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Kingpin

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NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two-Face was stoned-faced yesterday as a federal jury in Camden delivered a verdict that could send him to prison for the rest of his life. Juan "Two-Face" Rivera-Velez, 35, showed no reaction as the jury foreman announced four consecutive guilty verdicts, capping nearly eight days of deliberations in a high-profile narcotics trial in U.S. District Court in Camden. Rivera-Velez, nicknamed after his face was disfigured in an auto accident several years ago, was charged with carrying out one murder and attempting a second for convicted Camden drug kingpin Raymond Morales.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The dwindling band of moviegoers who cling to the quaint belief that screenplays should be written on paper rather than bathroom walls emerged numbed and shaken from Dumb and Dumber. But at least they knew that a director would have to go to a landfill with a shovel to come up with anything worse. Peter and Bobby Farrelly, the still unindicted co-conspirators behind Dumb and Dumber, took an earth-mover and dug down until they hit Kingpin, a movie that redefines box office gross.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A founder and boss of the violent Junior Black Mafia drug gang was jailed for life yesterday for overseeing the sale of more than a ton of cocaine on city streets during a six-year reign. Aaron "A.J. " Jones, 30, chose to say nothing before the mandatory life sentence was imposed by U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz. Jones, who is awaiting trial for murder in the state courts, is the second JBM "kingpin" to draw a life sentence for drug dealing. A codefendant, Bryan "Moochie" Thornton, 29, was jailed for life last month by Katz.
NEWS
August 18, 2010 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chanell Cunningham, whose testimony helped convict her kingpin boyfriend of murder, was sentenced Tuesday to 12 years in prison by a federal judge who said she spent years "styling and profiling" as a high-living underworld drug moll. U.S. District Judge Curtis Joyner, in pointed comments to a courtroom packed with family members and friends, told Cunningham that were it not for her cooperation, he would have sentenced her to more than 30 years in prison. He described the 37-year-old mother of two as a "major officer" and "vice president of personnel" for the multimillion-dollar cocaine-distribution network set up by her lover, Maurice Phillips.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chanell Cunningham, an admitted drug dealer whose testimony helped convict her kingpin boyfriend of murder and cocaine trafficking charges, was sentenced to 12 years in prison Wednesday by U.S. District Court Judge Curtis Joyner. Joyner described Cunningham as the "vice president of personnel" for a multimillion dollar cocaine distribution network. "You lived constantly, day-to-day, as a major officer in this conspiracy," the judge said. Cunningham, 37, was a key prosecution witness in the case against Maurice Phillips who was found guilty earlier this year of two murders and various drug, conspiracy and money-laundering charges.
NEWS
August 18, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
Chanell Cunningham, former paramour and business partner of drug kingpin Maurice Phillips and among those who testified against him at his trial in February, reaped her reward yesterday. U.S. District Judge Curtis Joyner sentenced Cunningham to 12 years. Had Cunningham, who has been in federal custody since September 2007, not cooperated, Joyner said he would have sentenced her to 30 years. Cunningham chose not to address the court yesterday but had sent Joyner a letter before sentencing.
NEWS
September 24, 2011 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
IN JANUARY, the former live-in girlfriend of drug kingpin Alton "Ace Capone" Coles gasped and fell to the floor after she was sentenced to two years behind bars on money-laundering charges. Yesterday, Asya Richardson's attorney said her client was "relieved, overjoyed and grateful" after a federal appeals court here threw out the conviction. The three-judge panel, which said the evidence was "insufficient" to support a guilty verdict against Richardson, vacated the conviction and sent the case back to district court for acquittal.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
A jury yesterday convicted reputed Junior Black Mafia kingpin Aaron Jones of the Nov. 3 stabbing and wounding of a fellow inmate at the Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center. Jones, 27, was found guilty of aggravated assault for the attack on Parrish Barnes. A weapons possession charge against Jones was dismissed. Co-defendant Michael Anderson also was convicted of aggravated assault in the attack. Jones' attorney, Gerald Stein, said he plans to appeal. He said the verdict was "inconsistent" and "didn't make any sense" because Jones was found guilty of the stabbing, yet innocent of possessing a weapon.
