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Knee Replacement

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SPORTS
September 20, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Syd Thrift, a former general manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates who spent nearly a half century in baseball, died at 77. He underwent knee replacement surgery Monday in Milford, Del., and died that night, said the Baltimore Orioles, one of many teams for whom he worked. An autopsy will determine the cause of death. "He was a great baseball man - both on and off the field - who dedicated his life to the game," commissioner Bud Selig said. "He was a personal friend of mine and I will miss him. " Thrift became GM of the Pirates in 1985 and gave Jim Leyland his start as a major league manager.
SPORTS
June 13, 2009 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Defenseman Derian Hatcher underwent full right-knee replacement surgery June 1, the Flyers announced yesterday, and it likely signals the end of his career. William Hozack of Rothman Institute performed the surgery at Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, the team said, and Hatcher said yesterday that he felt "really good. " "It is a full knee replacement," Hatcher said. "I think they just go in there and saw some of the bone away and put the new knee in. I kind of know the process, but it is hard to explain.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The operation that entertainer Pearl Bailey is set to undergo today at Pennsylvania Hospital to replace her arthritic left knee is a reflection of both modern medicine and technology. From the plastic and metal inserted under the kneecap to the airflow in the operating room to the rehabilitation devices, this procedure owes its success to the marriage of engineering and surgical techniques. "The biggest problem was working out the engineering principles of doing a knee replacement," said Dr. William J. Hozack, the Pennsylvania Hospital orthopedic surgeon who works with Bailey's surgeon, Dr. Richard Rothman.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two nurses became light-headed and sick to their stomachs this week while assisting in a routine operation at the Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton. One was treated and released. The other has remained hospitalized since the incident Monday morning. "We are very concerned," said Walter Ettinger, the health system's executive vice president for physician services. "We closed the operating room and hired two environmental consultants to look into it. " He said five professionals - a doctor, an anesthesiologist, an intern and the two nurses - were in one of the hospital's seven operating rooms about 9:30 a.m. Monday.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
People who got joint replacements only a few years ago might be surprised by what happens now after patients get their new hips and knees. Now that new payment schemes encourage surgeons and hospitals to pay more attention to the cost and effectiveness of the care patients get when they leave the hospital, postsurgical rehab has become a target for cuts. Where - and how - joint-replacement patients get physical therapy is changing rapidly. Far fewer are going to inpatient facilities for rehab.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
THIS ISN'T the first time the Phanatic's been accused of being too fanatical. In 2010 the Daily News found he'd been sued at least three other times in the previous decade, once for hugging someone too hard. One woman attending a Reading Phillies game with her church group claimed he sat on her legs, making her arthritis act up and leading to a knee replacement, a lawsuit alleged. The resolutions of the lawsuits could not be determined Tuesday. Nor is he the only mascot sued.
SPORTS
September 22, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Wisconsin coach Barry Alvarez will undergo knee-replacement surgery next month because of severe pain that has made him barely able to sleep the past couple of weeks. Alvarez, seated in a wheelchair, said Tuesday that the surgery is planned for Oct. 5 at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. That's three days after the 20th-ranked Badgers play at No. 12 Ohio State. "I've never been sick a day in my life. I'd never had a stitch until I came here," said Alvarez, the coach at Wisconsin since 1990.
NEWS
July 11, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An operation used more than 200,000 times each year to ease the pain of arthritic knees worked no better than a fake surgery, Texas researchers have concluded. Interestingly, though, the placebo surgery wasn't bad. Thirty-five to 40 percent of patients who had undergone either real arthroscopic surgery or a fake operation designed to mimic the real procedure thought they were better, according to a study published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. On average, patients in each group reported a 20 percent improvement in pain and functioning of the knee.
NEWS
September 22, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For the last two months, Lynda Henion has hit the Holy Redeemer Sports Medicine Center three times a week to warm up on a stationary bicycle, walk steps, and do stretching and strengthening exercises. After an accidental tumble in 2010, Henion, 71, had a pin placed in her right hip, followed a year later by a right hip replacement, followed by an operation on the meniscus in her left knee, followed by a right knee replacement in July. After all that surgery, she's eager to return to normal walking.
SPORTS
October 10, 2003 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karyn Pickard won't compromise her standards, which is why she won't be walking the sideline this winter as the Kingsway girls' basketball coach. At this point, Pickard would settle for just being able to walk anywhere without considerable pain. Pickard, a 1978 graduate of Highland, recently underwent replacement surgery on her right knee. She had already had eight surgeries on the knee, including four knee reconstructions. Still, Pickard had managed to coach a variety of sports at Kingsway.
