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Korean War

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NEWS
June 23, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
Fifty years after North Korean troops stormed across the 38th Parallel into South Korea, the Korean War may finally be ending. It all depends on the real intentions of the world's most peculiar leader, North Korea's Kim Jong Il, who last week hosted the first-ever summit between the leaders of North and South Korea. But things are looking unexpectedly promising. True, it's hard to penetrate the thinking of a man who maintains the last diehard communist state. North Korea has been kept sealed off from the rest of the world, its failed economy unreformed and kept afloat by military sales and international aid. The population starves while the numbers under arms, and the share of the budget that pays for those arms, outstrip any other country.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Nelson Schwartz, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The design for a $6 million memorial to the Korean War - "a dreamlike" collection of 38 stone soldiers marching into battle - was unveiled yesterday at a White House ceremony that also honored four Penn State architects who designed it. The winning design was one of 543 submissions received by the Korean War Veterans Memorial Design Jury and will be located on the south side of the Reflecting Pool, across from the Vietnam War Memorial, on the...
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A struggle for control of the memory of the Korean War has embroiled a retired four-star Army general, the producer of a six-hour television show on the war and the series' chief historian. The retired general, Richard G. Stilwell, who was the CIA's ranking officer in the Far East during the Korean War, sought and won a dozen "important changes" in the series, its executive producer said. The producer, Austin Hoyt of WGBH-TV, a Public Broadcasting System station in Boston, said he made the changes solely for accuracy and clarity.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Skeletal remains that were believed to be those of Army Cpl. Arthur Leo Seaton of Chester, who disappeared nearly 40 years ago in the Korean War, belong to another man, a family member said yesterday. "We were hoping it was him," said James L. Seaton, 34, the missing man's nephew, who knows his uncle only by reputation. "Now there's nothing we can do about it. " The North Koreans turned over five bodies of U.S. servicemen on May 28. Based on a dog-tag identification, one of the bodies was believed to have been Seaton's.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph F. Spross, 83, a lifelong Fishtown resident who fought in the Korean War, died Friday, June 14, at his home. Mr. Spross, known to many in his neighborhood for the care he took in cleaning and maintaining the 300 block of East Thompson Street, where he lived, died of a heart attack as he was organizing trash bins for pickup that day. "Everybody in the neighborhood will miss him," said son Chris. Mr. Spross served in the Army during the Korean War, then returned to Fishtown and went to work on the bottling line for the Gruber's soda company in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
Nearly 50 years after the onset of the Korean war, allegations have surfaced that U.S. soldiers massacred hundreds of South Korean refugees from one village who were hiding under a railroad bridge at the start of the fighting. Survivors had tried to bring their story to the attention of U.S. authorities since 1994, with no success until reporters recently found a dozen former G.I.s who backed up parts of the account. It is already being compared to My Lai, the infamous episode in 1968 where U.S. troops killed hundreds in a Vietnamese village.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The architects who designed a new Korean War veterans memorial say that federal bureaucrats "brutally changed" their design and intend to build a "radically different" memorial that "glorifies war. " The fight over the design of the memorial, which is to be built on Washington's mall directly across the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, is becoming a battle over the way in which the Korean War will be remembered. The architects' design won a national competition when a 10-member jury of Korean War veterans selected the work over that of 540 competitors last year.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering a series of setbacks in the early days of the Korean War, U.S. officials were anxious for a victory. They got it on July 21, 1950, when the Buffalo Soldiers of the Army's 24th Infantry Regiment, which had just arrived in Korea, retook Yechon in a counterattack. Though the victory was short-lived, U.S. Rep. Thomas Lane of Massachusetts stood before the House and praised the black troops "who believed not only in the United States as it is, but in the nation that it will become when intolerance is also defeated.
NEWS
September 17, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most of the mourners never knew Cpl. Edwin C. Steigerwalt, whose funeral in Allentown yesterday came 55 years after his death in the Korean War. But like veteran Peter Chacho, they shed tears for the 22-year-old farmhand from Lehighton whose identity took a team of experts 12 years to discover. "He was a brother," said Chacho, 71, of Whitehall, who fought in Korea two years after Steigerwalt went missing in 1950. "I came out of respect for the man. " About 100 veterans of various wars gathered under a warm sun at Cedar Hill Memorial Park, joining Steigerwalt's three sisters, nieces and nephews for a 25-minute service with full military honors.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Chico Harlan, Washington Post
SEOUL, South Korea - In a stage-managed display of military might, tanks, missiles, and blocks of goose-stepping soldiers rolled through the wide streets of Pyongyang on Saturday, marking the 60th anniversary of what North Korea calls its "victory" in a war that ended in a draw. The massive military parade, North Korea's first in more than a year, was designed both as a showcase for its 30-year-old leader's strength and as a warning to the foreign neighbors Pyongyang often threatens.
