CollectionsKing Tut
IN THE NEWS

King Tut

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
RIDDLE COMICS GUY this: How is it possible that one of the Batman villains best-known to the general public for the past four decades just concluded his first comic-book battle with the Dark Knight this past month? The answer is simple, if somewhat surprising. King Tut was an adversary created specifically for the 1960s "Batman" TV show and immediately made an indelible impression. Unfortunately, that's because the character was so over-the-top, so ridiculous in both his appearance and actions that he made all the other actors and situations in the camp-fest that was the TV phenomenon look serious enough to be in a Martin Scorsese film.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Philadelphia has been chosen as the fourth and final stop for an exhibition of archaeological artifacts connected to the fabled Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, popularly known as King Tut. The show will begin a two-year American tour in Los Angeles this summer. The Franklin Institute was to announce today that it will present the show of about 130 objects between February and September 2007. About 50 of these objects come from Tut's burial chamber, discovered in 1922. These include a gold coffin that held the teenage pharaoh's viscera, a diamond crown, and a solid-silver ceremonial trumpet.
NEWS
September 14, 1986 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Ramses II: The Pharoah and His Times" is the title of a wonderful show from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo that will be landing in Florida this winter. Although it may not rival the breathtaking King Tut exhibit that toured the United States in the late '70s, it is certainly worth a detour. The Ramses exhibition, which opened in North America last year in Montreal and is currently at the World's Fair in Vancouver, British Columbia, comes to the Jacksonville (Fla.) Convention Center Nov. 17, and it has turned the city on its ear. Organizers have already sold more than 10,000 tickets.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | By Katherine Ramsland
What do the Central Park jogger and King Tut have in common? Thanks to modern forensic science, both cases demonstrate the use of emerging technologies to crack a case. Both also demonstrate the limits of such techniques. And both remind us that no matter how forensic science is used, the ultimate goal should be honoring the victim with the truth. On April 19, 1989, five adolescent males were arrested for attacking a lone female jogger during a "wilding" spree through New York's Central Park.
NEWS
May 10, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Chocolate made in the likeness of King Tut seemed like a sweet - and timely - idea to West Chester's own chocolate king, Christopher Curtin. Curtin, proprietor of ?clat Chocolate, created three delicately formed chocolates for the Franklin Institute exhibit "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs. " Curtin makes desserts in the shape of King Tut's head, a winged scarab and hieroglyphic chocolate shards to celebrate the pharaonic exhibit in Philadelphia, which continues until Sept.
NEWS
May 25, 2007
I'M AN AFRO-American senior-citizen Democrat. I tell my grandkids, when they come into my home using street slang, that you wouldn't go to a job interview and call the executive "boo" or "dawg. " Michael Nutter and his wife are well-educated people, but I'll never vote for someone whose wife refers to him by those terms. Albert C. Wilson, Philadelphia Tut, Tut! Re the King Tut protest: Nobody else cares if King Tut was black or white, people just wanted to see the exhibit.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jay Gorodetzer
As part of a project on Egypt, sixth graders at Glenside-Weldon Elementary transformed part of their school into "The Avenue of the Pyramids. " Some dressed like ancient Egyptians yesterday when they opened their exhibit to the rest of the school. Among the projects was a plaster replica of King Tut's tomb.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
I'LL NEVER DRINK Yuengling as long as this boycott is in effect. I love it as a good Pennsylvania beer, but not as long as the company attacks the rights of its workers to have a union. Even if they haven't touched pay or benefits, now that there is no union at the Pottsville plant, they can take all of that away at anytime. Yuengling has lost one loyal drinker. James Robinson, Philadelphia I applaud Dick Yuengling Jr. for standing up for the welfare of his company.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
IWOULD LIKE to address two issues: The first is how wonderful I think it was that they brought to America the contents of King Tut's tomb. It was appropriate that they did it during Black History Month. (The shortest month of the year, by the way.) King Tut, like all the ancient pharaohs and queens of Egypt, is the ancestor of African-Americans. I hope the untruth that Cleopatra looked like Elizabeth Taylor, or Claudette Colbert, has been realized as just that: An untruth!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1987 | By MADELINE DAVIS, Daily News Finds Columnist
Have you seen the latest Halloween masks? Do you really want to spend $50 to look like Ronald Reagan or a reject from a Clive Barker casting session? Masks used to mean something more. They served important ceremonial functions in their cultures - not just a shortcut costume for a neighbor's holiday party. Christos Kondeatis, an illustrator and paper engineer, has come up with an inexpensive way to get yourself a whole bunch of classic masks. They're all included in his beautiful new book, "Masks: Ten Amazing Masks to Assemble and Wear" (Atlantic Monthly Press, $14.95)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
When people think about the Wanamaker organ - if they think about the Wanamaker organ - they likely associate it with the light show that illuminates Macy's Grand Court in Center City during the Christmas season. That, cautions L. Curt Mangel III, is a mistake. Europeans "worship this instrument," said the organ's curator and chief caretaker. "This is a mecca for organ lovers and organ builders, [yet] most people in Philadelphia don't even know it's here. " Mandel hopes that Philadelphia Open House will help change that.
