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King Kong

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011
TCM ESSENTIALS JR. 8 p.m. Sunday, TCM. THE NEW HOST of "TCM Essentials Jr. " doesn't claim to know what classic movies parents should be introducing to their children this summer. He just knows what he likes. "The picks weren't so much about like what, oh, what will parents like, what will kids like, whatever," said "Saturday Night Live" player Bill Hader in a recent phone interview. "It was mostly just personal preference and what I was into and stuff that I have like a personal story on. " Hader, who'll be 33 on Tuesday, is enough of an old-movie buff to have done a stint as one of TCM's guest programmers, and his new gig, in which he replaces actor John Lithgow, grew out of that one, he said.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
The reluctant ape that had been sagging from the tower of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. most of the week has been restored to his full chest-beating bestiality by the wonders of technology. The 40-foot ape, installed atop the Broad and Callowhill streets landmark to promote the Daily News' new PM edition, lost his gusto Monday, when high winds ripped open his vinyl side. It drooped in a sad parody of the jungle ferocity one would expect from a cousin to King Kong. Passers-by 18 stories below did not exactly go bananas at the deplorable sight, but enough called to express concern for the creature's well-being to make it clear that brotherly love here extends even to overgrown balloons peddling newspapers.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By DON HASKIN, Daily News Staff Writer
No matter what you think, King Kong's plight today is not an April Fool's joke. In fact, instead of the abba dabba honeymoon the huge beast expected in Philadelphia, he is about to undergo his second round of surgery since arriving here Sunday. Kong was hired to promote the Daily News' new PM edition. But he collapsed Monday when high winds tore a huge gash in his vinyl side as he hung from the 18-story building that houses the Daily News and the Inquirer at Broad and Callowhill streets.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Since he's an obituary writer, it was only natural that the Daily News' Jim Nicholson should begin a death watch when King Kong's gigantic nylon arm appeared outside his 14th-floor window. That was around noon yesterday, and the huge inflatable ape, perched atop Philadelphia Newspapers Inc.'s 18-story building to advertise the new Daily News PM edition, seemed to be running out of gas. A wind-whipped rip in his 40-foot, vinyl-coated body had the newspaper- hawking gorilla leaning grotesquely over Broad Street.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | By DON HASKIN, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Daily News' beloved King Kong sprang a leak on March 30, we reached out to our faithful followers for get-well cards. The response was overwhelming. We're giving free family memberships to the Philadelphia Zoo to those who wrote the funniest, most poignant and most original cards. And because of the torrent of gorilla greetings we got from schoolchildren, the Daily News will sponsor class trips to the zoo for five classes from the Reynolds School, 24th and Jefferson streets; for Mary Pat Junger's kids at the Spring Garden School, 12th and Mellon streets; and Susan DiGregorio's class at the Sharon Hill Elementary School.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By DON HASKIN, Daily News Staff Writer
No matter what you think, King Kong's plight today is not an April Fool's joke. In fact, instead of the abba dabba honeymoon the huge beast expected in Philadelphia, he is about to undergo his second round of surgery since arriving here Sunday. Kong was hired to promote the Daily News' new PM edition. But he collapsed Monday when high winds tore a huge gash in his vinyl side as he hung from the 18-story building that houses the Daily News and the Inquirer at Broad and Callowhill streets.
NEWS
December 7, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When you sit down in the theater to watch King Kong, you may think you're seeing a giant ape storm across the screen, gorgeous blonde in hand, the latest Hollywood retelling of Beauty and the Beast. You're not. Here's what the movie is really about: King Kong is the story of man's elemental animal nature, a depiction of the destructive inner brute that humans struggle to suppress. No, wait. That's not it. King Kong is a tale about slavery and racism, the story of cruel, heartless men who defile an indigenous society and drag its ruler away in chains.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | By DON HASKIN, Daily News Staff Writer
Spring has sprung, the grass has riz. If you read this story, you'll know who the winners of the King Kong contest is. That may not be great poetry - or even good English - but you get the point. The Daily News makes good on yet another promise by fulfilling its covenant with its readers. When our beloved King Kong sprang a leak, we reached out to our faithful followers for get-well cards. As you can see in the accompanying photo, the response was overwhelming. When we issued our call, we said we'd give free family memberships to the Philadelphia Zoo to those who wrote the funniest, most poignant and most original cards, and we are prepared to do just that.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's big, hairy and uncouth, a grunting galoot who refuses to keep his paws off women. It seems we can't let go of him, either. King Kong, the master of the jungle and one of the granddaddies of movie monsters, has reached retirement age, turning 65 this month, yet his grip on our psyche and our pocketbook has rarely been stronger. Disney is planning a year-end release for its big-budget homage to Mighty Joe Young, Kong's poorer cousin. Music stores are stocked with a reissue of the original 1933 King Kong sound track.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - When Ray Harryhausen was 13, he was so overwhelmed by "King Kong" that he vowed he would create otherworldly creatures on film. He fulfilled his desire as an adult, thrilling audiences with skeletons in a sword fight, a gigantic octopus destroying the Golden Gate Bridge and a six-armed dancing goddess. On Tuesday, Harryhausen, 92, died at London's Hammersmith Hospital, where he had been receiving treatment for about a week. Though little known by the general public, Harryhausen made 17 movies that are cherished by devotees of film fantasy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - When Ray Harryhausen was 13, he was so overwhelmed by "King Kong" that he vowed he would create otherworldly creatures on film. He fulfilled his desire as an adult, thrilling audiences with skeletons in a sword fight, a gigantic octopus destroying the Golden Gate Bridge and a six-armed dancing goddess. On Tuesday, Harryhausen, 92, died at London's Hammersmith Hospital, where he had been receiving treatment for about a week. Though little known by the general public, Harryhausen made 17 movies that are cherished by devotees of film fantasy.
