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King Memorial

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NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service announced plans Friday to remove an inscription from the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and replace it with a full quotation from the civil rights leader, which the memorial project's architect said would "destroy" the monument. Critics including poet Maya Angelou had said the paraphrase didn't accurately reflect King's words. It reads, "I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness. " Removing the inscription now will amount to "defacing it or scarring it for life," because any new granite would be a noticeably different color, said Ed Jackson Jr., executive architect of the $120 million project.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial, to be dedicated Sunday, is the first monument to a black leader on the National Mall, a landscape devoted to American cultural and political iconography. In Philadelphia, there is no such memorial, to King or any other black leader, in Center City. No African Americans have been favored with a place in the shadow of City Hall, which is nearly ringed by immense statuary of commercial, legal, and manufacturing moguls; generals from the Union Army; and a U.S. president.
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
WASHINGTON - You'd have been hard-pressed to find anybody on the National Mall on Sunday who would dare criticize the memorial to the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Surely nobody would ruin this glorious day. But there had been critics. People flocked to see the memorial after Hurricane Irene forced postponement of the Aug. 28 dedication. It was as if the delay brought them all out of the woodwork - or, in the case of the King memorial, the granite. Why wasn't an African American sculptor chosen instead of Chinese master Lei Yixin, they whined?
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | By Carol D. Leonnig, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After months of quarreling over what piece of Washington real estate would best honor the memory of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., capital planners finally agreed yesterday on a spot for a memorial. The National Capital Planning Commission unanimously chose a four-acre spread along the banks of the Tidal Basin, a short walk from the Lincoln Memorial - where Dr. King gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963 - and across the basin from the Jefferson Memorial. The debate this year to choose among three main sites turned into a divisive ordeal.
NEWS
December 1, 1999
Tomorrow, the site for a national memorial to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. may be picked, after a fitful, confusing process little noted by the public. That doesn't mean the likely choice, a spot near the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the Tidal Basin, is bad. But it requires a leap of imagination and faith. Unlike the other sites considered, this spot is not on the Mall, where the 1963 March on Washington led by Dr. King captured the nation's conscience. It's not near the Lincoln Memorial, where Dr. King delivered a speech that is the one piece of American oratory quoted as often as Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.
NEWS
August 27, 2010
The Rev. Dr. Martin King Jr.'s philosophy of peace may be sorely tested when competing rallies staged by Glenn Beck and the Rev. Al Sharpton come within a stone's throw of each other Saturday at the Lincoln Memorial. But let's hope not. After all, it will be the 47th anniversary of King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Right-wing radio-show host Beck claims that choosing Aug. 28 for his "Restoring Honor" rally, which will feature an appearance by Sarah Palin, was a case of "divine providence," not intent.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama evoked the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s own words about public service Monday as Obama celebrated the life of the late civil rights leader with a volunteer project. The president, along with wife Michelle and daughter Malia, joined other volunteers at Browne Education Center in Washington. During brief remarks, the president said there was no better way to honor King than to do something on behalf of others. He also acknowledged the controversy surrounding a quote on the new MLK memorial in Washington, which is being changed amid criticism that it did not accurately reflect King's words.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Some were locals who have watched for years as the memorial to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. took shape on the National Mall. Some were tourists who happened to be in Washington the day it opened. All felt honored to be a part of history as they gazed at a towering granite sculpture of the civil rights leader. Hundreds of people slowly filed through the entrance to the four-acre memorial site on a warm, sunny Monday morning in the nation's capital. Before reaching the sculpture, they passed through two pieces of granite carved to resemble the sides of a mountain.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
TODAY'S celebration of the Martin Luther King holiday has an obvious geographical focal point: The new King memorial on the Mall in Washington, D.C., dedicated just last October. But it's not likely that the Martin Luther King Jr. of the 1960s would mark this day, or the continuing struggle for justice that it represents, at that place. And as laudable as it is, he might not be satisfied only with volunteering for the MLK Day of Service. Instead, Martin Luther King Jr. probably would be "occupying" Wall Street - or D.C. or Philadelphia or Dubuque - and possibly getting slapped into plastic handcuffs for engaging in civil disobedience.
SPORTS
January 22, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - The 76ers came to Washington for two things. They wanted to pay tribute to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They also hoped to beat the Washington Wizards. The Sixers had to settle for honoring the civil rights leader on his holiday. The Wizards took their third lead with 7 minutes, 22 seconds left in the first quarter and never surrendered it. Washington held on for a 107-99 victory at the Verizon Center. "You feel like you are . . . just small things away from really stealing a win or making it a winnable game with 30 seconds left," Sixers coach Brett Brown said.
