivery guy. It's about how we interact with each other and how we live our lives. Created by Ben Sinclair (who also plays said weed-delivery guy) and Katja Blichfeld, High Maintenance started out as a web series, but will make the transition to HBO, where new episodes start next Friday. But HBO subscribers can catch up on the 19 webisodes - generally about 10 minutes long - before new episodes are telecast.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My 22-year-old daughter is lovely, kind, and smart. She rarely dated in high school, and this was a big disappointment for her, but I assumed it was because she is 5-foot-10 and was very quiet and shy. I told her college boys would be taller and to get involved in extracurriculars and things would be better. She had a happy college experience, top grades, head of her student professional association, and plenty of friends, football, and extracurricular activities. But very minimal dating.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Cheryl Rice
By Cheryl Rice As a leadership and life coach, I've worked with many people who want to make big changes but don't know where to start. I often recommend they take what seems like a ridiculously small first step. Often, it makes a big difference. I've been thinking about this change strategy as I consider the growing divisions in our country. Pundits often comment on the breadth and bitterness of the divides but offer few solutions. And the suggestions they do offer can feel hopelessly complex.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
BERNIE SANDERS loyalists from around the country set up camp around South Jersey this weekend before a huge rally in downtown Philadelphia to show their support on the eve of the Democratic National Convention. Some traveled with groups of people they knew, but others said they found each other on Facebook to connect with after they arrived. Andrea Hafley, 30, of Chicago, traveled with friends to Four Seasons Campground in Pilesgrove, Salem County. She said she is motivated by Sanders and like-minded people who want to rally at the DNC. "This is about the movement, and having everybody come together and still standing strong together for Bernie," she said.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, STAFF WRITER
When 16-year-old Asir Brown was killed in a drive-by shooting at a holiday cookout in South Philadelphia near midnight Sunday, he became at least the sixth victim under age 18 killed by gunfire in the city this year. Now Brown's family and friends are left wondering why his life was taken. "I still don't even believe my little brother is gone," Ameer Brown, 19, said Tuesday. "Why would you take somebody who was next out of the 'hood?" Asir Brown's former coach with the South Philly Hurricanes, Terry Bennett, called his slaying "tragic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Todd Solondz has some advice for budding filmmakers: If you absolutely must cast a dog in your picture, stay away from dachshunds. Solondz had a hard time with the so-called weiner-dog on the set of his new movie, Wiener-Dog . "They have been bred to have a certain look, with the result that they have a deficit in intelligence," said Solondz, who used five dachshunds to portray his film's protagonist, a genial little wiener-dog who is passed...
BUSINESS
June 7, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
America's fleet of nuclear power plants is facing an existential crisis: Despite producing about 60 percent of the nation's carbon-free electricity, nuclear reactors increasingly struggle to compete with power produced from cheap natural gas. Exelon Corp., the nation's biggest nuclear-plant operator, announced last week that it would give early retirements to two money-losing nuclear plants in Illinois, even though they are top producers. Its Three Mile Island Unit 1 near Harrisburg is also facing financial challenges after failing for the second straight year to submit a successful bid in an auction to meet energy needs in PJM, the regional power grid serving 61 million people in Mid-Atlantic and Midwestern states.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Francesca Serritella, Columnist
I'm being gaslighted by my refrigerator. For months, I'd been suspicious of my freezer; specifically, that it's thawing and refreezing my food. A bag of frozen peas, once loose and flexible, is transmuted into a solid block of bumpy ice by the time I go to cook them. No matter how many times I've sneaked "just a spoonful" from a pint of ice cream - yes, living-alone rules - the ice cream's surface will be rendered smooth and flat, the evidence of my nibbling erased. "Maybe I didn't break my diet, after all," I'd say to myself the next night I opened the container.
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