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Kitchen Garden

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LIVING
March 20, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flowers go in one bed, vegetables in another. That's how many of us learned to garden. But there's another way, one that combines edible and ornamental, functional and beautiful, in a riotous mix of peas and tomatoes, blueberries and strawberries, with sunflowers and sage tossed in. Scholars call this garden a potager, from the French potage, meaning soup. It's also known as a combination garden or, more popular, a kitchen garden. Rooted in the Middle Ages, this all-in-one approach enjoyed Renaissance renown at the grand French chateaux and now resonates through our own era of gloom and recession.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Were it located in the genteel wilds of Birchrunville, Chester County, say, or Malvern, even, green farmlands lapping at the doorstep, Osteria's poignant gesture to fresh and local might not be that much worth the noting. But for those who haven't had occasion to visit, let us set the scene: The casual sister to Marc Vetri's eponymous Vetri is just a handful of blocks north on Broad Street from Vine, though still south of Temple University, which is to say in a stretch of faded urbanity to which the noun revival cannot (yet)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
larissa Dillon used to mortify her teenage son by wearing her work clothes - a colonial-style getup - while driving him somewhere. "He'd say, 'Oh for God's sake, Mom, you look like a baby in that bonnet!' " she recalls. But Dillon was - and, at 79, remains - unmoved. That's because for this ardent devotee of 18th-century "domestic arts" in Southeastern Pennsylvania, everything about ordinary life at that time, in this place, is worth exploring. If that means "wearing funny clothes" and sporting what looks remarkably like a baby bonnet at the wheel of her car, too bad. And by the way, it's not a bonnet.
LIVING
January 26, 1996 | By Mia Amato, FOR THE INQUIRER
I'm dreaming of a spring garden. At my house (and probably yours), mail-order seed catalogs are arriving in a thick stream, pages falling open to colorful temptations of new vegetables to plant, new flowers to grow in a little kitchen garden. But this is the first year I'm not dizzied into indecision. My dream garden has a theme, and it's based on a trip to southern France - the lovely, vegetable-studded paradise of wine grapes and lavender they call Provence. We were lucky to visit Provence in the harvest season, when the tourists are gone but street markets are still heaped with glorious tomatoes, eggplants, beans, lettuces, grapes, pears, apples and the last sweet summer melons.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
First Lady Michelle Obama has invited the sixth graders from Chester's Stetser Elementary School to join her and schoolchildren from around the country at the White House Monday for the spring planting of her kitchen garden, the White House announced this morning. The children wrote to Mrs. Obama, who has made healthy eating her cause, about having planted a butterfly garden at the school and their plans to start a vegetable garden there. Principal Janet Baldwin wrote that the garden will "make connections for our students around growing and tasting fresh fruits and vegetables," Baldwin wrote in the letter to the first lady.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Penny Soppas says she always has gardened. These days, with three children and a busy pediatric practice in Drexel Hill, time is limited, but gardening is a family tradition and she's not about to break it. About 10 years ago, she started adding herbs to the vegetable garden, and she now grows culinary and medicinal herbs in a little kitchen garden beside the back door. The herbs in the kitchen garden are mainly perennials. Annual herbs, she finds, "are best suited to the vegetable garden.
LIVING
November 17, 1995 | By Mia Amato, FOR THE INQUIRER
The year-round usefulness of a kitchen garden proves itself when you set a harvest or holiday table. Along with herbs and roots for the cook-pot, vegetables can take a starring role in holiday decorating all through your house. Little squashes and gourds from the garden, arranged along a mantel or grouped in a basket, have been a favorite for holiday decorating among generations of kitchen gardeners. The great English gardener Gertrude Jekyll urged their use, over dried arrangements, in the stuffy Victorian parlors of her time.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MENTION the name Claude Monet, and most people think of the acclaimed French artist whom many consider the father of Impressionism. And, while it's true that Monet's work will be prominently featured in the blockbuster show "Discovering the Impressionists: Paul Durand-Ruel and the New Painting," making its only U.S. stop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art starting June 24, Monet himself said, "My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece. " A closer study finds the man as driven by his palate as his palette.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melissa Palmer has already lived a creative life as a master gardener, master beekeeper, hand-spinner of wool, and farmer who has raised sheep, chickens, quail, donkeys, and a goose named Greg. To this list of vocations and avocations, Palmer has added Florum, a floral-design business still in its maiden year. She's having a wonderful time. She thinks dill is "ethereal," for heaven's sake. Then why is she so sad? Palmer explains. The night before our visit, raccoons raided the chicken coop at her Titusville, N.J., farm near Lambertville, and slaughtered 30 beloved chickens.
