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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Cross La Femme Nikita with a John Woo Hong Kong actioner, set it against a backdrop of military tension between split nations locked in a dangerous cold war, add a quirky metaphor about kissing fish, and you have the compelling, kinetic, fast and furious South Korean film Shiri. A huge hit in its homeland, director Kang Je-Gyu's bloody and brutal thriller is set, after a dateline-hopping montage-y prologue, mostly in Seoul. There two intelligence agents (Han Suk-Kyu and Song Kang-Ho)
NEWS
July 2, 2000
The picture of Marines landing from a helicopter on a ridge in Korea in September 1951 brought back memories (Inquirer, June 25). I was in Korea at that time, and the most amazing sight that I remember about helicopters was from a hill our company had just attacked and occupied. We had numerous casualties. I looked across the valley at another hill and saw a helicopter land on it. I questioned our company commander about it, and he informed me that it was evacuating casualties.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Close your eyes and project yourself into a land of eternal spring, where the air is perfumed with peach blossoms and a balladeer croons of the forbidden love between the governor's son and the courtesan's daughter. You can feel the atmosphere charged with spiritual and erotic energy. The setting is 18th-century Korea and the story is Chunhyang, a feverishly passionate movie from veteran filmmaker Kwon Taek Im that might be described as Robin Hood with raging hormones. To tell this traditional story, Im employs a traditional storyteller, a pansori player, a singer whose one-man chorus provides a running commentary upon the narrative.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirteen women, all from either Korea or Thailand, were arraigned yesterday on prostitution charges stemming from police raids this week on four 24-hour massage parlors in downtown Atlantic City. Police sources said some of the women were believed to have been brought over from Asia and forced to work as prostitutes in parlors allegedly run by Asian organized crime. The women typically work six months in a city before being moved to another location, police said, and operate under an "indentured servant" status, to pay off the expense of bringing them to the United States.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | ANDREA MIHALIK / DAILY NEWS
Korean business-man Young Nam Yoo (second from right) explains his products to other executives at a meeting yesterday at the St. Regis Hotel. A delegation of leaders from Inchon, Korea, are visiting Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | GEORGE MILLER/ DAILY NEWS
Robert Hauswald, 3, of Gilbertsville, waves his flag after becoming a U.S. citizen at special naturalization ceremony for adopted children yesterday at the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Center City. Robert was born in Korea.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | For The Inquirer / NANCY WEGARD
Saluting a fallen comrade, Ed Batten of Maple Shade visits the Beverly National Cemetery in Beverly, N.J. Batten, a 20-year Marine who fought in World War II and Korea, walked though most of a parade yesterday, then caught a ride on a firetruck to the cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The event of the year for the Irish film industry is undoubtedly Neil Jordan's epic biography Michael Collins, which opens in two weeks. New Irish Film: A Mirror to Irish Culture, a selection of features and shorts celebrating the health and diversity of the nation's cinema, offers both a contrast and a fine way to prepare for Jordan's picture. The mini-festival of Irish films at International House opens Wednesday with Korea and continues through next Sunday. Korea, the directing debut of vibrantly talented filmmaker Cathal Black, sets the high standard for the series.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
All the guys who hung out at 10th and Lowell in Whitman Park had nicknames. There were Moose, Winky, Dickie Doo - and a wiry fellow they called Muscles. "That's because I didn't have any," explains Stan Bednarczyk, who's written and published My Wagging Tail , a detailed, deeply felt memoir about a Camden corner boy, the neighborhood he loved, and the man he became. The author, now 81, grew up the youngest of five children of an immigrant Polish couple who spoke little English.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The manager of the West Philadelphia store apparently got tired of the panhandler bothering customers. So Deng Chung, 32, asked a clerk to help him lure Deon Brown, 26, inside, and the two beat and terrorized him around midnight July 10, 1992. Brown suffered bone fractures and multiple bruises, and later required surgery, said Assistant District Attorney Tracey Rible. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen sentenced the clerk, Sung Mimpark, 28, to four to eight months in prison, under the work-release program, plus one-year probation.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 2016
The U.N. Security Council on Wednesday unanimously approved the toughest sanctions on North Korea in two decades, reflecting growing anger at Pyongyang's latest nuclear test and rocket launch in defiance of a ban on all nuclear-related activity. The United States and China, North Korea's traditional ally, spent seven weeks negotiating the new sanctions, which include mandatory inspections of cargo leaving and entering North Korea by land, sea or air; a ban on all sales or transfers of small arms and light weapons to Pyongyang; and expulsion of diplomats from the North who engage in "illicit activities.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Many GOP presidential candidates, including Gov. Christie, were quick to lash out Wednesday at President Obama and Democrat Hillary Clinton in response to North Korea's declaring that it had detonated a hydrogen bomb. Some Republican and Democratic candidates advocated for added pressure on China in response to the claim, which had not been verified by U.S. officials. A White House spokesman said Wednesday that initial monitoring data were "not consistent with North Korean claims of a successful hydrogen bomb test.