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NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Patients at four Philadelphia-area hospitals suffered a worse-than-expected rate of complications after hip or knee replacements in 2014, according to a new study from a Pennsylvania state agency. Just one, Bryn Mawr Hospital, reported fewer complications than expected following knee replacements. The information, compiled by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, is designed to help consumers evaluate providers of the popular surgeries. Pennsylvania hospitals replaced the hips or knees of more than 56,000 patients that year, up more than 40 percent from a decade earlier.
SPORTS
March 24, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
BOCA RATON, Fla. - Jeffrey Lurie and Andy Reid both talked about Doug Pederson yesterday, and both mentioned how much they like the staff the Eagles' first-year coach has assembled. "We don't change coaches very often, but the transition with Doug has been smooth, outstanding," said Lurie, the Eagles' chairman. "Great communication, high energy. The staff he put together, very excited about. It's important to hire really good coordinators when you're a first-time head coach. That was a big key with Andy, with (special-teams coordinator)
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
People who got joint replacements only a few years ago might be surprised by what happens now after patients get their new hips and knees. Now that new payment schemes encourage surgeons and hospitals to pay more attention to the cost and effectiveness of the care patients get when they leave the hospital, postsurgical rehab has become a target for cuts. Where - and how - joint-replacement patients get physical therapy is changing rapidly. Far fewer are going to inpatient facilities for rehab.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY BROAD STREET BILLY as told to DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
I DANCED WITH you on Broad Street in 2008, I've suffered with you ever since. I worried last night when the Phillies put three walk-through metal detectors at the rightfield gate to test a security system that will be at all gates in all major-league ballparks next season. Fans entering the ballpark through the rightfield gate now must pass through a metal detector before tickets are scanned, and first they have to remove cellphones, cameras and other large metal items. I worried that Phillies fans were bringing enough bad attitude to the ballpark these days to break the detectors' sensors.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BEING A REPUBLICAN in a Democratic city, having five knee replacement surgeries and a heart valve replacement couldn't keep Hank Salvatore down. After all, he had been a tough Marine who saw combat in the South Pacific in World War II, and he survived political battles in Philadelphia and Harrisburg that might have left permanent scars on a lesser man. Frank A. "Hank" Salvatore, a former state legislator and senator from Northeast Philadelphia whose...
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AMID A COURTROOM of tears, a former chief of staff to state Rep. Bill Keller was sentenced yesterday to 18 months in federal prison for misusing state funds. Lorraine DiSpaldo, 58, had pleaded guilty in April to 36 counts, including mail fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy as part of a scam with codefendant Robert Mulgrew, who is now a suspended Traffic Court judge. The two were accused of defrauding the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, which from 1996 to 2008 awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars in grants to two community groups with which Mulgrew and DiSpaldo were associated - the Friends of Dickinson Square and Community to Police Communications.
NEWS
September 22, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For the last two months, Lynda Henion has hit the Holy Redeemer Sports Medicine Center three times a week to warm up on a stationary bicycle, walk steps, and do stretching and strengthening exercises. After an accidental tumble in 2010, Henion, 71, had a pin placed in her right hip, followed a year later by a right hip replacement, followed by an operation on the meniscus in her left knee, followed by a right knee replacement in July. After all that surgery, she's eager to return to normal walking.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013
Authorities said that former Detroit Lions wide receiver Titus Young has been arrested in California for the third time in a week. Orange County Sheriff's spokesman Lt. Joe Balicki said the 23-year-old Young was arrested late Friday in San Clemente for allegedly breaking into a home. Balicki said Young fought with deputies after a foot chase. He has been charged with attempted burglary, assaulting a police officer and resisting arrest. He was in custody Sunday on $75,000 bail.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012
Kevin Durant notched his first career triple-double with 25 points, 13 rebounds, and a career-high 10 assists, and the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the visiting Golden State Warriors, 119-109, on Sunday. The three-time NBA scoring champion has been trying to improve his floor game and reduce turnovers. He came in averaging four per game, fourth-worst in the league. He turned it over just twice in this one and pumped his fist after he set up Kevin Martin's three-pointer with 4 minutes, 57 seconds to play for his 10th assist.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
THIS ISN'T the first time the Phanatic's been accused of being too fanatical. In 2010 the Daily News found he'd been sued at least three other times in the previous decade, once for hugging someone too hard. One woman attending a Reading Phillies game with her church group claimed he sat on her legs, making her arthritis act up and leading to a knee replacement, a lawsuit alleged. The resolutions of the lawsuits could not be determined Tuesday. Nor is he the only mascot sued.
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