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NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MENTION the name Claude Monet, and most people think of the acclaimed French artist whom many consider the father of Impressionism. And, while it's true that Monet's work will be prominently featured in the blockbuster show "Discovering the Impressionists: Paul Durand-Ruel and the New Painting," making its only U.S. stop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art starting June 24, Monet himself said, "My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece. " A closer study finds the man as driven by his palate as his palette.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melissa Palmer has already lived a creative life as a master gardener, master beekeeper, hand-spinner of wool, and farmer who has raised sheep, chickens, quail, donkeys, and a goose named Greg. To this list of vocations and avocations, Palmer has added Florum, a floral-design business still in its maiden year. She's having a wonderful time. She thinks dill is "ethereal," for heaven's sake. Then why is she so sad? Palmer explains. The night before our visit, raccoons raided the chicken coop at her Titusville, N.J., farm near Lambertville, and slaughtered 30 beloved chickens.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
larissa Dillon used to mortify her teenage son by wearing her work clothes - a colonial-style getup - while driving him somewhere. "He'd say, 'Oh for God's sake, Mom, you look like a baby in that bonnet!' " she recalls. But Dillon was - and, at 79, remains - unmoved. That's because for this ardent devotee of 18th-century "domestic arts" in Southeastern Pennsylvania, everything about ordinary life at that time, in this place, is worth exploring. If that means "wearing funny clothes" and sporting what looks remarkably like a baby bonnet at the wheel of her car, too bad. And by the way, it's not a bonnet.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Dan Hardy and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last summer, a group of students at Stetser Elementary School in the Chester Upland School District planted and tended two schoolyard gardens as part of a healthy-eating initiative promoted by first lady Michelle Obama. The vegetables they grew were later prepared and served in the school cafeteria. Earlier that year, some students helped prepare the weekly menu for the meals served in all the district's elementary schools. The menus included stories of how the food related to the lives of famous African Americans or to historical events like the 1960 Greensboro, N.C., lunch-counter sit-ins.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Begin pruning rosebushes. Start by removing dead, damaged, or diseased branches, then look for crisscrossing branches that can rub together and cause long-term damage. If your roses tend to get too big each year, trim them down to 18 to 24 inches, removing the oldest canes and leaving newer ones. If you're a passionate rose grower, think about joining the American Rose Society, which will keep you up to date on rose introductions and care tips. Information at www.ars.org/ Continue pulling invasive plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
One morning last week, the force of nature that is William Woys Weaver was getting his hands dirty at Roughwood, his rustic manse in Devon, planting flats of heritage seeds that had been tottering dangerously close to expiration. Various pole limas were on the menu this particular day - Sadie's Climbing Baby Lima, among them, and one of Doctor Martin's coveted Chester County beauties (once sold for a whopping 25 cents a seed), and the purple Blue Shackamaxon Treaty Bean, and old Quaker beans, and seeds that his late grandmother had squirreled away in jars in her own freezer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
You could detect a new step in the spring last week at Noble on Sansom - Grace Wicks, an "edible gardener," pacing the rooftop, plotting a themed kitchen garden (lemon verbena, lemongrass, lemon balm, lemon thyme); the new chef Brinn Sinnott (well-seasoned at Lacroix and, later, Supper) looking to lighter treatments of lamb and Alaskan halibut; the bartender, Christian Gaal, making his own tonic water, for goodness sake, and recasting old-school rum drinks - into the Nor'easter, for one - for an inventive, borderline geeky cocktail menu.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
By George Ball For six months, President Obama has been struggling to save the economy, improve international relations, craft a universal health-care plan, and grapple with a Wall Street meltdown that has stunned the nation and conjured up fears of a worldwide depression. Yet, oddly enough, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and, in the president's case, it's shining just outside his window. On the first day of spring, the Obamas planted a relatively small (990-square-foot)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Were it located in the genteel wilds of Birchrunville, Chester County, say, or Malvern, even, green farmlands lapping at the doorstep, Osteria's poignant gesture to fresh and local might not be that much worth the noting. But for those who haven't had occasion to visit, let us set the scene: The casual sister to Marc Vetri's eponymous Vetri is just a handful of blocks north on Broad Street from Vine, though still south of Temple University, which is to say in a stretch of faded urbanity to which the noun revival cannot (yet)
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