CollectionsKorean War
IN THE NEWS

Korean War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
Fifty years after North Korean troops stormed across the 38th Parallel into South Korea, the Korean War may finally be ending. It all depends on the real intentions of the world's most peculiar leader, North Korea's Kim Jong Il, who last week hosted the first-ever summit between the leaders of North and South Korea. But things are looking unexpectedly promising. True, it's hard to penetrate the thinking of a man who maintains the last diehard communist state. North Korea has been kept sealed off from the rest of the world, its failed economy unreformed and kept afloat by military sales and international aid. The population starves while the numbers under arms, and the share of the budget that pays for those arms, outstrip any other country.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Nelson Schwartz, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The design for a $6 million memorial to the Korean War - "a dreamlike" collection of 38 stone soldiers marching into battle - was unveiled yesterday at a White House ceremony that also honored four Penn State architects who designed it. The winning design was one of 543 submissions received by the Korean War Veterans Memorial Design Jury and will be located on the south side of the Reflecting Pool, across from the Vietnam War Memorial, on the...
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A struggle for control of the memory of the Korean War has embroiled a retired four-star Army general, the producer of a six-hour television show on the war and the series' chief historian. The retired general, Richard G. Stilwell, who was the CIA's ranking officer in the Far East during the Korean War, sought and won a dozen "important changes" in the series, its executive producer said. The producer, Austin Hoyt of WGBH-TV, a Public Broadcasting System station in Boston, said he made the changes solely for accuracy and clarity.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Skeletal remains that were believed to be those of Army Cpl. Arthur Leo Seaton of Chester, who disappeared nearly 40 years ago in the Korean War, belong to another man, a family member said yesterday. "We were hoping it was him," said James L. Seaton, 34, the missing man's nephew, who knows his uncle only by reputation. "Now there's nothing we can do about it. " The North Koreans turned over five bodies of U.S. servicemen on May 28. Based on a dog-tag identification, one of the bodies was believed to have been Seaton's.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph F. Spross, 83, a lifelong Fishtown resident who fought in the Korean War, died Friday, June 14, at his home. Mr. Spross, known to many in his neighborhood for the care he took in cleaning and maintaining the 300 block of East Thompson Street, where he lived, died of a heart attack as he was organizing trash bins for pickup that day. "Everybody in the neighborhood will miss him," said son Chris. Mr. Spross served in the Army during the Korean War, then returned to Fishtown and went to work on the bottling line for the Gruber's soda company in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
Nearly 50 years after the onset of the Korean war, allegations have surfaced that U.S. soldiers massacred hundreds of South Korean refugees from one village who were hiding under a railroad bridge at the start of the fighting. Survivors had tried to bring their story to the attention of U.S. authorities since 1994, with no success until reporters recently found a dozen former G.I.s who backed up parts of the account. It is already being compared to My Lai, the infamous episode in 1968 where U.S. troops killed hundreds in a Vietnamese village.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The architects who designed a new Korean War veterans memorial say that federal bureaucrats "brutally changed" their design and intend to build a "radically different" memorial that "glorifies war. " The fight over the design of the memorial, which is to be built on Washington's mall directly across the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, is becoming a battle over the way in which the Korean War will be remembered. The architects' design won a national competition when a 10-member jury of Korean War veterans selected the work over that of 540 competitors last year.
NEWS
December 23, 2015
"The greatest rescue operation by a single ship in the history of mankind. "   - U.S. Maritime Administration   By Chris Gibbons On Dec. 22, 1950, Capt. Leonard LaRue, of Philadelphia, peered through his binoculars from the deck of his merchant cargo vessel, SS Meredith Victory, as it approached the besieged North Korean port of Hungnam. LaRue could see thousands of shivering refugees lining the harbor in a desperate attempt to escape the marauding Communist Chinese and North Korean soldiers who surrounded, and were quickly closing in on, the city.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering a series of setbacks in the early days of the Korean War, U.S. officials were anxious for a victory. They got it on July 21, 1950, when the Buffalo Soldiers of the Army's 24th Infantry Regiment, which had just arrived in Korea, retook Yechon in a counterattack. Though the victory was short-lived, U.S. Rep. Thomas Lane of Massachusetts stood before the House and praised the black troops "who believed not only in the United States as it is, but in the nation that it will become when intolerance is also defeated.
