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Koala

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NEWS
July 21, 1991 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospitable he was not, this less than ferocious 16-pound furball from Down Under who sat with his back to the lines of sweaty cherub faces that braved a wicked sun to see him. There he slouched on his oak perch, hidden by eucalyptus, his head nearly buried between his legs, oblivious to everything in his midsummer slumber under a Sanyo air conditioner. The multitudes outside the glass cage sweltered, and he, at 73 degrees, was cool. He's here, Kupala the koala. "When's he going to do something?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
He's a cute, 4-year-old picky eater who needs to be accompanied by an adult. Maybe that description does fit the freckle-faced kid who lives next door, but it also applies to the adorable koala debuting at the Philadelphia Zoo tomorrow. On loan from the San Diego Zoo for two months, Kupala the koala can be seen in the zoo's Discovery House tomorrow through Sept. 15. Tomorrow and Sunday, the first 5,000 children who visit Kupala will receive koala buttons. Youngsters might be surprised to learn that this furry, cuddly looking animal is not a bear.
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FIRST 'KOALA SPEED ZONE' TO BE ENFORCED IN AUSTRALIA Why did the koala cross the road? Probably because it was seeking a mate. Dangerous business in southeast Queensland, where about 350 koalas are struck by cars each mating season, prompting Australia's first speed limit to protect the national icon. Speed limits on some roads will be lowered from 50 m.p.h. to 37 m.p.h. between 7 p.m. and 5 a.m. to coincide with the koala's nocturnal mating habits. The limits will be in effect for the August-to-December breeding season, and may be extended to highways where speeds would be reduced from 62 m.p.h.
NEWS
November 23, 1996 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton explored nature in grand Australian fashion yesterday, snorkeling in the Great Barrier Reef, petting kangaroos and wallabees, and cuddling a baby koala bear named Chelsea. In steamy heat on the edge of the mountain-ringed Port Douglas Inlet, President Clinton took time out from appreciating nature to talk about it. He praised an international effort to prevent the destruction of the nearby Great Barrier Reef, a spectacular chain of coral so immense - 1,240 miles long - that it can be seen from outer space.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The U.S. Postal Service will help Australia celebrate its bicentennial, with a 22-cent commemorative featuring cartoon drawings of an American bald eagle and a koala. Australia is issuing a 37-cent stamp with similar drawings. First-day-of-issue ceremonies will be held in Washington and Sydney on Jan. 26, Australia Day, which commemorates the first European settlement in Australia in 1788. On the stamps, the eagle is dressed with a vest in stars and stripes, and the koala is wearing a vest of green and gold, Australia's official colors.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having the Italian ambassador from Washington trek to a Northeast Philadelphia manufacturing plant yesterday was a major clue that this was no ordinary groundbreaking. AgustaWestland Inc., one of the world's leading helicopter manufacturers, announced it was doubling the size of its factory here and adding 150 manufacturing jobs at a time when such jobs are disappearing in the United States. It is the second expansion in the last 18 months at Agusta Aerospace Corp., where helicopters shipped from Italy are assembled and customized.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the days when Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo and Donatello were artists and not Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, students would flock to a master's studio to help create paintings that entire nations could enjoy. Ten Upper Darby High School students and recent graduates are reenacting that artistic rite of passage, dipping brushes into burnt sienna and azure to create an endangered cultural species: public artwork. "I think this is awesome," said Lauren Klein, one of the artists who are painting murals on every hall wall in the school district's $1.9 million Kindergarten Center, set to open for the 1997-98 school year.
SPORTS
May 22, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Never underestimate the amount of conversation-producing tidbits that can be found in a baseball media guide. Can it really be the official residence of Phillies infielder Kevin Jordan is Birkdale, Queensland, Australia? "Yeah," he said, laughing. "More than any other place, I guess. " While playing winter ball in Australia after the 1992 season, Jordan met Nina Gorogo, who became his wife. Now, the pair spends a short amount of the offseason in Jordan's native San Francisco and spends the bulk in Australia.
