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FOOD
August 18, 1993 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Kool-Aid Pink Swimmingo Soft Drink Mix. Sugar-sweetened, unsweetened and sugar-free. 79 cents per half-ounce package of sugar-sweetened yielding 2 quarts. Also available in .16-ounce packet of unsweetened, 19-ounce canister of sugar-sweetened and 1.1-ounce 4-packet box of sugar-free. Bonnie: The package of Kool-Aid's new unsweetened Pink Swimmingo states "25 percent less sugar than Coke or Pepsi. " That's like saying cotton candy has less sugar than taffy! Both statements are true, but misleading when all these products are primarily just sugar and, in the case of Kool-Aid, Coke and Pepsi, artificial colors and flavors.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1993 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why does Kool Aid need to come in bottles that are then cocooned in plastic? Why do cookies need to be individually packaged? Environmentalists yesterday raised those questions in handing out junk- packaging awards to nine household products they deemed to be packaged in ways that harm the environment. Kraft's Kool Aid Bursts and General Mills' Dunkaroos individually wrapped cookies were among the products singled out by Clean Water Action and Public Interest Research Group for their award.
NEWS
October 1, 2010
The city has recently been engaged in a National Conversation on Race, otherwise known as "Who's black enough?" It's not easy: Black is not a color. It's a state of mind. That's why Tom Jones is blacker than Clarence Thomas. It's why Mario Von Peebles is just as black as Jesse Jackson. It's why we hailed Bill Clinton as the first black president, and laughed those corny parts right off Vanilla Ice's head. Blackness is not in the way you walk, either. You can stroll like Rollo from "Sanford and Son" and still not be black enough.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Champion breakfast Former Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway's 1993 Wheaties box - one of his five appearances for the cereal - has been chosen by more than 200,000 voters as one of the Top 10 all-time favorites. The others included Michael Jordan, Babe Ruth and Tiger Woods. Elway's box will be reissued this year in honor of the flakes' 75th anniversary. Hello, Sotto Billed as "the first seafood restaurant on the Avenue of the Arts," Sotto, at 231 S. Broad St. (beneath Upstares at Varalli)
FOOD
July 19, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
While America marks the 20th anniversary of man's landing on the moon, the folks at General Foods are quietly celebrating another extraordinary technological achievement of the 20th century. It was in 1957 that General Foods scientists gave the world and outer space their first official powdered breakfast drink - Tang. Face facts, America. One of the most enduring benefits to come from outer space since the Russians sent up a satellite named Sputnik was Tang. For many years, it was the breakfast drink of the astronauts.
FOOD
May 9, 1990 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
QUAKER OAT BRAN CEREAL. Regular, apple and spice, and raisin and cinnamon. $2.59 per 9.84- to 10- ounce box of eight packets. BONNIE: Quaker, the company most people think of when they think of oatmeal, has just introduced a hot oat bran cereal. Oat bran is the nutrient- rich part of oats that's been associated with a reduction in blood cholesterol; this new cereal is mainly oat bran. Each variety of Quaker Oat Bran is moderate in sodium (about 220 milligrams), low in fat (2 grams)
NEWS
November 7, 1988
THE GOOD LIFE IS AN OPEN PAGE There is no shortage of good days. It is good lives that are hard to come by. A life of good days lived in the sense is not enough. The life of sensation is the life of greed; it requires more and more. The life of the spirit requires less and less . . . . Who would call a day spent reading a good day? But a life spending reading - that is a good life. - Annie Dillard, Tikkun, November issue WHERE IT'S TOUGH TO BE A GOOD SCOUT Communism doesn't really starve or execute that many people.
NEWS
January 20, 2009
THANK YOU, Stu Bykofsky, for your column on the Mummers and B Love Strutters. My husband is a longtime Murray Comic and my sons are B Love Strutters and none are racists. I appreciate you defending the tradition. Pam Hershman, West Chester Stu, you're dead right regarding the editorial on the "racist" Mummers. Do you need to be a knucklehead to qualify for the board? This is one of the reasons I stopped reading the DN years ago. Bill Yurkow, Philadelphia Stu: What a surprise - the self-loathing idiots who preach tolerance are the most narrow-minded intolerant Kool-Aid drinkers, always playing the victim.