NEWS
March 27, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony James Zasa Jr. was a model citizen and family man, devoted to helping troubled young people. As a leader in VisionQuest, a national youth rehabilitation organization, Zasa worked with hundreds of teens at facilities in Franklin and Chambersburg, Pa.; New Lisbon, N.J.; and Tucson, Ariz. He led a modest, "squeaky-clean life" over his 25 years in the company, sometimes serving alongside his wife and sons, also VisionQuest employees, said friends and former coworkers. But federal authorities said Zasa had a darker side as a key member of another organization - one that was wrecking lives.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert "Cush" Smith, the millionaire businessman, didn't mind getting his hands dirty once in a while. There was the time, for instance, when he donned an Army fatigue jacket, khaki pants and a hooded sweatshirt, stuck a 9mm pistol in his belt, and went out to hunt down and kill a competitor. And there was the time that this man, who owned mansions and fancy cars and a stable of horses, took time out of his busy schedule to hogtie an employee named Speedy to teach him a few lessons about ethics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORRISTOWN The man authorities dubbed "the Kingpin of Prussia" for running a cocaine trafficking ring out of a King of Prussia apartment complex was sentenced Monday in Montgomery County Court. Judge William J. Furber Jr. gave Charbel Pita-Rosales a seven- to 14-year prison term, said Assistant District Attorney Jason Whalley. The prison term followed sentencing guidelines both sides agreed upon, said defense attorney James E. Lee. Pita-Rosales was one of the people arrested in 2010 and charged with distributing more than 22 pounds of cocaine a month out of Marquis Apartments on Dekalb Pike.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drug kingpin Kaboni Savage sat at his defense table, bowing his head between his arms, as a video recording of his mother was played at his murder trial Tuesday. Savage, a former boxer accused of committing or directing 12 murders while running a sprawling drug network, blew his nose and wiped his eyes with a tissue after the 20-minute video concluded. The video was a Jan. 3 recording of Barbara Savage testifying about the events leading up to the fatal October 2004 firebombing her son is accused of ordering.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
KABONI SAVAGE, the convicted drug dealer facing the death penalty if also convicted of committing or ordering 12 murders, on Monday was portrayed by his attorneys and girlfriend as a good-natured man - even while threatening the girlfriend. It was the first day of the defense team's presentation of its case to the jury after federal prosecutors rested last week, capping 2 1/2 months of testimony. "We got a bond for life. I'd kill you before I let you go," Savage, 38, who is serving 30 years in federal prison for drug conspiracy, reportedly told Crystal Copeland during a phone call recorded by authorities.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
AS A FEDERAL prosecutor on Monday laid out a chilling case against Kaboni Savage, a once-feared North Philadelphia drug kingpin now on trial for 12 murders, some jurors looked pained by what they heard during the first day's proceedings. Savage, who could receive the death penalty, at times smiled as he whispered to his attorney, Christian J. Hoey. Savage, 37, jotted pages of notes on a yellow legal pad as Assistant U.S. Attorney David Troyer told the jurors of the murders the defendant had allegedly committed, of the slayings he's accused of ordering and of the threats he'd allegedly made against the lives of his enemies.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Liam Vaughan, Gavin Finch, and Lindsay Fortado, Bloomberg News
Tom Hayes, one of two former UBS AG traders charged by U.S. prosecutors, is portrayed by American regulators as the kingpin of a three-year campaign that succeeded in manipulating global interest rates. Hayes, 33, was charged with wire fraud and price-fixing, the Department of Justice said in a criminal complaint unsealed Wednesday. The trader and Roger Darin, a former short-term interest-rates trader at UBS whose responsibilities included the firm's Libor quotes in yen, were also charged with conspiracy.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A NORTH PHILLY drug kingpin got a life sentence Tuesday in federal court for running a large-scale drug-trafficking organization that involved his wife and mother-in-law. Alexander "Reds" Rivera's gang operated in a troubled Kensington neighborhood from February 2006 to September 2010. The gang controlled drug distribution around Indiana Avenue and Lawrence Street and in other areas of the city. Rivera, 30, obtained cocaine, crack, heroin and PCP that he and his co-defendants then peddled on the street.
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