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Knots

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NEWS
September 12, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former rocker Michelle Phillips has California Dreamed her way onto the cast of the hottest soap at CBS. (Outside of the news division, that is.) Our Knots Landing spy reports that Phillips, the onetime Mamas and Papas star whose recent book on the '60s group has thrust her back into the national spotlight, will join the Knots intrigue for at least 10 episodes, beginning with the 17th segment. Phillips will pop up as the presumed-to-be-dead mother of young Paige Matheson, played by the impossibly leggy Nicollette Sheridan.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Jeff Davidson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When local fiber artist Ed Bing Lee makes his art, he likes it to be flexible - no getting bogged down by machinery, computer automation or bulky looms. For the 76-year-old Philadelphian, 10 fingers and a table do just fine. Lee's work is on display at the 33d annual Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show, which runs through Sunday. His intricate fiber creations are "definitely in the vein of one-of-a-kind, and that's what this show is all about," says show manager Nancy O'Meara.
NEWS
September 13, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The "Big J" is homeward bound. In the dawn's early light yesterday, the USS New Jersey inched out of its mothball berth between the aircraft carriers Ranger and Midway and was tethered by chains and braided steel cable to the seagoing tug Sea Victory for the long, slow trip to its birthplace in Philadelphia. With the 249-foot Sea Victory towing the New Jersey and two smaller tugs on its port and starboard sides, the 887-foot battleship glided out of Sinclair Inlet on the slack high tide at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and headed for Rich Passage before entering the shipping lanes of Puget Sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
  The 4700 Wissahickon Ave. complex, once the home of the old Atwater Kent Manufacturing Co., producer of radios, will attract bidders, not broadcasters, next week with sales at two of its tenants. One will even offer a smattering of vintage radio equipment. The first sale will begin at 11 a.m. Sunday at 4700's Suite 101, where Material Culture, the fledgling auction house specializing in ethnic objects from around the world, will offer more than 475 lots of early and contemporary art and antiques from developing nations.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
WHETHER IT'S WOOL or cashmere, a solid knit or patterned cloth, the scarf is one of winter's most stylish accessories. These Philadelphians were ready for the week's bitter cold, wrapping up in style with fancy French knots and utilitarian around-the-world whorls. Email: Bigrube@streetgazing.com On Twitter: @BigRubeHarley Blog: streetgazing.com
NEWS
July 6, 2015
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Agencies stymied The stalemate between the General Assembly and Gov. Wolf, if not resolved quickly, could have long-lasting effects on health and human-services providers who protect individuals throughout the commonwealth ("Wolf vetoes entire GOP budget," July 1). An extended budget impasse will reduce providers' ability to effectively make program and investment decisions. Providers may have insufficient cash to provide services, pay staff, and meet day-to-day expenses.
REAL_ESTATE
May 4, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A Shore homeowner wrote me several weeks ago about replacing an air-conditioning unit and expressed disappointment that I didn't show up to install a new unit guaranteed to last 100 years for free. Yet the problem of salty ocean air doing in air-conditioning units before their time is very real. In this space, I recommended research, including contacting contractors who work at the Shore and asking neighbors about their experiences. Hank Ohls e-mailed the day after that column appeared, offering advice.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The battleship New Jersey is slated to arrive this afternoon at the mouth of the Delaware Bay to begin the final 24-hour journey to its birthplace in Philadelphia. About 1,000 people have signed on for a sold-out special cruise aboard the Cape May-Lewes ferryboat Cape May to greet the warship this afternoon, and officials expect boaters and spectators to turn out along the river tomorrow for a Veterans Day salute to "The Big J. " The New Jersey, which had been in mothballs in Bremerton, Wash.
NEWS
June 16, 1986 | Inquirer photos by Tom Gralish
Drawing between 300 and 400 scouts from Connecticut to Virginia, the sixth annual Handicapped Camporee, sponsored by the Philadelphia Boy Scouts, was held over the weekend at the Philadelphia Navy Base. The scouts, both physically and mentally handicapped, participated in outdoor skills and games. They practiced first aid and tying knots, they went bowling and ate in the base mess hall, and they seemed to be having a fine time rollicking on the sun-drenched fields.
SPORTS
February 1, 1987 | By Al Morganti, Inquirer Staff Writer
The crew of Stars & Stripes probably couldn't have dreamed of a worse scenario in which to enter the first race of the America's Cup. A sky that had been clear and filled with a radiant sun nearly every day for about two months was suddenly mottled with a building cloud cover. And the Indian Ocean's surface had flattened from foamy blue-green swells into a mean-looking slate of gray. Worse than that, the cloud cover ensured that the bully sea breeze called the Fremantle Doctor would lay down in surrender.