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NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first time a former prisoner of war had delivered the Memorial Day keynote address at the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans monument. But Ralph W. Galati did not want it to be about himself. "It's a lot different for me, sitting in a cell, than these guys fighting in combat," he said, gesturing to the 646 names inscribed on the granite walls behind him at Penn's Landing. "The least I can do is represent Vietnam veterans, and especially the guys that never got the welcome home that I did. " Galati was referring both to those who gave their lives and those who came home to deep, sometimes violent antiwar sentiment.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Clarence Warren, 90, of Haverford, a surgeon who practiced urology at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 40 years ending in 1995, died Wednesday, April 22, of respiratory failure at Broomall Presbyterian Village. During his long career on the Main Line, Dr. Warren cared for thousands of patients with warmth and kindness, his family said. "He tried for perfection in everything he did, the surgery, and had a warm bedside manner with patients," said son Scott. Born and reared in Trenton, Dr. Warren was recruited to Tulane University, where he starred in basketball and baseball.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 86-year-old Korean War veteran and his 55-year-old wife told police they were kidnapped Thursday morning by three women who forced them to open a bank account and rent two cars for them. Shaken and unharmed but indignant, the couple on Saturday recounted the bizarre tale of their six-hour abduction ordeal. Police said five people, including one of the alleged kidnappers, have been arrested. George Saunders and his wife, Priscilla Jones, of Southwest Philadelphia, said they were walking - with the aid of canes - to a convenience store for groceries about 11 a.m. Thursday on the 3000 block of Pennsgrove Street in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just days before the battle at Hoengsong, South Korea, Army Cpl. Robert Higgins wrote a few words to his mother, Edith, in Philadelphia. He was hoping for more news from home. "When I get mail, I only get one letter that is from you," he wrote in his last letter, on Feb. 9, 1951. "I would like to have someone else write me, too. "It's like you said a long time ago, when all others stop writing, you will still write," he wrote. "Thanks for everything. Bob. " A few days later, Chinese forces overwhelmed his unit and others, killing hundreds and taking more than 100 prisoners in what became known as the Hoengsong massacre.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOB HIGGINS is coming home. After 63 years, the remains of the young Fishtown soldier, who was captured in a bloody battle at the height of the Korean War in 1951, will be returned here for proper ceremony and burial. His remains will arrive at Philadelphia International Airport from Hawaii on Thursday. A military escort will accompany the coffin to St. Ephrem Catholic Church in Bensalem for the funeral on Saturday. The escort will then accompany the coffin to Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Bucks County, for burial with full military honors.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William R. Johnson, 86, of Drexel Hill, a retired manager for Radio Corp. of America in Camden, died Friday, Jan. 23, of pneumonia at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. For 35 years, Mr. Johnson worked in the broadcast systems division at RCA as a manufacturing administrator. "He was an accountant. He took care of their budget; he watched their money. He was the only non-engineer in the department. He really, really liked it," said daughter Susanne Davis. When General Electric bought RCA, he left that position but continued working part-time at St. Francis Country House in Darby Borough and Acro Display in the Hunting Park section of Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LEROY MALACHI Sr. didn't hesitate to grab a broom or a snow shovel and go out on his block on 61st Street near Race in West Philadelphia, to put his muscle into improving his neighborhood. And Leroy had muscle to spare. In his youth, he won bodybuilding contests and titles like Mr. Pennsylvania, Mr. Maryland and Mr. New Jersey, his family said. In the AAU Senior Nationals weightlifting event held in Philadelphia in 1956, he came in fifth in the heavyweight class with a combined lift of 865 pounds - press, 300, snatch, 250, clean and jerk, 315. Leroy Malachi Sr., a 37-year machinist for the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, an Army veteran of the Korean War, and loving father, grandfather and great-grandfather, died Nov. 10. He was 84. Leroy was a popular figure in his West Philadelphia neighborhood where he was an officer of the block committee and helped arrange events, especially those for the children.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
While honoring members of the armed services with special ceremonies on Veterans Day, the nation should also take time to reflect on its decision more than 40 years ago to field an all-volunteer military. It certainly made sense at the time for war-weary Americans trying to quit the Vietnam conflict. And there's no appetite to revive the draft now, after more than a dozen years of fighting in Afghanistan and with more military "advisers" returning to Iraq. This country has used conscription since its birth, when it was employed on a limited basis to fill militia ranks during the Revolutionary War. The first national drafts occurred during the Civil War, but only about 2 percent of Union troops were draftees, and some prospective conscripts paid others to take their place.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROBERT BERGHAIER probably could have been a writer or an artist. He didn't take up either trade, but his son, Robert, said his father, a veteran of two wars, had a discerning eye. "He was very observant," his son said. "He had a very good eye and a gift for being very descriptive. He could process information and tell you exactly what happened. " What happened to Robert Berghaier might have made a good book. He and his son would sit around the kitchen table and the elder Berghaier would regale his son with stories of his adventures, down to the smallest detail.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The gently rolling land at Brig. Gen. William C. Doyle Veterans Memorial Cemetery is usually a quiet, contemplative place. Flags flap in the breeze, visitors kneel at graves with flowers, and a line of cars heads to graveside services. But these days, the peace and serenity of the state-operated Burlington County cemetery is often broken by the sounds of heavy construction - part of a federally funded $18 million, three-year-long improvement project making way for more burials.
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