SPORTS
August 11, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Greg Murphy, charged with repairing baseball's tattered image as the game's new marketing czar, acknowledges that declines in attendance, TV ratings and overall revenue are symptomatic of a problem. "We're out of balance," he said. "If we were marketing our stars and our heroes, Albert Belle would not be vilified and crucified the way he has been. " Murphy, hired two months ago, says he is astounded that the most popular and recognizable baseball name in a recent survey was Mickey Mantle, which speaks to another problem: "Lack of heroes.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Cherry Hill man accused of beating his 5-year-old nephew to death because the boy took sweets from a kitchen cabinet without asking was found guilty yesterday by a Camden County jury. The child, Donte Johnson, died on March 10, 1989, of head and abdominal injuries, according to an autopsy report. Wallace Ingalls, his legal guardian, told police that he hit the boy, but denied that the blows could have led to the boy's death. Defense attorney James Klein said the jury apparently believed that Ingalls intended to hurt, but not kill, Donte.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2016 | .By Hillary Rea, For The Inquirer
Justin Bieber does not smile. During the Purpose World Tour on Saturday night at the Wells Fargo Center, the 22-year-old Canadian pop star wavered between a hardened stare and a blank expression as he bounced, flipped, and falsetto-ed his way through a two-hour spectacle. It was difficult to determine whether the constant shrill screams of the mostly female crowd were in support of this newfound stoicism or a cry to let loose and take his shirt off. Either way, Bieber commanded their attention and delivered a set that both baffled and entertained.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
EVERYBODY LOVES the food-trend story about the Next Big Thing. We love those list-y, breathlessly cheerful pronouncements of what's "best of" the city, of what the cool kids are eating and drinking, of what is - as they say - "hot. " And yet . . . how do I put this? Food trend stories about the Next Big Thing almost always suck. Maybe I'm just self-reflecting. Writers absolutely hate doing this sort of piece. If I list 10 trends, I'll be lucky if you agree with, like, two of them.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
A 29-YEAR-OLD semipublic nuisance, Aaron Proctor would rather be right than popular. Far right. The tall, goateed bald blogger - part gadfly, part H.L. Mencken, part Howard Stern - has been in more hot water than a tea bag, but he won't shut up. Under a thin shell of exhibitionism, the self-described "right-wing basket case" deeply cares about Philly and wants to reverse what he calls the Philly Decline, which is also the biting name...
NEWS
October 1, 2010
The city has recently been engaged in a National Conversation on Race, otherwise known as "Who's black enough?" It's not easy: Black is not a color. It's a state of mind. That's why Tom Jones is blacker than Clarence Thomas. It's why Mario Von Peebles is just as black as Jesse Jackson. It's why we hailed Bill Clinton as the first black president, and laughed those corny parts right off Vanilla Ice's head. Blackness is not in the way you walk, either. You can stroll like Rollo from "Sanford and Son" and still not be black enough.
SPORTS
May 11, 2010
The Eagles are holding a Media Chalk Talk on Tuesday night down at the NovaCare Complex. In a shocking development, and despite my uninterrupted criticism of the organization, I've been added to the guest list. What sort of information do you think will be gleaned from the evening (complete with Howie Roseman, hors d'oeuvres, and an open bar)? And, my invitation was almost certainly a clerical error, right? I'm writing this from a doctor's office as I await a CAT scan. Want to trade?
NEWS
January 20, 2009
THANK YOU, Stu Bykofsky, for your column on the Mummers and B Love Strutters. My husband is a longtime Murray Comic and my sons are B Love Strutters and none are racists. I appreciate you defending the tradition. Pam Hershman, West Chester Stu, you're dead right regarding the editorial on the "racist" Mummers. Do you need to be a knucklehead to qualify for the board? This is one of the reasons I stopped reading the DN years ago. Bill Yurkow, Philadelphia Stu: What a surprise - the self-loathing idiots who preach tolerance are the most narrow-minded intolerant Kool-Aid drinkers, always playing the victim.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Pete Kennedy FOR THE INQUIRER
The aftermath of a roadside explosion in Iraq can be horrific; the need to move fast to save those trapped in blown-up vehicles is imperative. In October 2006, Sgt. First Class Nelson Long, who had gone to Iraq as part of a Spring City National Guard unit, never hesitated when he heard an explosion in the convoy behind him. He got on the radio in his armored security vehicle and called in help, then rushed to the burning vehicle to join in...
SPORTS
April 19, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher was fined $100,000 by the NFL for wearing a cap during Super Bowl media day that promoted a sponsor not authorized by the league. NFL rules prohibit gear that advertises any product but a designated sponsor, league spokesman Brian McCarthy said yesterday. Urlacher was fined for drinking vitaminwater and wearing a vitaminwater hat during the media session in Miami leading to the title game. Gatorade is the NFL's official drink. McCarthy said this is the first time such a fine has been levied.
NEWS
April 11, 2006 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though he couldn't pass up the fried plantains, Tour? never drank the mojito. Too predictable. So, in typically unpredictable fashion, the award-winning journalist and pundit forgoes the mojito in favor of the less pedestrian caipirinha, a Brazilian libation concocted of cacha?a (sugar cane rum), lime juice and sugar. It's a drink with integrity that packs a heckuva kick. Much like the man who ordered it. Tour?, 35, for more than 10 years a contributing editor at Rolling Stone, now host, writer and producer at BET News, has made a steady, if meandering, rise through the ranks of hip-hop journalism, emerging as a celebrity himself.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | By Rachel Simon
A few summers ago, I was hired to teach gifted teenagers in a weeklong writing program. This was before American killing fields had sprawled onto school blacktops. That sweltering July - the first time I'd taught younger than undergraduate age - I drove to the Pennsylvania college that housed the program, envisioning students much like I'd been in school. Yes, I thought upon entering the classroom, that's who they were. Whether from metropolitan centers or one-dog towns, wearing backward baseball caps or Kool-Aid green hair, they were conscientious, independent thinkers.
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