CollectionsKing
IN THE NEWS

King

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 30, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
How do you top Jimmy Choo? You don't. Instead, you bring in more heavy hitters to complement the designer-shoe maven. Like eyewear retailer Oliver Peoples, Italian apparel retailer Bottega Veneta, upscale brand Rag & Bone, and luxury Italian furniture retailer Calligaris. They were all announced on Tuesday as tenants that will be moving into King of Prussia's new corridor, which is due to debut Aug. 18. The 155,000-square-foot corridor is to house 50 new retailers, half of which are considered luxury brands, including those named Tuesday by Simon Property Group's mall division president, David Contis.
NEWS
November 25, 2003
MICHAEL Jackson has the best publicity people in the world. This guy hasn't had a record on the radio in more than 15 years, yet is kept in the limelight constantly. His awful plastic surgery and bleached skin show self-hatred. His sleeping with children is truly a sickness. Hopefully, a jail cell will cure him and save the rest of us from the constant barrage of the media. Most of his records now are syrupy "Save the Children"-type ballads. The self-proclaimed King of Pop should call himself the King of Slop.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Vivian King who appeared for her arraignment yesterday morning looked like a different woman. King, who police say confessed to killing her 17-year-old track star daughter on Jan. 18, showed the court a more remorseful side. During King's arraignment on murder charges, which lasted less than 10 minutes, lawyer Jack McMahon offered a not guilty plea for his client. Clad in a gray suit and white blouse - the same suit she wore for her daughter Shilie Turner's funeral - King looked sad. The suit hung on her tall, large frame - which looked smaller than it did two weeks ago at her pre-trial hearing.
NEWS
December 19, 1999
Tell us about a person in your community who is bringing to life the ideals espoused by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on civil rights, social justice and nonviolence. Send essays of 200 to 300 words by Jan. 3, including a phone number and address for verification, to Community Voices/King, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, PA 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483 or e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
In 1964, Philadelphia communities were struggling with social and racial problems and unemployment, especially for the poor and minorities. People were so frustrated that they turned to violence, damaging stores and homes in North Philadelphia, Bill Meek recalled. In an attempt to bring about change, Meek, along with several other civil rights activists, invited the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the city. Dr. King had been planning a tour of northern cities and accepted their invitation.
NEWS
June 28, 1986
Your June 17 editorial "Long live the King of Swing" made me wistful and sad. About 10 years ago, I saw Benny Goodman at the Temple Music Festival, and he required no introduction, nor was one given. His band started to play, and he walked out a minute later and no one had to announce, "Ladies and gentlemen, here's Benny Goodman. " I think he must have been a very unassuming person. Whoever wrote your editorial really paid tribute and said it all with the last line: "Move over Gabriel, the King of Swing is coming.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who was named editor of The Inquirer yesterday has a big-city job and country tastes. He lives on a 25-acre farm in Glenmoore, Chester County, drives a pickup truck, tends goats and chops his own wood. He is a serious athlete who in one day will cycle 30 miles, run a few miles, play tennis and basketball and then swim to cool off. But Maxwell E.P. King, 46, has also acquired a reputation during nearly two decades at The Inquirer as a bright, able journalist and executive.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Janice M. Wildemann, 57, of King of Prussia, died on Aug. 27 while vacationing in Sea Isle City, N.J., with her family. Upon her return from a stroll on the boardwalk, she experienced an asthma attack that resulted in a cardiac arrest, according to a family member. Mrs. Wildemann was raised in Narberth and graduated from Merion Mercy Academy in 1949. She married Leonard Walter Wildemann in 1953. The couple were married for 31 years. He died in 1984. Mrs. Wildemann was a clerk for J.C. Penney in King of Prussia for the last 15 years.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
WAYNESBURG, Pa. - Jim Popielarcheck's dad was a coal miner for 40 years, and he followed the old man underground. In turn, when it was time, his son J.W. descended into the earth. That's been the story for generations in Greene County, a piece of Appalachia in the farthest southwest corner of Pennsylvania, one of the biggest coal-producing counties in the nation, a point of blue-collar pride. But in a place where houses and settlements cling to the sides of mountains, mist rising from the hollers, the way of life coal has provided, and even the promise of America itself, can feel precarious here in the final weeks before the nation elects a new president.
