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NEWS
December 9, 2008
THE RECENT SHOOTING at the Kmart was not a "lover's spat" - it was domestic violence and should be called that. Mr. Birch was clearly a serial abusive partner who disregarded this woman's attempts to get away from him and threatened her with a loaded firearm. Rather than take this as an opportunity to talk about domestic violence and the dangers women (and those around them) face when trying to leave abusive partners, your article minimized the seriousness of the incident. The media have a responsibility not only to report events accurately and conscientiously, but to educate people.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Accusing an employee of being a potato chip thief has left Kmart with a $1.4-million-plus damage verdict hanging over its head. Patricia Rue had been employed by the chain for 12 years when she was canned in 1989 for "concealing and eating a bag of potato chips" at the company's Bucks County distribution center. However, an unemployment- compensation referee ruled that she had not stolen steal a bag of potato chips, so Rue sued. She won $1.4 million in punitive damages and $90,000 in compensatory damages from Kmart last year.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Kmart cashier has been charged with stealing $5,480 from the till by falsely voiding sales and then pocketing the money. Walda M. Staten, 37, of the 1400 block of North 61st Street, Philadelphia, was arrested Wednesday on theft and conspiracy charges. Police say she stole the money from the store, 700 Reed St., by falsely voiding 50 transactions between May 12 and Sept. 7. Police said Kmart videotapes showed the following procedure: Staten would ring up a sale to a customer and "forget" to give the receipt.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | by Christine Bahls, Daily News Staff Writer
The cops called it a "classic robbery. " Two masked men entered a Kmart store in the Northeast in the wee hours yesterday, pulled guns on a cleaning crew and forced a manager to open the safe. Early reports were that about $140,000 was taken, but police later scaled that back. They would not, however, give a precise figure for the loot. Police said eight employees were in the store at Orthodox Street and Castor Avenue when the robbers entered shortly after 4 a.m. They wore gloves and gauze masks, said police spokesman David Yarnell.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A man wheeled a shopping cart up to a counter at a Gloucester Township, Camden County, Kmart and took off with a rotating case holding $27,000 in jewelry. Police said the incident took place 11:15 a.m. Sunday at the Kmart on Blackwood-Clementon Road when a man wearing a Ralph Lauren Polo bucket hat, sunglasses, dark shirt, and jeans was pushing a cart through the store. They said the suspect went to the jewelry counter, leaned over, and cut a security cable holding a rotating case of gold earrings.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1994 | by David Lawder, Reuters Daily News staff writer Francesca Chapman contributed to this report
Kmart Corp., as part of its plan to turn its core discount retailing unit around, said yesterday it will close 110 stores and cut its work force by about 7,650 over 24 months. Philadelphia's five Kmart stores escaped the cuts, a company spokeswoman confirmed. No stores in Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Delaware will close. Kmart, the nation's No. 2 retailer, said the plan would hit mostly older stores that have failed to its meet sales, profit and return-on-investment targets.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kmart will take over the former Clover discount store in the Gallery, giving the Center City mall a lift and filling a void in shopping choices in midtown Philadelphia. The discount merchant's arrival in Center City is good news for Charlotte Weiss, receptionist and de facto housemother at the Hopkinson House apartment building, a few blocks away on Washington Square. "My reaction is, I hope they make it," she said. Weiss, who also lives at the apartment building and doesn't have a car, is in the market for a new comforter for her bedroom, nothing too fancy, nothing too expensive.
NEWS
March 24, 2004 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 26-year-old Montgomery County woman has been arrested and charged with stealing more than $200,000 from a Kmart here since January 2000, police said. Larissa Chlebowski, of East Greenville, was arrested Monday at the store on Route 309, where she had worked for the last five years as a "cash office associate," police said. She was charged with theft, receiving stolen property, unlawful use of a computer, and theft by failure to make required disposition of funds received, police said.
NEWS
December 4, 2008 | By Brittany Talarico and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The man accused of shooting a Kmart store worker Tuesday shot and killed himself yesterday as police tried to arrest him in Northeast Philadelphia. Daryl Anthony Birch, 30, was found dead at 7:30 a.m. in his house on the 100 block of Albanus Street in the city's Olney section. A SWAT team had amassed on the block as detectives prepared to serve Birch with a warrant. Birch shot himself in the head in an upstairs front bedroom, Lt. George McClay of Northwest Detectives said.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kmart will pay $295,000 to a former employee who, according to a federal lawsuit, was sexually assaulted by her supervisor in the company's Norristown store. The payment, part of a consent decree, or voluntary agreement, settles a federal lawsuit filed last year by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which accused the company of failing to investigate the assault on the employee, then a 16-year-old part-time clerk. That failure, the suit said, led to a second assault, less than two months later, by the same supervisor on another teenage female employee.
