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Klezmer

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Funny how things sometimes turn out. About 15 years ago, Yale Strom was all set to go to law school. Then, one night, when he was living in San Diego, he went to dance where a klezmer band was playing. Strom, trained in violin, was familiar with klezmer. That night, though, it was as if he were hearing it for the first time. He was intrigued by the sound - a blend of Eastern European folk music with Gypsy song, Hebrew chants and the call to prayer of the Arab muezzin. During a break, Strom asked the band leader if he could join in. The band leader said he could not. So Strom decided to form his own klezmer band.
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | Reviews by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Between Heaven and Earth: Music of the Jewish Mystics The Andy Statman Quartet (Shanachie) Forget the cliche of the klezmer band at a bar mitzvah, pumping out "Hava Nagila" by rote. Let clarinet great Andy Statman carry you higher with this rich, reverent and surprisingly hip take on Jewish traditional music. His root material comes from the mystical melodies of Hasidism, a branch of Judaism that uses music to induce a spiritual experience. But rather than treating the music as holy writ, Statman and company use it as a jumping-off point, building on the haunting, minor-keyed themes with free-wheeling jazz improvisations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1993 | By Karl Stark and Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this era of outlandish eclecticism and genre-busting, Don Byron stands out. The dreadlocked jazz clarinetist originally from the South Bronx has just put out an album of vintage klezmer music. That's right, the music of the Jewish shtetl - Eastern European soul - as interpreted by Byron's cadre of expert jazz musicians. Byron isn't clowning around. The clarinetist cut his teeth playing klezmer with former Philadelphian Hankus Netsky at the New England Conservatory of Music, and you almost need a Yiddish dictionary to fully appreciate the intricacies and double-entendres of his new CD - Don Byron Plays the Music of Mickey Katz (Elektra 1/2)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The old man stands numbed and weeping in the lonely silence of the forest where the Gestapo executed his father and hundreds of other Jews more than half a century ago. He is a survivor of the Holocaust, but he is set apart by something very special that has survived with him. Yale Strom's extraordinary The Last Klezmer is a deeply affecting documentary that celebrates the resilience of the human spirit in the wake of unimaginable barbarity, and...
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They call themselves KlezMs (klez-miz). They are four women, playing the music that for a long time was considered strictly men's music. They are three Jews and a Roman Catholic, playing the tunes that used to mark Jewish wedding celebrations. They are the latest bubble in the two-decade-old revival of klezmer. "This is the only music I know of," said Irene Glickman, "that when I play it, it makes me happy, makes me want to get up and dance. . . . "What moves me, what makes me feel good, . . . what makes me love being Jewish, is the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2001 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
While many artists fusing jazz and klezmer concentrate on updating the Yiddish folk form, the New Orleans Klezmer All Stars take the opposite approach. Channeling the second-line struts and funeral marches of their home town, these nice Jewish boys draw extensively on a time when jazz, like classic klezmer, was delightfully raucous, heavily social, and largely collective. There's nothing atavistic about the All Stars; this is a group with no shortage of modernist chops and wit. Its marriage of the two traditions, however, finds more comfortable common ground than some of the more self-serious, avant-klez of recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1996 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If John Zorn plays klezmer music, he does so by throwing it into his jazz stew and letting the listener sort it out. The saxophonist and composer performed Sunday night at International House with Masada, a pianoless quartet, a la Ornette Coleman; many of his compositions, on the surface, came off straight ahead, with deep roots in bop. But deeper listening did bring into focus Zorn's intentions. Throughout the evening's two sets, the quartet provided an intellectual, well-realized combining of traditions - the blues and European Jewish folk music - that share many affinities.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
Adrienne Cooper, 65, an American-born singer, teacher, and curator of Yiddish music who was a pioneer in the effort to keep the embers of that language smoldering for newer generations, died Sunday of adrenal cancer in New York. Although the movement Ms. Cooper helped start in the 1970s and '80s was often described as a Yiddish revival, less sentimental observers acknowledged that a true revival of the spoken language among secular Jews was unlikely, given that people who had learned it in their homes, such as Holocaust survivors and children of turn-of-the-century Jewish immigrants, were dying out. But because of the teaching and organizational work of Ms. Cooper and a handful of others, klezmer has become a popular current of the music mainstream and Yiddish courses are given at scores of colleges.
NEWS
July 1, 2002 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard and Kathy Battaglia had brought their daughter from Haddon Heights to Fairmount Park yesterday afternoon because they wanted to avoid the crowds. "We wanted to do something outdoorsy, family-ish," he said, and were worried that a children's event at Penn's Landing "would be really chaotic. " They chose well. The Neighborhood of Nations event on a field in front of Memorial Hall - one of the Sunoco Welcome America events celebrating the Fourth of July that began Friday and continue through next Sunday - attracted fewer than 100 folks by mid-afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012
Loudon Wainwright III Loudon Wainwright III releases frankly autobiographically and acutely funny folk albums with such regularity that it's easy to take him for granted. A good way to catch up on much of his good music is with 40 Odd Years , the four-CD boxed set that came out on the Shout Factory label last year. But LW3 will not be entombed in a cardboard box: This year, the 66-year-old son of the late journalist Loudon S. Wainwright Jr. put out Older Than My Old Man Now , a 16-song, often hilarious, always astute disquisition on age, family, prescription meds, and the faint memory of sex that I might have put on my year-end Top Ten list if I hadn't taken Wainwright for granted and forgotten it came out. This weekend Loudo plays two shows in the area, one in New Hope and one in Wilmington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Since forming the duo called Archer Spade in 2010, trombonist Dan Blacksberg and guitarist Nick Millevoi have presented music on a fairly regular basis - but in the past, their efforts have been all about them. Their 2012 Commissioning Series featured new compositions written for them by composers Gene Coleman, Dave Soldier, and Johnny DeBlase, while their sporadic Performance Series rarely hosted a concert that didn't include Archer Spade or one of the pair's numerous other projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012
Loudon Wainwright III Loudon Wainwright III releases frankly autobiographically and acutely funny folk albums with such regularity that it's easy to take him for granted. A good way to catch up on much of his good music is with 40 Odd Years , the four-CD boxed set that came out on the Shout Factory label last year. But LW3 will not be entombed in a cardboard box: This year, the 66-year-old son of the late journalist Loudon S. Wainwright Jr. put out Older Than My Old Man Now , a 16-song, often hilarious, always astute disquisition on age, family, prescription meds, and the faint memory of sex that I might have put on my year-end Top Ten list if I hadn't taken Wainwright for granted and forgotten it came out. This weekend Loudo plays two shows in the area, one in New Hope and one in Wilmington.
