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Kohler

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NEWS
December 15, 2000 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
They've waved to each other, tossed a few words of greeting back and forth and they've smiled. It's all done discreetly and out of the public view. Mayor Street, the former activist and now master of the insider political game, and Lt. Mary Kohler, a determined city paramedic suffering from hepatitis C and fighting for her union cause. They are on opposite sides of a contentious legal battle over an arbitration award that set out a two-year contract for 2,400 city firefighters.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Years of medical training did not prepare F. Peter Kohler for his moonlighting job - helping people with visas and reparation checks and organizing sightseeing tours. Since 1987, Kohler has been the German consul for Philadelphia, an honorary diplomat. "In medicine you deal with people when they are at their most vulnerable time," said Kohler, a Bryn Mawr resident who for many years has been a urologist at Lankenau Hospital. "Patients rely on you for truth, competency and ability.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Some averted their eyes from her makeshift bed and her weary form. Others, too busy toting glasses of white zinfandel or noshing on diced cheese and hors d'oeuvres, didn't notice her at all. But Mary Kohler was very much there, last night, in the hallway at City Hall, just feet from the mayor's annual holiday staff party, a lush spread of cakes, fruit, and countless gourmet platters. City bigs walked past her makeshift air mattress bed without acknowledging her. But that didn't bother Kohler, who grows weaker in body but stronger in resolve every day. Yesterday marked day 14 for Kohler, who has gained national attention for camping outside Street's office to demand better health benefits and coverage for firefighters stricken with hepatitis C. "It doesn't bother me at all," said Kohler, resting her head against a wall, as music keyed up and glasses clinked a room away.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | By Chuck Newman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Stay in the present" is this year's philosophy of the soccer team, the slogan displayed prominently on a sign posted in the locker room. No one involved has to be reminded about living up to the past at Lower Merion High. An area power back as far as anyone can remember, a district power almost annually and a state contender for the last eight years, the school keeps producing top talent. Over the last four years, the Aces have had four scholastic all-Americans: Lou Spivak, who went on to a strong program at Textile; Chris Schreiner, who went to Mercer County (N.J.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lower Merion has one of the richest soccer traditions in all of District 1. The school has more than 650 varsity wins since play began in 1924. The Aces have won a state title and been a runner-up two other times. Lower Merion also has captured 27 league titles. And in the last six years alone, Lower Merion has produced six high school all-Americans. But, according to current Lower Merion coach Bob Davidson, one player stands above them all. And on Thursday, Will Kohler showed again why he's the best, scoring 2 goals, including the game-winner, to lead the Aces past Radnor, 4-3, in a very big Central League contest.
NEWS
December 8, 2000
As people in 12-step programs will tell you, Denial is not a river in Egypt. Denial is what makes a bad problem even worse. Denial is also the city's M.O. in dealing with hepatitis C among the 150 or so firefighters who have contracted it. The city routinely denies all worker's comp claims filed by firefighters with hep C. They continue to deny that it's a work-related problem, because if they did, it would cost millions. Lt. Mary Kohler is not the first person that has shown us the ravages of firefighters infected with hepatitis C. What Kohler, a paramedic, has done is put a human face on the city's denial of the problem.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A paramedic who has become something of a symbol of the city's hepatitisC-stricken firefighters began a one-woman protest yesterday that continued early this morning outside Mayor Street's office. Lt. Mary Kohler, 37, wants to meet with the mayor and persuade him to implement the firefighters' contract awarded last month by arbitrators. But Street has declined to meet with Kohler. He passed her in the second-story hallway of City Hall twice yesterday without acknowledging her. "I'm not going to negotiate contracts with each one of 24,000 [city]
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY ROBERT STRAUSS, For the Daily News
STONE HARBOR and Avalon tend to be the most tradition-bound places at the South Jersey Shore, even more than Cape May, with its Victorian claptrap. A change in a menu item from one season to the next can cause an uproar around here. And when an Italian restaurant closes, for instance, another must take its place (as has happened over the years at a space at 98th Street and 3rd Avenue in Stone Harbor). Even the lifeguards return to the same stand year after year. So it is difficult to uncover real quirks for the cognoscenti.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 44-year-old Upper Darby man was sentenced to six to 15 years in state prison yesterday after pleading guilty to having sex with a then-14-year-old boy from Chester County he met on the Internet. Joseph A. Kohler pleaded guilty to involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, a felony that carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, moments before jury selection was set to begin in his trial. Attorneys on both sides declined to comment after the hearing. The victim, whose name is being withheld by The Inquirer, left the courtroom in tears.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
As Mayor Street hobnobbed at a New York City political gathering this weekend, hepatitis C-stricken paramedic Lt. Mary Kohler continued her vigil outside his City Hall office. Kohler said she continues to lose weight. She battles fever off and on. But she said she isn't budging until the mayor agrees to stop blocking an arbitrator's extension of benefits to stricken firefighters and medics like her, or at least talks to her. "I'm hanging in there," Kohler told Barbara Hogan, a Northeast Philadelphian who came bearing a supply of Nutrigrain cereal bars and offering Kohler a sympathetic hug. "People like you have been great, coming in and showing support.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY ROBERT STRAUSS, For the Daily News
STONE HARBOR and Avalon tend to be the most tradition-bound places at the South Jersey Shore, even more than Cape May, with its Victorian claptrap. A change in a menu item from one season to the next can cause an uproar around here. And when an Italian restaurant closes, for instance, another must take its place (as has happened over the years at a space at 98th Street and 3rd Avenue in Stone Harbor). Even the lifeguards return to the same stand year after year. So it is difficult to uncover real quirks for the cognoscenti.
