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NEWS
November 24, 2012
Bryce Bayer, 83, a retired Kodak scientist and the inventor of a widely used color filter array that bears his name, has died. Mr. Bayer, of Brunswick, Maine, died Nov. 13, a spokeswoman for Direct Cremation of Maine confirmed Friday. The cause of death wasn't released. His Bayer filter was patented in 1975 and is incorporated into nearly every digital camera and camera phone, Kodak said in a 2009 news release announcing Mr. Bayer's receipt that year of the Royal Photographic Society's Progress Award.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
The Eastman Kodak Co. recently signed a $5 million, long-term lease for 22,332 square feet at the Walnut Grove Corporate Center in Horsham. The company plans to use the space as a district sales office for its copier division. Kodak plans to move from its facility in Fort Washington to the new space, where it will be the lead tenant of the 84,000-square-foot flagship building. When completed, the Walnut Grove Corporate Center will have 270,000 square feet of office space in three buildings on 32 acres near Dresher and Witmer Roads.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
GOT A PILE of home movies sitting in a shoe box that you haven't combed through in years? Get motivated this week and the Philadelphia Film Archivists Collective could make your day - and your family into "stars" - at their Home Movie Day screening on Saturday. A spin-off of the Secret Cinema screening series, the Archivists Collective and Home Movie Day abide by the same "if it's not shot on film stock, it's $h*#" code of aesthetic purity. That's to say, they're not interested in showing anything you might have recorded in the home videotape era, which won consumers' hearts from the mid-1980s forward and pretty much destroyed the Kodak-dominated 8 mm and Super 8 mm film business.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
WASHINGTON - Deaths behind the wheel of an automobile fell last year to the lowest level since the Truman administration, but there was an increase in fatalities among bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcycle riders and big-rig truck drivers, according to federal figures released Monday. Overall, traffic deaths dropped to 32,367, almost 2 percent lower than the 2010 total, and a 26 percent decline since a peak in 2005. The downward national trend began before the recession took some drivers off the roads, and it accelerated last year.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Kent Hughes is director of the Program on America and the Global Economy at the Wilson Center in Washington ( www.wilsoncenter.org ) Can America make it without making it? The likely answer is no. The Philadelphia Fed's most recent Business Outlook Survey, announcing a precipitous drop in manufacturing and the attendant fall in the current employment index, highlights the weakened state of the industry and its crucial links to employment and economic growth. Similar reports from the New York Fed demonstrate that this is not simply a regional issue.
SPORTS
April 4, 2004 | By Mel Greenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The styles and stories of the teams in the NCAA Women's Final Four - who meet tonight at the sold-out New Orleans Arena - are as varied as the folks who can be found sampling Bourbon Street nightlife in the nearby French Quarter. Tennessee (30-3) will face Southeastern Conference rival Louisiana State University (27-7) in the first semifinal game at 7 before two-time defending NCAA champion Connecticut (29-4) meets Minnesota (25-8) about 9:30. Both games will be televised on ESPN.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Merion school board proposal to replace an aging photocopy machine - a purchase that raised the ire of some residents when a $100,000 price tag was mentioned - has been resolved by the board's decision to buy one for less than half that price. The board voted unanimously Monday to buy a new Kodak copier for $45,875. The copier now in use, also a Kodak, has a $10,000 trade-in value, reducing the cost to $35,875, John Schank, business manager, said. The total was a far cry from the $100,000 expenditure that some senior citizens had voiced concern about.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
You open the envelope and, instead of the prints or slides you expect, there's a note: "We appreciate your use of Kodak products and services and are anxious for all of your experiences with them to be rewarding. "While we wish it were otherwise, we must report that during the handling of your order the films were involved in an unusual laboratory experience. . . . " The letter, and similar letters from independent photo labs that have ruined your film, will go on to assure you that everybody is "sincerely concerned" and that in view of the circumstances (they have ruined your film, remember)
NEWS
August 1, 1992
Only a higher power saved us all from tragedy so profound the Republic itself was in danger. The higher power, of course, was Nike, the shoe company. The tragedy was the possibility we wouldn't see all our jolly band of American basketball jillionaires presented their medals after they finish whomping on a bunch of guys named Achmed or Horst. After all, it is difficult for those of us who can only dream of a clothes endorsement deal with, say, Marshall's or Syms, to imagine how it would curdle the soul of Michael Jordan or Charles Barkley to have to wear a Reebok jacket all the way through the entire national anthem.