FOOD
November 11, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Why did it take Brad Craig and Bob Storti four years to turn Toad's Tavern in Conshohocken into 8 East ? They did all the work themselves, and they did it during nights and weekends between their day jobs, says Robin Binnall, the manager. Craig, an electrician, and Storti, a carpenter, are lifelong Conshohocken residents who simply wanted to create a blue-collar pub. They ended up having to gut and refurbish the building, which Storti's father owns. It's off Fayette Street at 8 E. First St. (484-351-8452)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
RIDDLE COMICS GUY this: How is it possible that one of the Batman villains best-known to the general public for the past four decades just concluded his first comic-book battle with the Dark Knight this past month? The answer is simple, if somewhat surprising. King Tut was an adversary created specifically for the 1960s "Batman" TV show and immediately made an indelible impression. Unfortunately, that's because the character was so over-the-top, so ridiculous in both his appearance and actions that he made all the other actors and situations in the camp-fest that was the TV phenomenon look serious enough to be in a Martin Scorsese film.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2007 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A blockbuster exhibit about a boy king and three major conventions over holiday weekends helped propel Philadelphia hotel occupancy and tourism to their best summer in recent memory, hospitality industry officials said yesterday. "The summer was a home run," said Jeff Guaracino, vice president of the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corp. "There was so much to do. And visitors found great hotel deals, especially compared with other East Coast markets. . . . It was the best summer for a long time.
NEWS
September 1, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Egypt's top antiquities official was down in the fabled tomb of Tutankhamun a few weeks ago - doing a television interview, of all things - when he noticed something curious he had never seen before. In a back room closed to public view, Zahi Hawass spotted a cluster of reed boxes crammed with plaster fragments and limestone seals used to stamp hieroglyphs. Intrigued, the scholar took a closer look and saw that both were marked with a trio of icons - sun, scarab and basket - whose meaning he recognized instantly: Neb-kheperu-re, the throne name of the boy pharaoh.
NEWS
July 2, 2007
If it's ever confirmed, this is one of the biggest announcements in the history of archeology. If. See, there's this tooth. But before we get to the tooth, let's look at the hype. When the King Tut exhibit opened in February at the Franklin Institute, special guest Zahi Hawass, secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, gave a stirring speech, predicting stunning Egyptological finds soon, including the identification of: The mummy of Maatkare Hatshepsut, one of the first female rulers in history.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
I'LL NEVER DRINK Yuengling as long as this boycott is in effect. I love it as a good Pennsylvania beer, but not as long as the company attacks the rights of its workers to have a union. Even if they haven't touched pay or benefits, now that there is no union at the Pottsville plant, they can take all of that away at anytime. Yuengling has lost one loyal drinker. James Robinson, Philadelphia I applaud Dick Yuengling Jr. for standing up for the welfare of his company.
NEWS
May 25, 2007
I'M AN AFRO-American senior-citizen Democrat. I tell my grandkids, when they come into my home using street slang, that you wouldn't go to a job interview and call the executive "boo" or "dawg. " Michael Nutter and his wife are well-educated people, but I'll never vote for someone whose wife refers to him by those terms. Albert C. Wilson, Philadelphia Tut, Tut! Re the King Tut protest: Nobody else cares if King Tut was black or white, people just wanted to see the exhibit.
NEWS
May 23, 2007 | By Cody Glenn FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine the thrill British archaeologist Howard Carter felt when he discovered King Tut's tomb after scouring the Egyptian desert for years. Can't see yourself unearthing gold artifacts and the king's sarcophagi? Then try to remember going on childhood scavenger hunts, scurrying around the neighborhood for soda bottles, a library card and a picture of Mike Schmidt. Add a bit of 21st-century technology, and you have geocaching - a craze that is spreading around the world. "It's the thrill of the hunt," says Brian Vaughan of Narberth, who has been caching with his wife and two children for almost three years.
NEWS
May 10, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Chocolate made in the likeness of King Tut seemed like a sweet - and timely - idea to West Chester's own chocolate king, Christopher Curtin. Curtin, proprietor of ?clat Chocolate, created three delicately formed chocolates for the Franklin Institute exhibit "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs. " Curtin makes desserts in the shape of King Tut's head, a winged scarab and hieroglyphic chocolate shards to celebrate the pharaonic exhibit in Philadelphia, which continues until Sept.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|