SPORTS
July 14, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANCASTER - The week at Lancaster Country Club was all new for In Gee Chun. She never had played in the U.S. Women's Open. Her history of tournament play in the United States amounted to a few LPGA events earlier this year on the West Coast. She employed a caddie she hadn't used before in competition. For the 20-year-old South Korean, however, she acted as if she had been playing in U.S. majors for years. Her game and her nerves were rock-solid in the final round Sunday as the entire field chased Amy Yang, who had led for much of the weekend and appeared as if she couldn't be caught.
SPORTS
June 1, 2015 | By Jonathan Tannenwald, For The Inquirer
HARRISON, N.J. - As the national anthem concluded before the U.S. women's soccer team kicked off against South Korea, the American Outlaws fan club raised a giant banner in front of the stands at its end of the field. It depicted the Women's World Cup trophy along with a simple message: "BRING IT HOME. " But Saturday's scoreless draw at a sold-out Red Bull Arena showed that there is still work to be done if the Americans are to accomplish that mission. In part because stars Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe were out injured, the attack lacked fluidity.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
DOES THE COMCAST repair guy even have a three-hour service-call window for Pyongyang? Somebody - maybe the United States government, but no one's talking - launched a big hack attack on North Korea yesterday, taking down all Internet service in the rogue dictatorship believed behind the cyber-warfare that caused Sony Pictures to cancel its satirical movie "The Interview. " Of course, knocking out the World Wide Web for 9 1/2 hours in Kim Jong Un's primitive totalitarian state is akin to forcing the 76ers to forfeit all of their 2014-15 victories.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
All the guys who hung out at 10th and Lowell in Whitman Park had nicknames. There were Moose, Winky, Dickie Doo - and a wiry fellow they called Muscles. "That's because I didn't have any," explains Stan Bednarczyk, who's written and published My Wagging Tail , a detailed, deeply felt memoir about a Camden corner boy, the neighborhood he loved, and the man he became. The author, now 81, grew up the youngest of five children of an immigrant Polish couple who spoke little English.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROBERT BERGHAIER probably could have been a writer or an artist. He didn't take up either trade, but his son, Robert, said his father, a veteran of two wars, had a discerning eye. "He was very observant," his son said. "He had a very good eye and a gift for being very descriptive. He could process information and tell you exactly what happened. " What happened to Robert Berghaier might have made a good book. He and his son would sit around the kitchen table and the elder Berghaier would regale his son with stories of his adventures, down to the smallest detail.
SPORTS
October 22, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE FLYERS had Kate Smith, the Royals have SungWoo Lee. Lee doesn't sing, but he's every bit a good-luck charm as Kate was. Lee, a self-professed Royals "Super Fan," is jetting from South Korea to Kansas City to attend Game 1 of tonight's World Series opener pitting the Royals against the Giants. He's said he likes to root for the underdog and has been a Royals fan for some 20 years. When he visited KC in August, he was invited to throw out the first pitch at a game. During his stay, the team went 9-1, including a three-game sweep of the Giants.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Artillery shells rained down on them during the daylight hours, and human waves of Chinese soldiers battered their lines at night. But Army Cpl. Emerito Bermudez and others in the 65th Infantry Regiment - the "Borinqueneers" from Puerto Rico - stood their ground during the Korean War, garnering a reputation as fierce fighters. "I remember the surprise attacks, shelling, and winters with lots of snow and temperatures at 10 below zero," said Bermudez, 83, of Vineland, whose comments in Spanish were interpreted by his son Orlando.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Patrick, who grew up in West Chester, had been living and teaching English in Korea for just two months when he posted his profile on a website for English speakers. That's where he met Erica. She grew up in Busan, Korea, studied hospitality at the University of Delaware, and interned and worked at hotels in South Carolina for two years before moving to Seoul, where she worked as a project manager for Rosetta Stone. They were amazed that Erica, now 29, was at Delaware when Patrick lived less than an hour away in West Chester, and that she was in South Carolina when he was studying history at the University of South Carolina.
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