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Knoll

NEWS
November 8, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
It looks like Mission Control in Houston - with Phanavision from Veterans Stadium thrown in for good measure. Special phone lines. Computer terminals flashing codes in three colors. Clocks showing times in Zurich, Hong Kong and a half-dozen other cities. Electronic "datawalls" displaying ever-changing indices, analyses and messages. It's the spanking new Treasury Investment Center, a state-of-the-art facility on which State Treasurer Catherine Baker Knoll has spent more than $1 million.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | By Dan Meyers and Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Janet L. Fix contributed to this article
Buoyed by a pledge of cooperation from the state treasurer, the Goode administration yesterday launched an eleventh-hour bid to avert a financial collapse, issuing a formal proposal to sell about $300 million in short-term notes. "It's a negotiating document," said Mayor Goode, who added that the administration would discuss terms with potential investors for the next few days and make an attempt to wrap up the package by the end of next week. The proposal includes a provision, approved by State Treasurer Catherine Baker Knoll, under which the state will route installments of aid due the city into a special account that would be used to repay lenders if Philadelphia could not. Only last week, Knoll, rejecting an administration request to buy up to $100 million in notes, said her attorneys had advised her that such an arrangement for "intercepting" state funds was illegal.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Attention Keystone shoppers: For three days only, state officials are offering something more than political rhetoric, lame excuses and campaign promises. It's the state government version of a Blue Light Special. You could become the new owner of fine jewelry, rare coins and old baseball cards. Would you believe electric razors, mink coats or cuckoo clocks? State Treasurer Catherine Baker Knoll has it all - more than 6,000 items that aren't the usual and necessary trinkets of state government, and she wants to empty her vault.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2007 | Inquirer staff
Nathan W. Jameson was named chief investment officer of Traditions of America, where he will oversee land acquisitions and investments for the Radnor builder. Gavin Sweeney was named director of marketing for the company's six adult communities in Pennsylvania. He was formerly marketing director for Paparone Corp. Richard J. Fagan was named chief financial officer of StarCite Inc., Philadelphia. He is the former CFO of InterDigital Communications Corp. Frances T. Burns was named executive director at Manayunk Development Corp.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
The state Department of Environmental Resources is investigating the alleged dumping of a toxic liquid at a contracting business in Lansdowne. A DER investigator took soil samples Oct. 21 from the J.B. Eurell Co. property at 45 W. Scottdale Rd., DER spokeswoman Chris Novak said. The agency is awaiting the outcome of soil tests. Novak said borough police called the agency after a resident complained of the alleged dumping of a liquid contained in 55-gallon drums at the rear of the property.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2010
In the Region Amick named Discovery Labs CEO Discovery Laboratories Inc. , Warrington, officially named W. Thomas Amick its chief executive officer Friday. Amick has been serving as Discovery's interim CEO since August 2009 and has been chairman of the board since March 2007. Discovery is a biotechnology company that develops treatments for respiratory diseases. - Christopher K. Hepp FDA official hired at Teva Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. , the Israeli manufacturer of generic drugs, said it hired Gary Buehler, the industry's former top federal regulator.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Casey administration is willing to help Philadelphia with a short-term loan that would allow the city to avoid missed payrolls this summer, a top aide to Gov. Casey said yesterday. G. Edward DeSeve, a special assistant to the governor, said state officials "would be willing to consider participating" in purchasing short-term notes if they were offered for sale by the Goode administration. "We're looking at how we would do that," DeSeve said in an interview. "We're exploring all possibilities.
SPORTS
February 22, 1994 | By Timothy Dwyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As she approached a little knoll just before the midway section of the slalom course, Monique Pelletier knew she was in trouble. She was going too fast. She was right. When her skis hit the knoll, they got crossed up in the back and stuck together. The American dropped to the snow like a 50-pound bag of rock salt. Pelletier had been the 15th racer to start yesterday and had burned up the course at the top. A third of the way down the hill, she had recorded the third-fastest time of the morning and was on her way to a top-five finish in the women's combined, perhaps even a medal.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2009 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the steady flow of mostly positive economic news, topped off last week with the report that the nation had ended its longest slump in more than 60 years, it is hard to shed the worry that the recovery could stall before it did much good. The argument that the economic rebound is for real, that the tide has turned for more companies than not, was bolstered by an Inquirer analysis of third-quarter revenue changes at companies in the Philadelphia area. Revenue growth is crucial to replacing the 7.2 million U.S. jobs lost since December 2007.
LIVING
September 19, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
Karen Karuza considers her vintage Schwinn bicycle a prized possession, but not because it's a reliable means of transportation. "I keep it in the living room like a piece of sculpture," says Karuza, 49, a professor of fashion design at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. The blue bike fits in perfectly with the blond woods of the room's decor and the overall style of her Wyncote house, designed by modern architect Alan Berkowitz as his private residence. The 1955 dwelling, one of the stops on an Oct. 25 tour of eight modern homes in the Philadelphia area, is a prime example of midcentury modern style - now at the top of the architectural "in" list, and not just because of the popularity of AMC's critically acclaimed series Mad Men. Factor in nostalgia, the efficient floor plans emblematic of the period, and the currently sluggish real estate market, as well.
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