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SPORTS
January 22, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
WASHINGTON - Brett Brown is a history buff and loves to fill his head with knowledge of historical figures. That's why he took his team to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in the nation's capital on Sunday. "Just to recognize the day, recognize being in this city," Brown said. "It's a privilege to play on this day. Everybody understands the significance of this day and we wanted to respect the situation and pay a little bit more attention, especially for our young guys. " Earlier this season, during a practice the day after Nelson Mandela died, Brown read to his team many of the struggles Mandela endured and the accomplishments he achieved.
SPORTS
January 22, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - The 76ers came to Washington for two things. They wanted to pay tribute to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They also hoped to beat the Washington Wizards. The Sixers had to settle for honoring the civil rights leader on his holiday. The Wizards took their third lead with 7 minutes, 22 seconds left in the first quarter and never surrendered it. Washington held on for a 107-99 victory at the Verizon Center. "You feel like you are . . . just small things away from really stealing a win or making it a winnable game with 30 seconds left," Sixers coach Brett Brown said.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service announced plans Friday to remove an inscription from the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and replace it with a full quotation from the civil rights leader, which the memorial project's architect said would "destroy" the monument. Critics including poet Maya Angelou had said the paraphrase didn't accurately reflect King's words. It reads, "I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness. " Removing the inscription now will amount to "defacing it or scarring it for life," because any new granite would be a noticeably different color, said Ed Jackson Jr., executive architect of the $120 million project.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama evoked the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s own words about public service Monday as Obama celebrated the life of the late civil rights leader with a volunteer project. The president, along with wife Michelle and daughter Malia, joined other volunteers at Browne Education Center in Washington. During brief remarks, the president said there was no better way to honor King than to do something on behalf of others. He also acknowledged the controversy surrounding a quote on the new MLK memorial in Washington, which is being changed amid criticism that it did not accurately reflect King's words.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
TODAY'S celebration of the Martin Luther King holiday has an obvious geographical focal point: The new King memorial on the Mall in Washington, D.C., dedicated just last October. But it's not likely that the Martin Luther King Jr. of the 1960s would mark this day, or the continuing struggle for justice that it represents, at that place. And as laudable as it is, he might not be satisfied only with volunteering for the MLK Day of Service. Instead, Martin Luther King Jr. probably would be "occupying" Wall Street - or D.C. or Philadelphia or Dubuque - and possibly getting slapped into plastic handcuffs for engaging in civil disobedience.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Jessica Gresko, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A quote carved in stone on the new memorial in Washington to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. will be changed after the inscription was criticized for not accurately reflecting the civil-rights leader's words. The Washington Post first reported Friday the decision to change the inscription, which now reads: "I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness. " The phrase is chiseled into one side of a massive block of granite that includes Dr. King's likeness emerging from the stone.
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
WASHINGTON - You'd have been hard-pressed to find anybody on the National Mall on Sunday who would dare criticize the memorial to the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Surely nobody would ruin this glorious day. But there had been critics. People flocked to see the memorial after Hurricane Irene forced postponement of the Aug. 28 dedication. It was as if the delay brought them all out of the woodwork - or, in the case of the King memorial, the granite. Why wasn't an African American sculptor chosen instead of Chinese master Lei Yixin, they whined?
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | BY NATHAN R. SHRADER
THIRTY feet tall with a price tag just over $120 million, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial just debuted on a four-acre plot on the National Mall. The memorial is a colossal monument to a colossal man who embodied the history, hopes and dreams of America's civil-rights movement. History reminds us of King's leadership, sacrifice, patriotism and dedication to equality and opportunity. But the opening of the monument bearing his image was marred with controversy as American labor was rejected for the project's construction.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was often called a drum major when he led America's civil rights movement. In fact, he preached about it in a 1968 sermon, saying, "If you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was a drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. " Forty years after his death, King's still a leader. His memorial, which would have been formally dedicated today if not for Hurricane Irene, is the first monument to a person of color on the National Mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial, to be dedicated Sunday, is the first monument to a black leader on the National Mall, a landscape devoted to American cultural and political iconography. In Philadelphia, there is no such memorial, to King or any other black leader, in Center City. No African Americans have been favored with a place in the shadow of City Hall, which is nearly ringed by immense statuary of commercial, legal, and manufacturing moguls; generals from the Union Army; and a U.S. president.
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