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NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
With a rumble of its engine, a big yellow backhoe Tuesday crashed its hydraulic arm through a wall of Evesham Township's long-vacant Kmart store, a first step in the demolition - and rehabilitation - of a shopping center the township has long called an eyesore. "It's been a continual process to get where we are today," Mayor Randy Brown told residents and officials gathered at the Tri-Towne Plaza minutes before the backhoe sprang to life in Burlington County's largest municipality. "We've worked longer on this than any other project in Evesham," Brown said.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blue light began to flash, and Angela Campbell bolted toward the front center aisle of the Kmart on 3301 Aramingo Ave. in Northeast Philadelphia. For the next 15 minutes, Campbell, 54, was transported back in time. The flashing bulb was like a disco flashback. She could see herself and her eight siblings in the 1970s, following their mother in tow to the local Kmart. They made a mad dash with their shopping cart whenever they heard the voice on the store intercom alerting them, "Attention Kmart shoppers . . . " It was time for a big markdown of an item located near the flashing blue light.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust, owner of Exton Square Mall in Chester County, plans to demolish the site's Kmart building and replace it with a large-format organic grocery store. PREIT chief executive Joseph Coradino told analysts in a conference call Wednesday that the grocer would be named in the coming days. A lease for 55,000 square feet has been executed, he said. Philadelphia-based PREIT also has identified a dine-in movie theater and a bowling-and-entertainment center as prospective tenants for the former site of a 118,000-square-foot J.C. Penney Co. store at Exton Square, Coradino said.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Three years ago, Shelly Fisher's medical-identification-bracelets company in West Conshohocken, Hope Paige Designs L.L.C., had just started to hit its stride. Her goal - to create jewelry designed not only to potentially save lives but to be fashionable, thus more likely to be worn - had been realized. The market was responding with back-to-back years of doubling sales. And then, about a year later, a light went on for Fisher. A light-emitting diode, or LED, to be precise. It would be the catalyst for a new company, 4id L.L.C., and a new product line of LED-enhanced safety items - lighted adjustable bands, shoelaces, ear buds, and clips for runners, walkers, bikers, skiers, campers, pets - that generated $500,000 in sales in 2014, its first year.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If any company should be comfortable in the cutthroat business of American retail these days, it should be QVC , the West Chester-based instant-shopping outfit. Store chains such as Urban Outfitters are scrambling to reach buyers through smartphone apps, wired warehouses, and data-guided custom offers in social media. Even Walmart is cutting way back on building new stores. Online-sales giant Amazon.com , for all its rapid growth, is barely profitable. QVC has no chain stores, just its high-ceilinged studio/headquarters at the former Commodore Computer complex, a Lancaster County warehouse, and similar centers in Britain, Italy, Germany, Japan, China, and, soon, France.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Claudette Boyd and her teenage daughter, Tamika, took the 17 bus from South Philadelphia early enough Sunday morning to seize an excellent position outside Kmart in the Gallery mall. Shoulder to affectionate shoulder, the two women leaned against a railing, watching the Kmart staff prepare for the onslaught. Behind them, as 11 a.m. approached, the competition gathered. Through the metal mesh security gate they could see dozens of blaring yellow "Everything Must Go!" signs, like flags on an Olympic slalom course, marking the aisles where the race for bargains would momentarily begin.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of the Gallery don't plan to replace Kmart with another store when it closes in April. Instead, the plan is to replace the two-story discount retailer with multiple stores, Joseph F. Coradino, chief executive at the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT), disclosed before speaking to a group of retail real estate professionals at Villanova University on Wednesday. PREIT, based in Center City, operates 35 malls around the nation and eight in the region, including Cherry Hill Mall, Moorestown Mall, and Plymouth Meeting Mall as well as the Gallery.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kmart stores in the Gallery and Northeast Philadelphia will close in late April, the company said Thursday. Liquidation sales will begin Feb. 9. Employees at the Gallery store were told Thursday that the stores would close. But rumors had been rampant for months, and the smell of closure had already settled in. Following the holidays, the Gallery store had been looking sparse, with Christmas decorations and seasonal merchandise cleaned out but not replaced. The Gallery store has 120 employees and the Kmart at 900 Orthodox St. has 169, some of whom will receive severance pay and will be able to apply at other Kmart and Sears stores.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Robbins, 84, a manufacturer's representative for toy companies, died Sunday, July 14, of lung cancer at the home of his former wife in Villanova. Mr. Robbins worked with toy retailers and wholesalers from Maine to Virginia, as well as the Kiddie City stores in the Philadelphia area. Later, he sold toys to Kmart and Toys R Us, and at the time of his death was a sales rep for Wiffle Ball. "They refused to accept his resignation," his daughter Deborah said. Mr. Robbins and his twin, Saul, were born at home on Yewdall Street in West Philadelphia, the fifth and sixth children of Joseph Robbins, a house painter.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust now controls three blocks on Market Street in Center City. Vornado Realty Trust , of Paramus, N.J., said Tuesday that it had completed the sale of the Kmart property at 901 Market St. to PREIT for $60 million. The sale was announced in October. The deal means one owner controls all of the real estate that makes up the Gallery at Market East, which stretches from a Burlington Coat Factory store at 11th and Market to the former Strawbridge & Clothier store, where The Inquirer is now a tenant.
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