NEWS
July 29, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It can get hard out there for a compliment guy. Especially when your cool campus phenomenon has morphed into a 12-city tour with a corporate sponsor, an entourage of two public-relations handlers, and a bossy videographer, hot weather, empty Rocky steps, and a park ranger who won't allow the little yellow Kodak "I was complimented today" stickers to be handed out at the Liberty Bell. But if anyone can keep looking on the bright side, it's these good-natured guys, shouting out compliments to passersby as they hang on to their goofy handwritten "Free Compliments (High Fives Welcome)"
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2012
WASHINGTON - Deaths behind the wheel of an automobile fell last year to the lowest level since the Truman administration, but there was an increase in fatalities among bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcycle riders and big-rig truck drivers, according to federal figures released Monday. Overall, traffic deaths dropped to 32,367, almost 2 percent lower than the 2010 total, and a 26 percent decline since a peak in 2005. The downward national trend began before the recession took some drivers off the roads, and it accelerated last year.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Bryce Bayer, 83, a retired Kodak scientist and the inventor of a widely used color filter array that bears his name, has died. Mr. Bayer, of Brunswick, Maine, died Nov. 13, a spokeswoman for Direct Cremation of Maine confirmed Friday. The cause of death wasn't released. His Bayer filter was patented in 1975 and is incorporated into nearly every digital camera and camera phone, Kodak said in a 2009 news release announcing Mr. Bayer's receipt that year of the Royal Photographic Society's Progress Award.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2012 | By Ryan Nakashima, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Each year at the Oscars ceremony, Hollywood says goodbye to stars and filmmakers who've died. This year, the award show will bid adieu to the Kodak Theatre. Just a decade ago, the glamorous 3,300-seat venue was touted as the Oscars' first permanent home, but the 131-year-old Eastman Kodak Co. has forfeited its sponsorship of the venue as it struggles with bankruptcy. The move symbolizes Kodak's fading star power in Hollywood. Although seven of the nine "Best Picture" nominees were shot on Kodak film, the industry's increasing use of digital editing and projection has ravaged the company's printing business.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2012 | Associated Press
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Picture it: Kodak is exiting the camera business. Eastman Kodak Co. said Thursday that it would stop making digital cameras, pocket video cameras, and digital picture frames in a move that marks the end of an era for the beleaguered 132-year-old company. Founded by George Eastman in 1880, Kodak was known all over the world for iconic cameras, such as the Brownie and the Instamatic. For the last few decades, however, the Rochester-based company has struggled.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012
"We enter 2012 stronger and more efficient after two years of simplifying and streamlining our company. " - Bank of America chief executive officer Brian T. Moynihan, on fourth-quarter results showing a $2 billion profit, despite tens of billions of dollars shed from its balance sheet and layoffs of nearly 7,000 employees. "Frankfurt is the most important financial center in Germany, and we have been looking for the past five years for the right opportunity. " - Dechert L.L.P.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
GOT A PILE of home movies sitting in a shoe box that you haven't combed through in years? Get motivated this week and the Philadelphia Film Archivists Collective could make your day - and your family into "stars" - at their Home Movie Day screening on Saturday. A spin-off of the Secret Cinema screening series, the Archivists Collective and Home Movie Day abide by the same "if it's not shot on film stock, it's $h*#" code of aesthetic purity. That's to say, they're not interested in showing anything you might have recorded in the home videotape era, which won consumers' hearts from the mid-1980s forward and pretty much destroyed the Kodak-dominated 8 mm and Super 8 mm film business.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Kent Hughes is director of the Program on America and the Global Economy at the Wilson Center in Washington ( www.wilsoncenter.org ) Can America make it without making it? The likely answer is no. The Philadelphia Fed's most recent Business Outlook Survey, announcing a precipitous drop in manufacturing and the attendant fall in the current employment index, highlights the weakened state of the industry and its crucial links to employment and economic growth. Similar reports from the New York Fed demonstrate that this is not simply a regional issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011
IT WOULD HAVE been very awkward if Sara Martin and Edward McNelis had broken up between submitting footage for Kevin Macdonald's documentary "Life in a Day" and its release today. Amid the other moments meant to capture the average person's life on July 24, 2010, is Martin and McNelis celebrating their first anniversary as a couple. McNelis, a Bensalem-native and Penn student, heard about Macdonald's project through ads on YouTube and Google. He hounded Martin to participate. Martin demurred at first.
NEWS
July 29, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It can get hard out there for a compliment guy. Especially when your cool campus phenomenon has morphed into a 12-city tour with a corporate sponsor, an entourage of two public-relations handlers, and a bossy videographer, hot weather, empty Rocky steps, and a park ranger who won't allow the little yellow Kodak "I was complimented today" stickers to be handed out at the Liberty Bell. But if anyone can keep looking on the bright side, it's these good-natured guys, shouting out compliments to passersby as they hang on to their goofy handwritten "Free Compliments (High Fives Welcome)"
BUSINESS
July 21, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Eastman Kodak Co. yesterday posted its third straight quarterly loss and said it would lay off up to 10,000 more people because its film business was declining much faster than the company had anticipated. The latest cuts will be in addition to the 15,000 positions it said it would eliminate in a 2004 announcement. After the job cuts and with additions from acquisitions, the company's workforce will be nearly 50,000. The layoffs come as the firm that turned picture-taking into a hobby for the masses navigates a tough transition from film to digital photography.
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