NEWS
April 8, 2012
Sunday Matter of conscience In John Patrick Shanley's layered and engrossing 2004 drama, Doubt , a nun at a Bronx Catholic school in the 1960s becomes suspicious of a parish priest's attention to a troubled altar boy. Is she right to be mistrustful or are her perceptions the result of the threat to her own rigid beliefs by the progressive pastor? The Tony Award-winning play goes on at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m Sunday at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, 825 Walnut St., and continues with shows at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and 2:30 and 7:30 p.m Saturday and next Sunday.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
Adrienne Cooper, 65, an American-born singer, teacher, and curator of Yiddish music who was a pioneer in the effort to keep the embers of that language smoldering for newer generations, died Sunday of adrenal cancer in New York. Although the movement Ms. Cooper helped start in the 1970s and '80s was often described as a Yiddish revival, less sentimental observers acknowledged that a true revival of the spoken language among secular Jews was unlikely, given that people who had learned it in their homes, such as Holocaust survivors and children of turn-of-the-century Jewish immigrants, were dying out. But because of the teaching and organizational work of Ms. Cooper and a handful of others, klezmer has become a popular current of the music mainstream and Yiddish courses are given at scores of colleges.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Saint Vincent Ferrer (1350-1419), was a missionary and logician. Annie Clark (1982- ), the American singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist who goes by the name St. Vincent, brings a missionary zeal to her current status as indie's ambassador of goodwill from The Other Side. Likewise, despite all its head-spinning detours and U-turns, her music follows the pristine logic of a flowchart. Such was the case Thursday night when St. Vincent stunned a near-capacity crowd in the sweaty basement of the First Unitarian Church with a flawless recreation of selections from Actor, her just-released and deservedly hyped sophomore collection of otherworldly, asymmetrical pop. Clark plays all the instruments on Actor, but Thursday night she was backed by a crack four-piece band - a flutist/saxophonist, a violinist, a bassist, and a drummer - that expertly replicated the album's jigsaw arrangements and dreamy vistas.
NEWS
January 12, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Franz Nicolay has been one of pop's most entertaining sidemen since audiences first spied his handlebar-mustachioed face in the late '90s. The Brooklyn-based multi-instrumentalist has been part of the frenetic cabaret World/Inferno Friendship Society, the riff-rocking the Hold Steady and, more recently, the gypsy klezmer outfit Guignol. But no man with so prominent a mustache and such audacious talent can stay in the background. Though his worth as a composer and crooner is apparent from his debut solo CD, Major General (out tomorrow)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2007 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Osvaldo Golijov's acclaimed "Ainadamar" will be presented next year in a unique collaboration involving the Curtis Institute of Music, the Opera Company of Philadelphia and the Kimmel Center. A recent Grammy winner for best opera recording and best classical contemporary composition, "Ainamadar" has been a success since its 2003 premiere at Tanglewood, led by Curtis alumnus Robert Spano, who recorded a revised version of the work as well. It has been performed in Los Angeles; Santa Fe, N.M.; New York's Lincoln Center; and in London, among other venues.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years, cantor Anita Hochman did the same thing each year when members of M'kor Shalom celebrated Simchat Torah: Play prerecorded music. Then, about eight years ago, she vowed to do something different to mark the end of the annual reading of the Torah and the beginning of another year of readings - a time when people celebrate by dancing with the Torah scrolls in the synagogue. Hochman called on Edmond Weiss, a member of the Cherry Hill synagogue and an accomplished musician.
NEWS
September 14, 2003 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Elaine Hoffman Watts' father taught her to play klezmer music as a little girl, but no one else would hire the female drummer to play the traditional Eastern European Jewish folk music. "It was a man's thing," she said. Not anymore. The revival of klezmer music has brought some long-overdue recognition, say her fellow musicians, to Hoffman Watts, 71, a third-generation klezmer player and the first female percussionist to graduate from the Curtis Institute of Music. These days, she often shares the stage with her trumpet-playing daughter, Susan Watts, as part of the Fabulous Shpielkehs, a Yiddish brass band.
NEWS
September 7, 2003 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bill and Fritzi Wisdom met at a square dance in the 1970s when he was playing banjo and she was playing the fiddle. They got hooked on old-time music - those backcountry tunes from the southern Appalachian mountains - and they have been jammin' together ever since. One of their favorite gigs is Chester County's Old Fiddlers' Picnic in Hibernia County Park, where knots of musicians jam in the woods, filling the valley with the sound of Irish fiddling, klezmer music, bluegrass, and old-time mountain music, said Bill Wisdom, a semiretired Temple University philosophy professor.
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