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ellen Lucile Kohler, 91, a key University of Pennsylvania archaeologist who excavated the site in central Turkey where artifacts of Alexander the Great and King Midas were found, died Monday at Bryn Mawr Terrace. She was a longtime resident of University City. The Gordion archaeological project, which began in 1950, was one of Penn's most famous excavations, said Gareth Darbyshire of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. "Her death is the end of an era," he said.
LIVING
September 5, 2008 | By Elaine Markoutsas FOR THE INQUIRER
Settle in and have your achy muscles caressed. Breathe fragrant aromas of eucalyptus, lavender, sandalwood or grapefruit. Listen to Bach, Beethoven or cool jazz, and melt away stress in a steam shower. You know you want to pamper yourself, and now there's no need to travel to an exotic location. You can create a luxe bath/personal spa right at home. Just as thread counts determine a bed sheet's degree of luxury, the number of jets and nozzles have become the deciding factors in upgrading shower and tub features.
NEWS
May 30, 2008 | By Mary Beth Breckenridge, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
There are loos. And then there are lulus. The humble toilet isn't necessarily a plain-Jane - or should we say plain-John? - fixture anymore. It's gone upscale, fashioned in stainless steel, clad in leather, and pimped out with heated seats, water-jet cleansing systems, and all manner of gadgetry designed to make your stay more satisfying. It's all in keeping with the increasing emphasis placed on kitchens and bathrooms, says Lenora Campos, public relations manager for the U.S. arm of high-tech Japanese toilet-maker Toto.
SPORTS
January 17, 2002 | By Josh Egerman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Kim Kohler had already recommitted herself to her sport once. Doing it a second time forced her to do it a third. Coming off an admittedly poor summer of training and competition, Kohler, a Cherokee junior, took stock of her swimming career and decided to pour herself back into it. Then, in September, an allergy to chlorine caused multiple sties around her eyes that needed to be surgically removed. She was out of the water for three weeks. "I was real motivated," said Kohler, one of the region's top freestylers.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five months ago, Mary Kohler - the voice and spirit of Philadelphia firefighters stricken with hepatitis C - could finally see the future. And it was fine. "My husband and I were planning on going on a cruise, when the treatment was over, for our fifth wedding anniversary," she said. "We were thinking of renewing our vows. We were starting life over. " But then her latest blood test - a second one that she hoped would show that a powerful new drug had felled the disease - came back in mid-October.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | By Kay Raftery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Raymond D. Kohler, 76, of North Coventry, a retired traffic manager and a former township supervisor, died of heart failure Tuesday at his home. Mr. Kohler was a supervisor from 1955 to 1976, when he retired as the chairman of the board. His son David R. Kohler said Mr. Kohler was in charge of evacuation and rescue operations in the township after Hurricane Agnes in June 1972. The South Pottstown area of the township was heavily damaged in the storm, David Kohler said.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYOR STREET spent last year laying plans for some very big challenges - improving city schools, rescuing the Philadelphia Gas Works, reviving crumbling neighborhoods and building new sports stadiums. He worked hard to make deals - often behind closed doors. He spent big, burning a hole in the $295 million budget surplus Ed Rendell left behind. But unlike last year's budget, which he inherited from Rendell, Street will be working without a net when he explains today in his annual budget address how we will pay for his ambitious plans.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A judge is poised to rule today on a disputed labor contract for city firefighters, one day after ailing paramedic Mary Kohler ended her strength-sapping 14-day protest outside Mayor Street's office. Kohler, weakened by two weeks spent sleeping on the City Hall floor, and firefighter Norm Stabinski left the hallway at noon yesterday as more than 300 firefighters cheered. The colleagues, both fighting hepatitis C, have become the symbols of their union's struggle to secure sick-time reimbursement for firefighters with the ailment.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Some averted their eyes from her makeshift bed and her weary form. Others, too busy toting glasses of white zinfandel or noshing on diced cheese and hors d'oeuvres, didn't notice her at all. But Mary Kohler was very much there, last night, in the hallway at City Hall, just feet from the mayor's annual holiday staff party, a lush spread of cakes, fruit, and countless gourmet platters. City bigs walked past her makeshift air mattress bed without acknowledging her. But that didn't bother Kohler, who grows weaker in body but stronger in resolve every day. Yesterday marked day 14 for Kohler, who has gained national attention for camping outside Street's office to demand better health benefits and coverage for firefighters stricken with hepatitis C. "It doesn't bother me at all," said Kohler, resting her head against a wall, as music keyed up and glasses clinked a room away.
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