NEWS
September 17, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most of the mourners never knew Cpl. Edwin C. Steigerwalt, whose funeral in Allentown yesterday came 55 years after his death in the Korean War. But like veteran Peter Chacho, they shed tears for the 22-year-old farmhand from Lehighton whose identity took a team of experts 12 years to discover. "He was a brother," said Chacho, 71, of Whitehall, who fought in Korea two years after Steigerwalt went missing in 1950. "I came out of respect for the man. " About 100 veterans of various wars gathered under a warm sun at Cedar Hill Memorial Park, joining Steigerwalt's three sisters, nieces and nephews for a 25-minute service with full military honors.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
It's not often that The Tonight Show becomes the showcase for college fund-raising. But Upper Darby native Tina Fey changed that Wednesday night when she said on the show that she and her brother, Peter, had created a Temple University scholarship fund in memory of their father, Donald, a Temple alumnus, who died in October. The show briefly ran the scholarship fund link - Giving.Temple.edu/FeyMemorial - on the screen as Fey talked. The fund had already collected some gifts, including a donation from Tonight host Jimmy Fallon, said David Boardman, dean of Temple's School of Media and Communication.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John J. Sweeney, 85, of Wynnewood, a retired rear admiral in the U.S. Navy and later an insurance company executive, died Monday, Jan. 4, of prostate cancer at Lankenau Hospital. In a career that combined military service with business, Adm. Sweeney made a point of serving as an advocate for young people. Born in Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, he moved to Philadelphia with his family at age 10. He graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1948 and from St. Joseph's College in 1952 with a bachelor's degree in economics.
NEWS
December 23, 2015
"The greatest rescue operation by a single ship in the history of mankind. "   - U.S. Maritime Administration   By Chris Gibbons On Dec. 22, 1950, Capt. Leonard LaRue, of Philadelphia, peered through his binoculars from the deck of his merchant cargo vessel, SS Meredith Victory, as it approached the besieged North Korean port of Hungnam. LaRue could see thousands of shivering refugees lining the harbor in a desperate attempt to escape the marauding Communist Chinese and North Korean soldiers who surrounded, and were quickly closing in on, the city.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald H. Fey, 82, a Korean War veteran, former Philadelphia firefighter, and retired fund-raising writer, died Sunday, Oct. 18, of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Fey, of Drexel Hill, whose daughter is award-winning writer and actress Tina Fey, was a professional writer for more than 30 years, primarily in fund-raising and development. He helped raise more than $500 million for schools, hospitals, and public-service agencies. In 1992, he retired from Thomas Jefferson University, where he was director of development communications.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. O'Connor Jr., 82, a veteran of the wars in Korea and Vietnam, died Sunday, Oct. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital. No cause of death has been established, said his daughter Karol Mooney. Mooney said her father, who served 21 years in the military and was a letter carrier for 25 years, never wanted to be rich and was content with his life. She called him "a great dad and a wonderful Pop-Pop. " Open and friendly, he was one to give solid, reliable advice, she said. "He prided himself as the one that you can always count on, no matter what you needed.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Shockley, 84, of Springfield, Delaware County, a former car-dealership owner, died Tuesday, Sept. 22, of Parkinson's disease at his home. The son of Raymond Purnell Shockley Sr. and Helen Davis Shockley, he was born and reared in Darby. He lived in Springfield before moving to Newtown Square last year. As a teenager, he broke many pitching records while playing baseball for Darby High School and was especially proud of his no-hitters. He was elected senior class president and voted best dancer and "Mr. All-Around Personality.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas J. Myer Jr., 92, of Chestnut Hill, a retired stockbroker and veteran of World War II and the Korean War, died Wednesday, Sept. 9, of cancer at Keystone House in Wyndmoor. After graduating from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1942, Mr. Myer joined the Marine Corps and was sent to the Pacific Theater. He was among the first wave of Marines to reach the shore of Okinawa during the fierce fighting with the Japanese that began in April 1945. After the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and then Nagasaki in August 1945, Mr. Myer and his unit were sent to patrol the ruined city of Nagasaki.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first time a former prisoner of war had delivered the Memorial Day keynote address at the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans monument. But Ralph W. Galati did not want it to be about himself. "It's a lot different for me, sitting in a cell, than these guys fighting in combat," he said, gesturing to the 646 names inscribed on the granite walls behind him at Penn's Landing. "The least I can do is represent Vietnam veterans, and especially the guys that never got the welcome home that I did. " Galati was referring both to those who gave their lives and those who came home to deep, sometimes violent antiwar sentiment.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Clarence Warren, 90, of Haverford, a surgeon who practiced urology at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 40 years ending in 1995, died Wednesday, April 22, of respiratory failure at Broomall Presbyterian Village. During his long career on the Main Line, Dr. Warren cared for thousands of patients with warmth and kindness, his family said. "He tried for perfection in everything he did, the surgery, and had a warm bedside manner with patients," said son Scott. Born and reared in Trenton, Dr. Warren was recruited to Tulane University, where he starred in basketball and baseball.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 86-year-old Korean War veteran and his 55-year-old wife told police they were kidnapped Thursday morning by three women who forced them to open a bank account and rent two cars for them. Shaken and unharmed but indignant, the couple on Saturday recounted the bizarre tale of their six-hour abduction ordeal. Police said five people, including one of the alleged kidnappers, have been arrested. George Saunders and his wife, Priscilla Jones, of Southwest Philadelphia, said they were walking - with the aid of canes - to a convenience store for groceries about 11 a.m. Thursday on the 3000 block of Pennsgrove Street in West Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|