SPORTS
September 14, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, STAFF WRITER
Soosung Whang has a long memory. The Central junior defensive back was denied his first high school touchdown last year after his interception return was negated because of a penalty. Monday afternoon, however, Whang couldn't be denied early - then nearly got another score - in the Lancers' 30-6 mauling of Martin Luther King. The game was part of the Public League's makeup slate after the weekend's heat-related postponements. Whang, also Central's kicker, gave the Lancers (2-0)
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Teachers at the Pennsylvania Virtual Charter School in King of Prussia have unionized. After a long wait that included a controversial decision by the National Labor Relations Board, ballots showed that teachers at the school voted, 57-15, in favor of being represented by the PA Virtual Education Association, an affiliate of the Pennsylvania State Education Association. Teachers voted in 2015, but the ballots were immediately impounded when the school challenged the NLRB's jurisdiction.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Roger King, 72, a towering figure in Philadelphia law enforcement during a decades-long career as a top homicide prosecutor in the District Attorney's Office, died Wednesday morning, Aug. 24, in hospice care in Wyndmoor. The cause of death was metastatic kidney cancer, said his wife, Sharon Wainright. He had battled the disease for two years. "Roger had a heart of gold," Wainright said. "He was very proud of the work that he had done. " Mr. King spent three decades prosecuting homicides in Philadelphia, including some of the city's most notorious cases, such as the conviction of David Dickson Jr., a former Drexel University security guard with a foot fetish who strangled a 20-year-old student in 1984.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Deb Lutz was making a high-six-figure salary at Johnson & Johnson as vice president of marketing just three years ago. But her entrepreneurial spirit (she bought and sold professional baseball cards to help pay her way through Wharton undergrad, Class of 1991) and her other life as a foodie got the best of her. She ditched corporate America and went for a fresh start. Two years ago, at age 45, she opened a b.good franchise - a healthy, fast-casual restaurant that serves in-house-ground burgers, vegetable/fruit smoothies, and other fresh dishes in Marlton.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Good bye, Plaza. So long, Court. At 9:45 a.m. Thursday, King of Prussia Mall was officially declared "one mall" by owner Simon Property Group. Hello Bonobos and Calligaris. Bring it on, Jimmy Choo, Vince, and CH Carolina Herrera. The East Coast's premiere shopping mall just grew by about 500,000 square feet. It now includes a 155,000-square-foot connector that ties together the two former sections for the first time, and an added 250,000-square-foot wing, home to 50 new retailers and restaurants.
NEWS
August 20, 2016
When it comes to attracting upscale retail in the region, it was clear King of Prussia had an advantage over Center City. But as of Thursday, we can say - in the fight for luring top fashion brands here - the mall has been victorious. King of Prussia unveiled its gleaming, 155,000-square-foot expansion Thursday morning that looked more like New York's Fifth Avenue than the wing of an indoor suburban mall. With brands like Carolina Herrera, MCM, Gucci, Jimmy Choo, Bottega Veneta, and Diane von Furstenberg - my New York Fashion Week designer favorite opening its first location in Pennsylvania here - it's a high-end shopper's dream.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
It took more than half a century, but who's counting? King of Prussia becomes one humongous mall on Thursday. Normally, there's a ribbon cutting at these things. Not this time. Execs at powerhouse mall owner Simon Property Group plan to connect two ribbons. They'll take one ribbon from the Plaza, one from the Court, and connect them at Savor, the new food pavilion, and announce the Plaza and Court as "no more," only King of Prussia. "We're giving that to you early," David Contis, president of Simon Malls, said in a giddy manner over the phone on Aug. 5. "It's going to be pretty neat.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
BORN AT THE START of the Great Depression in 1929, Pauline King Blakney grew up in a family of strivers, business owners and civic-minded people who made sure their children were exposed to music, art, and cultural opportunities. Ms. Blakney, 87, who sang opera as a teenager and won an award for her painting as a young woman, died Saturday, July 30, at her home in Northeast Philadelphia. She was among the first African Americans to be hired by John Wanamaker and the very first to be hired locally at an F.W. Woolworth Co. store, family members said.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
John Dougherty did exactly what you'd expect John Dougherty to do Friday as federal investigators hauled box after box of evidence from his Moyamensing Avenue home: The powerful union leader and political kingmaker played it cool. Sure, he paced. But he also offered swarms of reporters wilting in the summer sun iced tea and doughnuts, and cocksure confidence. "I've had many, many subpoenas and many, many visits. I'm not making rookie mistakes. I've been doing this for 25 years," he said in his Cagneyesque rat-a-tat, while G-men carted away their boxes and a computer.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|