SPORTS
April 29, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - His legs were fine, Danny Garcia said, but his arms were tight. The unified light-welterweight world champion was burned out in the later rounds of his bout Saturday night. But he had to go on. And he did. The 25-year-old from Juniata Park turned in an inspiring performance en route to a unanimous 12-round decision over Zab Judah at Brooklyn's Barclays Center. Garcia (26-0, 16 knockouts) scored a crucial eighth-round knockdown and held on as the 35-year-old Judah desperately sought a knockout.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new TV season has two very clear winners so far: Two and a Half Men and NFL football. Together, they account for the 15 top-rated programs this fall, according to stats released Thursday by the NFL. No. 1 was the Sept. 19 Two and a Half Men premiere on CBS, with Ashton Kutcher replacing the terminated Charlie Sheen. About 28.7 million tuned in for the funeral of Sheen's bad-boy character, who apparently got pushed in front of a train by a peeved lover. A close No. 2, according to the league and the Nielsen Co., was the late-afternoon Fox slot on Oct. 16, with 28.4 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011
TCM ESSENTIALS JR. 8 p.m. Sunday, TCM. THE NEW HOST of "TCM Essentials Jr. " doesn't claim to know what classic movies parents should be introducing to their children this summer. He just knows what he likes. "The picks weren't so much about like what, oh, what will parents like, what will kids like, whatever," said "Saturday Night Live" player Bill Hader in a recent phone interview. "It was mostly just personal preference and what I was into and stuff that I have like a personal story on. " Hader, who'll be 33 on Tuesday, is enough of an old-movie buff to have done a stint as one of TCM's guest programmers, and his new gig, in which he replaces actor John Lithgow, grew out of that one, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By LARI ROILING For the Daily News
If you are a movie buff, you've probably seen the 1933 black-and-white classic version of "King Kong" with Fay Wray and Robert Armstrong. And there's the successful and flashy 2005 remake with Naomi Watts and Jack Black. Michael O'Halloran, chef/owner of Old City's well-regarded Bistro 7, brings "King Kong" to mind in the fun name of his newly debuted Northern Liberties restaurant, Kong. O'Halloran and his wife and partner, Sophia Lee, wanted to create a restaurant inspired by the Chinese street food of Hong Kong that is part of Lee's heritage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
If you are a movie buff, you've probably seen the 1933 black-and-white classic version of "King Kong" with Fay Wray and Robert Armstrong. And there's the successful and flashy 2005 remake with Naomi Watts and Jack Black. Michael O'Halloran, chef/owner of Old City's well-regarded Bistro 7, brings "King Kong" to mind in the fun name of his newly debuted Northern Liberties restaurant, Kong. O'Halloran and his wife and partner, Sophia Lee, wanted to create a restaurant inspired by the Chinese street food of Hong Kong that is part of Lee's heritage.
NEWS
September 12, 2006
WHAT A SURPRISE, the Rocky statue is going back to the Art Museum. I have a few other suggestions for commemorative statues. Why not include Bugs Bunny and friends, they've sure made Philadelphians laugh over the years. Why not put Clark Kent in front of the Daily News building or King Kong in front of the Empire State Building? I'm no expert, but artistically speaking, the Rocky statue is a piece of junk. The next time an aircraft carrier comes to Philly, we should strap the statue to a catapult and launch it into the river.
NEWS
December 7, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When you sit down in the theater to watch King Kong, you may think you're seeing a giant ape storm across the screen, gorgeous blonde in hand, the latest Hollywood retelling of Beauty and the Beast. You're not. Here's what the movie is really about: King Kong is the story of man's elemental animal nature, a depiction of the destructive inner brute that humans struggle to suppress. No, wait. That's not it. King Kong is a tale about slavery and racism, the story of cruel, heartless men who defile an indigenous society and drag its ruler away in chains.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Godzilla may just be the cure to Philadelphia's expensive downtown baseball stadium dilemma. With little debate, no City Council resolutions and free of charge, the once and future kick-ass monster levels Tokyo's skyscrapers, apartments, small businesses and power plants in "Godzilla 2000: Millennium. " So how about a little demolition work at 12th and Vine? "Godzilla 2000" is the 23rd film produced by Japan's Toho Studios, which originated the genre back in 1954. It's the first Toho flick to be released in the United States since 1985.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
AAAIEEEEEE! It's a giant CROCODILE that eats people. And it's headed this way!!!! Actually, it already arrived in the new comedy film "Lake Placid," in which Bridget Fonda has to deal with a nasty, 30-foot, sharp-toothed reptile that has somehow migrated to a lake in upstate Maine. How this croc managed to make its way to the United States from its native Asia isn't important. The real question is: Why? The answer: to scare us silly. That has been the goal of every man-eating and/or city-destroying movie monster ever made.
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