NEWS
October 9, 2005 | By Janet Rupert FOR THE INQUIRER
My 50th birthday loomed, and I felt that the years were slipping away with too many dreams unfulfilled. I'd dreamed of visiting Australia since my teens; I decided to wait no longer. Shortly before my birthday, my husband and I took off on a 17-day tour down under. While I enjoyed the cities we visited, I fell in love with the outback and Kangaroo Island. KI, south of Adelaide, remains relatively undiscovered and undeveloped, with more koalas and kangaroos than people. It's definitely my kind of place.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 29, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Four times in the last week, friends sent cheeky e-mails alerting me to Mattel's new Journalist Barbie. Those who know me presumed I'd be horrified at the thought of Barbie as a professional role model for my 6-year-old daughter, Jane. Blame wanderlust or sexism, but Barbie can't keep a job. She's been an astronaut, aerobics instructor, rock star, nurse, and police officer. In the 1980s, "Day to Night CEO Barbie" took corporate America by storm. In 1992, a white Barbie ran for president; in 2004, a black one did. Barbie is both busty and ahead of her time.
NEWS
April 24, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The eggs are laid. The annual drama has begun. Across the country, from Karla Scanlon's first-grade Fishtown classroom to a watcher in Wichita, people are revving up their computers to learn what's next for two peregrine falcons nesting on a ledge of a Harrisburg office building. Will all five eggs hatch? Will the young survive? The answers will come via cameras perched nearby, feeding photos and video to the Internet. Focused so close you can see the birds breathing, the cameras provide an instant fix for wildlife voyeurs.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having the Italian ambassador from Washington trek to a Northeast Philadelphia manufacturing plant yesterday was a major clue that this was no ordinary groundbreaking. AgustaWestland Inc., one of the world's leading helicopter manufacturers, announced it was doubling the size of its factory here and adding 150 manufacturing jobs at a time when such jobs are disappearing in the United States. It is the second expansion in the last 18 months at Agusta Aerospace Corp., where helicopters shipped from Italy are assembled and customized.
NEWS
October 9, 2005 | By Janet Rupert FOR THE INQUIRER
My 50th birthday loomed, and I felt that the years were slipping away with too many dreams unfulfilled. I'd dreamed of visiting Australia since my teens; I decided to wait no longer. Shortly before my birthday, my husband and I took off on a 17-day tour down under. While I enjoyed the cities we visited, I fell in love with the outback and Kangaroo Island. KI, south of Adelaide, remains relatively undiscovered and undeveloped, with more koalas and kangaroos than people. It's definitely my kind of place.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2000 | By Katherine Ellison, FOR THE INQUIRER
Among its most charismatic recent recruits, the global "new economy" can claim platypuses, wombats, numbats and wallabies. All of these native Australian mammals, at risk because of steady habitat loss, are working assets of Earth Sanctuaries Ltd., which is taking a controversial new approach to environmental activism. On Monday, Earth Sanctuaries became a publicly traded company, with a listing on the Australian Stock Exchange and a market capitalization of $40.5 million (U.S.
SPORTS
May 22, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Never underestimate the amount of conversation-producing tidbits that can be found in a baseball media guide. Can it really be the official residence of Phillies infielder Kevin Jordan is Birkdale, Queensland, Australia? "Yeah," he said, laughing. "More than any other place, I guess. " While playing winter ball in Australia after the 1992 season, Jordan met Nina Gorogo, who became his wife. Now, the pair spends a short amount of the offseason in Jordan's native San Francisco and spends the bulk in Australia.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the days when Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo and Donatello were artists and not Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, students would flock to a master's studio to help create paintings that entire nations could enjoy. Ten Upper Darby High School students and recent graduates are reenacting that artistic rite of passage, dipping brushes into burnt sienna and azure to create an endangered cultural species: public artwork. "I think this is awesome," said Lauren Klein, one of the artists who are painting murals on every hall wall in the school district's $1.9 million Kindergarten Center, set to open for the 1997-98 school year.
NEWS
November 23, 1996 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton explored nature in grand Australian fashion yesterday, snorkeling in the Great Barrier Reef, petting kangaroos and wallabees, and cuddling a baby koala bear named Chelsea. In steamy heat on the edge of the mountain-ringed Port Douglas Inlet, President Clinton took time out from appreciating nature to talk about it. He praised an international effort to prevent the destruction of the nearby Great Barrier Reef, a spectacular chain of coral so immense - 1,240 miles long - that it can be seen from outer space.
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FIRST 'KOALA SPEED ZONE' TO BE ENFORCED IN AUSTRALIA Why did the koala cross the road? Probably because it was seeking a mate. Dangerous business in southeast Queensland, where about 350 koalas are struck by cars each mating season, prompting Australia's first speed limit to protect the national icon. Speed limits on some roads will be lowered from 50 m.p.h. to 37 m.p.h. between 7 p.m. and 5 a.m. to coincide with the koala's nocturnal mating habits. The limits will be in effect for the August-to-December breeding season, and may be extended to highways where speeds would be reduced from 62 m.p.h.
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