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NEWS
July 6, 2015
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Agencies stymied The stalemate between the General Assembly and Gov. Wolf, if not resolved quickly, could have long-lasting effects on health and human-services providers who protect individuals throughout the commonwealth ("Wolf vetoes entire GOP budget," July 1). An extended budget impasse will reduce providers' ability to effectively make program and investment decisions. Providers may have insufficient cash to provide services, pay staff, and meet day-to-day expenses.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Somewhere in a remote part of Canada, antennae are likely picking up the signals of 100 shorebirds that just weeks ago were on the beaches of Delaware Bay, where they were caught with giant nets and fitted with tiny transmitters. The birds are robin-size creatures called red knots. After precipitous declines in their population on the bay - from about 100,000 birds in the 1990s to about 12,000 a few years ago - federal officials designated them as threatened in December. Researchers know that red knots have one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fates of a migratory shorebird, horseshoe crabs, and the state's oyster industry have converged at the center of a debate over how each should be accommodated where they come together every spring, in New Jersey tidal flats along the Delaware Bay. Wildlife advocates hope to restore the dwindling population of red knots, small birds that federal authorities listed as a threatened species about three months ago. The bird's round-trip migration of...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johnny's island wedding Johnny Depp 's fall from paradise - his ex-lover Vanessa Paradis , that is - was completed Sunday, when the 21 Jump Street heartthrob married Amber Heard , for the second time in a week. Depp, 51, who has two children with Paradis, wed 28-year-old Heard at an intimate do Tuesday at their Los Angeles home. Perhaps fearing that it wouldn't stick, he flew his bride and a gaggle of partiers to his 45-acre private Caribbean island of Little Hall's Pond Cay this weekend, where he had another wedding ceremony Sunday night.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending months of input and speculation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday added to its list of threatened species a small shorebird called the red knot, whose round-trip migration of nearly 20,000 miles includes stops on Delaware Bay every spring to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs. The bird's dramatic decline has been blamed by many on aggressive harvesting of the crabs, which are used as bait in other fisheries. However, the red knot is the first bird whose listing identifies climate change as a principal threat to its survival, said Dan Ashe, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Red Knot, a shorebird which has undergone a drastic decline in recent years, will be listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, according to the New Jersey Audubon. The action, which is expected to be announced next week, is a critical step toward the long-term protection and recovery of the species, said New Jersey Audubon, which has long addressed issues related to the Red Knot and other shorebirds. The listing would mean that the species meets the Endangered Species Act criteria of being likely to become in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIDDLE TWP., N.J. - In time for the spawning season of the horseshoe crab and the subsequent spring migration of shorebirds like the ruddy turnstone and the red knot, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has completed a $1.65 million restoration project along five Cape May County bay beaches. It is the first of 31 such "coastal resilience" projects focusing on rebuilding natural areas after Hurricane Sandy, according to Eric Schrading, a field supervisor for the service's New Jersey field office.
REAL_ESTATE
May 4, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A Shore homeowner wrote me several weeks ago about replacing an air-conditioning unit and expressed disappointment that I didn't show up to install a new unit guaranteed to last 100 years for free. Yet the problem of salty ocean air doing in air-conditioning units before their time is very real. In this space, I recommended research, including contacting contractors who work at the Shore and asking neighbors about their experiences. Hank Ohls e-mailed the day after that column appeared, offering advice.
SPORTS
April 28, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
THE FLYERS unearthed Kate Smith from the grave for another rendition of "God Bless America" last night, because, well, that is what they do when it is must-win. When the final horn sounded, practically blowing the roof off the Wells Fargo Center, the Flyers high-fived and retreated to their dressing room. Inside, Michael Jackson's "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" was blasting - the same postgame victory anthem that carried the Flyers within two wins of a Stanley Cup in 2010. The Rangers gave enough last night.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In 1973, when Bill Stauts first sought to serve on the Oaklyn Board of Education, 10 candidates competed for three open seats. "Those were the good old days," Stauts, 71, says of that era of civic engagement in the borough, where a single school serves about 400 students in prekindergarten through ninth grade. On Nov. 5, Stauts, a retired insurance broker, was elected to his 14th board term. His was one of only three names on the ballot, where five seats - two made vacant by recent resignations - were available.
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